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Military

Chapter 1.....INTRODUCTION


Section I. Organizations
Section II. Missions, Capabilities, and Limitations
Section III. Responsibilities

Introduction

The role of the cavalry troop in Army operations remains unchanged from the traditional role of cavalry throughout the history of warfare. The troop is organized, equipped, and trained to protect and preserve the fighting ability of other combined arms forces. While its primary missions are reconnaissance and security, the cavalry troop may be called upon to execute attack, defend, and delay missions as part of squadron and regimental missions. The troop accomplishes its missions by communicating, moving, and shooting in that order.

The purpose of this chapter is--

  • To depict organizations of the cavalry troop in--

Heavy Troop:

  • The Armored Cavalry Regiment (ACR) (M1 and M3 equipped).
  • The Heavy Division Cavalry Squadron (M1 and M3 equipped).

Light Troop:

  • The Light Armored Cavalry Regiment (LACR) (HMMWV equipped).

  • To outline missions each troop performs and to highlight each troop's capabilities and limitations.
  • To establish responsibilities of key personnel in combat.

Section I. Organizations

The HEAVY Cavalry Troop

The heavy cavalry troop consists of 6 officers and 126 enlisted soldiers. The troop is organized into a headquarters section, two scout platoons, two tank platoons, a mortar section, and a maintenance section (see Figure 1-1).

Figure 1-1. Heavy cavalry troop organization.

The Heavy Troop Scout Platoon

The scout platoon is organized and equipped to conduct reconnaissance and screening in support of its parent troop. However, when the parent unit is performing missions within an economy-of-force role, the scout platoon may conduct offensive, defensive, and retrograde operations in support of the troop mission. The platoon consists of 1 officer and 29 enlisted soldiers, and is equipped with six M3 cavalry fighting vehicles (CFV) organized into three scout sections (see Figure 1-2).

Figure 1-2. Scout platoon organization.

The Heavy Troop Tank Platoon

The tank platoon is organized and equipped to perform its three primary missions--attack, defend, and move. The platoon consists of 1 officer and 15 enlisted soldiers manning four M1A1 Abrams main battle tanks organized into two sections (see Figure 1-3).

Figure 1-3. Tank platoon organization.

The Heavy Troop Mortar Section

The mortar section is organized and equipped to provide immediate indirect fires in support of troop operations. Such supporting fires are usually suppression, screening, obscuration, or illumination. The section consists of nine enlisted soldiers. It is equipped with two 107-mm mortars mounted in two self-propelled mortar carriers (see Figure 1-4).

Figure 1-4. Mortar section organization.

The Heavy Troop Maintenance Section


This section is organized and equipped to diagnose and repair most equipment faults at troop level. It has the capability to recover all troop vehicles and to maintain the troop's equipment records. The section consists of 18 enlisted soldiers equipped with one armored personnel carrier (APC), one heavy recovery vehicle, one utility truck with cargo trailer, and two cargo trucks with cargo trailers (see Figure 1-5).

Figure 1-5. Maintenance section organization.

The Heavy Troop Headquarters Section

The troop headquarters section is organized and equipped to perform command and control and logistical support functions for the troop. The section consists of 2 officers and 11 enlisted soldiers. It is equipped with one main battle tank, one command post (CP) carrier, one APC, one M3 CFV, one cargo truck with a 400-gallon water trailer, and two utility trucks with one cargo trailer (see Figure 1-6).

Figure 1-6. Headquarters section organization.

The Fire Support Team (FIST)

The FIST comes from the squadron howitzer battery in the heavy cavalry regiment and the division artillery in the division cavalry squadron. The FIST consists of one fire support officer (FSO), one NCO (team chief), one enlisted fire support specialist, and one enlisted radio operator. The FIST is responsible for coordinating indirect fires for the troop. In the heavy troop the team is mounted on an M981 FIST vehicle (see Figure 1-7).

Figure 1-7. FIST organization.

The Light Cavalry Troop

The light cavalry troop consists of 6 officers and 107 enlisted soldiers. The troop is organized into a headquarters section, two scout platoons, two antitank (AT) platoons, a mortar section, and a maintenance section (see Figure 1-8).

