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LESSON 5 AIR DEFENSE COMMAND AND CONTROL AND RADAR WARNING SYSTEMS

TASK

This lesson does not specifically relate to any enlisted or officer task but provides general information on air defense command and radar warning systems.

CONDITIONS

Use only the lesson material to complete the examination.

STANDARDS

You must attain a grade of 70 percent on the examination to receive credit for this subcourse.

REFERENCES

Lesson material.

Learning Event 1:THE MISSILE MINDER AN/TSQ-73

MISSILE MINDER AN/TSQ-73

The Missile Minder AN/TSQ-73 (Figure 67) is a command and control system that performs fire direction functions for Hawk and Patriot units. The AN/TSQ-73 also has two data link capabilities: ATDL-1 to link with fire units and TADIL-B to link with Air Force control and reporting center (CRC) or other higher sources.

System Description

The Missile Minder employs advanced electronic technology. It is self-contained, fully automated, and easily transported. The system is available in two configurations: the brigade-level system, normally assigned to a brigade having HIMAD battalions; and the battalion-level system assigned to Patriot, Hawk, and Hercules battalions. At battalion level the actual direction of the air defense battle occurs. These functions include real-time functions of target detection, target tracking, and command and control of firing batteries for engagement.

The Missile Minder system consists of the following major subsystems:

o Radar interface equipment.

o Automatic data processing equipment.

o Communications equipment.

o Display equipment.

o Power equipment.

The subsystems are enclosed in one air portable shelter (Figure 68). Within the shelter are maintenance and repair facilities and equipment to include a workbench, storage for reference material and spare parts, and tools and test equipment for user maintenance.

System Operation

The Missile Minder performs the functions of target track correlation, IFF display, threat evaluation, weapon assignment, data exchange with other systems, and target simulation for training. There is also a status board which displays real-time fire unit status.

The display consoles provide the primary interface between the operator and the AN/TSQ-73 system. Two station display consoles, with both planned position indicators (PPI) and auxiliary read-out (ARO) displayed on a single cathode ray tube (CRT), provide the operator with the essential data to make fast, accurate decisions based on "real-time" display information.

The display consoles provide the following display data (Figure 69):

o Track positions.

o Weapon positions.

o Maps.

o Jam strobes.

o Velocity vectors.

o Safe corridors.

o Pairing lines.

o Defended areas and points.

Learning Event 2: ELECTRONIC SEARCH CENTRAL AN/GSS-1

ELECTRONIC SEARCH CENTRAL AN/GSS-1

The electronic search central AN/GSS-1 (Figure 70) is a medium-range, transportable radar set designed for use as a search radar. The AN/GSS-1 was first fielded in the mid-50s and there are no firm plans for modifying or replacing this system at the present time.

System Description

The electronic search central consists of a radar set AN/TPS-1G, IFF equipment, and a manual plotting board. All this equipment is contained in a truck-mounted metal shelter. The system is connected by electrical cables to the Missile Minder AN/TSQ-73. The AN/GSS-1 is operated by a four-man crew. The radar system provides the real-time azimuth and range position data of aerial targets to the AN/TSQ-73, which relays these data over radio communications links to Hawk fire units.

System Operation

As a search radar in an early warning net, the AN/GSS-1 will search in an assigned area and report information to an evaluation center. The radar will detect targets and provide target position data to a fire distribution system or an Army air defense command post. The AN/GSS-1 provides target identification when in autonomous operation or when directed by higher headquarters. This set may also be employed in an emergency as an alternate Army air defense command post when collocated with either a manual or automatic fire distribution capability.

Learning Event 3: FORWARD AREA ALERTING RADAR (FAAR) AN/MPQ-49

FAAR

The FAAR system provides organic early warning sensors to divisional and nondivisional SHORAD units and to separate brigade and armored cavalry regiment SHORAD units when augmented.

System Description

The FAAR system (Figure 71) is a complete, self-contained alerting radar system. It is lightweight, mobile, and capable of being deployed under the same climatic and terrain conditions as the Chaparral, Vulcan, and Redeye/Stinger systems with which it operates. The system is airportable by cargo aircraft and can be sling-lifted by helicopter. The system is equipped for on-vehicle intercommunications between crew members and tactical voice radio communications.

The prime mover is an M561 Gamma Goat which tows the trailer-mounted, 5-kilowatt generator for radar power.

System Operation

The FAAR system aids in denying enemy aircraft undetected access to forward combat areas. Relative positions, in terms of distance and azimuths and tentative identification in terms of friend or unknown, are obtained from each target. The FAAR consists of the following major components:

o Radar set AN/TPQ-32.

o Interrogator set AN/TPX-50 (IFF).

o Radio set AN/VRC-46 (track: 1 voice, 1 data).

o Truck M561.

o Generator set, 5-kilowatt.

o Trailer M101A2.

System Characteristics

The FAAR is manned by a three-man section consisting of a section chief, senior FAAR operator, and FAAR operator. FAAR system characteristics are shown in Figure 72.

Learning Event 4: TARGET ALERT DATA DISPLAY SET (TADDS)

TAADS

The primary mode of operation for the TADDS is to receive early warning information from adjacent FAARs and to relay this information by voice to each supported Chaparral, Vulcan, and Redeye/Stinger fire unit.

System Description

The battery-operated TADDS (Figure 73) is a lightweight receiver used by weapon crews to receive target alert information transmitted from a FAAR. The TADDS consists of the following major components:

o FM receiver frequency select function used to punch in or select frequency of the day.

o Data processor and display group 7 by 7 grid matrix with orange and green disks identifying friend from unknown.

o Battery set 6-volt, nickel cadmium battery; four hours of operation per charge.

System