Figure 1-8. Light cavalry troop organization.

The Light Troop Scout Platoon

The scout platoon is organized and equipped to conduct reconnaissance and screening in support of its parent troop. However, when the parent unit is performing missions within an economy-of-force role, the scout platoon may conduct offensive, defensive, and retrograde operations in support of the troop mission. The platoon consists of 1 officer and 29 enlisted soldiers. It is equipped with ten M1025/M1026 HMMWVs (five MK-19 equipped and five cal .50 equipped). The platoon can organize into various configurations, usually from two to five sections, depending on factors of METT-T (see Figure 1-9). FM 17-98 details the tactics, techniques, and procedures for employing the HMMWV scout platoon.

Figure 1-9. Light troop scout platoon organization.

The Light Troop Antitank Platoon

The AT platoon is organized and equipped to perform its three primary missions--attack, defend, and move. The platoon consists of 1 officer and 11 enlisted soldiers manning four M996 HMMWVs (TOW carriers) organized into two sections (see Figure 1-10).

Figure 1-10. Light troop AT platoon organization.

The Light Troop Mortar Section

The mortar section is organized and equipped to provide immediate indirect fires to support troop operations. Such supporting fires are usually suppression, screening, obscuration, or illumination. The section consists of nine enlisted soldiers. It is equipped with two 120-mm mortars trailered by three M1025/M1026 HMMWVs (see Figure 1-11).

Figure 1-11. Light troop mortar section organization.

The Light Troop Maintenance Section

This section is organized and equipped to diagnose and repair most equipment faults at troop level. It has the capability to recover all troop vehicles and to maintain the troop's equipment records. The section consists of eight enlisted soldiers equipped with one M998 cargo/troop carrier HMMWV, one cargo truck with cargo trailer, and one 5-ton wrecker (see Figure 1-12).

Figure 1-12. Light troop maintenance section organization.

The Light Troop Headquarters Section

The troop headquarters section is organized and equipped to perform command and control and logistical support functions for the troop. The section consists of two officers and ten enlisted soldiers. It is equipped with one M1025 HMMWV, one M1037 HMMWV shelter carrier with S250 shelter, one M998 HMMWV with cargo trailer, and one 2 1/2-ton cargo truck with 400-gallon water trailer (see Figure 1-13).

Figure 1-13. Light troop headquarters section organization.

The Fire Support Team (FIST)

The FIST comes from the squadron howitzer battery in the light cavalry regiment. The FIST consists of one officer (FSO), one NCO (team chief), one enlisted fire support specialist, and one enlisted radio operator. The FIST is responsible for coordinating indirect fires for the troop. In the light troop the team is mounted on a HMMWV (see Figure 1-14).

Figure 1-14. Light troop FIST organization.

Section II. Missions, Capabilities, and Limitations

Missions

Heavy and light cavalry troops perform reconnaissance and security missions to protect and preserve the fighting ability of the units to which they are assigned or attached. Both troops also conduct offensive, defensive, and retrograde operations in an economy-of-force role. Cavalry troops in general have limitations and capabilities associated with their TOEs and METT-T that must be considered when employing them in a specific mission role (see Figure 1-15).

Figure 1-15. Cavalry troop mission profiles.

Capabilities

The heavy cavalry troop is a unit that can be deployed by rail, sea, or both into a theater of operations. It can perform its missions under all visibility conditions and in any terrain that supports heavy armor movement. The integrated thermal sights on the M1A1 tank and M3 CFV along with ancillary passive night sights and night vision devices authorized to the troop provide an outstanding nighttime/reduced visibility acquisition and fighting capability. Additionally, the firepower and survivability organic to the heavy cavalry troop allow it to execute missions aggressively across the spectrum of warfare.

The light cavalry troop is a unit that can be rapidly deployed by air, rail, or sea into a theater of operations. It can perform its missions under all visibility conditions and in any terrain that supports wheeled vehicle movement. The ancillary thermal and night vision devices authorized to the troop provide an excellent reduced visibility acquisition capability. However, the light cavalry troop's ability to fight under reduced visibility conditions is limited because of its lack of integrated passive and thermal sights on stabilized weapons platforms.

Limitations

Given suitable terrain conditions, the ability of heavy and light cavalry troops to accomplish their assigned missions is mainly limited by the size and strength of threat forces encountered. Both troops are limited in close terrain, especially urban environments, due to their limited number of dismounted scouts. Also, the troops are dependent on their parent squadrons and regiments for additional combat support (CS) and combat service support (CSS) assets.

Section III. Responsibilities

The Troop Commander

The troop commander is responsible to the squadron commander (SCO) for the discipline, combat readiness, and training of the troop, and for the maintenance of its equipment. He must be proficient in the tactical employment of the troop and its assigned and attached CS elements. He must also know the capabilities and limitations of the troop's personnel and equipment as well as those of CS elements attached to him.

The troop commander's responsibility in combat is twofold. He will-

  • Accomplish all missions assigned to the troop in accordance with the SCO's intent.
  • Preserve the fighting capability of the troop.

The Executive Officer

In combat, the troop executive officer (XO) is second in command. He supervises the troop tactical operations center (TOC), where he stays abreast of the tactical situation in the troop's area of operations (AO). He manages the flow of combat information between the troop and the squadron from the troop TOC. With the assistance of the troop first sergeant (1SG), he plans and coordinates CSS for the troop.

The First Sergeant

The primary responsibility of the troop 1SG is sustaining the troop's ability to fight. He supervises the procurement and distribution of fuel, ammunition, food, water, clothing, equipment, replacements, and repair parts. He receives incoming personnel and assigns them to subordinate elements as needed. He is responsible for the medical evacuation of sick, injured, and wounded soldiers to the supporting medical treatment facility. He is also responsible for the evacuation of soldiers killed in action to the supporting graves registration collection point. He is also responsible for the recovery and evacuation of damaged combat equipment.

The Troop Fire Support Officer

The troop FSO is responsible for the planning and coordination of the troop fire support plan. He relays troop requests for indirect fire and advises the commander on the employment of indirect-fire weapons in support of the troop's maneuver. The troop FSO may control and position the mortars during combat operations.

The Platoon Leader

The platoon leader is responsible to the troop commander for the discipline, combat readiness, and training of the platoon, and for the maintenance of its equipment. He must be proficient in the tactical employment of the platoon and know the capabilities and limitations of the platoon's personnel and equipment.

The platoon leader's responsibility in combat is twofold. He must--

  • Accomplish all missions assigned to the platoon in accordance with the troop commander's intent.
  • Preserve the fighting capability of the platoon.

The Platoon Sergeant

The platoon sergeant (PSG) leads elements of the platoon as directed by the platoon leader, and assumes command of the platoon in his absence. The PSG assists the platoon leader in maintaining discipline, conducting training, and exercising control. He supervises platoon CSS, which includes supply and equipment maintenance.

The Mortar Section Sergeant

The mortar section sergeant is responsible for providing responsive indirect fires to support the troop commander's concept of the operation.

The Supply Sergeant

The supply sergeant picks up, transports, and issues supplies and equipment to the troop. He works closely with the 1SG to accomplish these tasks. He also evacuates enemy prisoners of war and assists in the evacuation of soldiers who are killed in action to the graves registration collection point.

The Maintenance Sergeant

The maintenance sergeant is responsible for the prompt battlefield repair or recovery of damaged or inoperable equipment. He works closely with the 1SG to accomplish these tasks.

The Communications Sergeant

The communications sergeant ensures the troop TOC and its crew are prepared for combat operations, and assists the XO in the TOC during combat operations. Within his capability, he repairs the communications equipment of subordinate elements.

The Nuclear, Biological, Chemical (NBC) NCO

The troop NBC NCO is responsible for troop NBC defense activities. He supervises radiological monitoring, chemical detection, and decontamination operations. He assists in maintaining NBC equipment and training NBC equipment operators and decontamination teams.

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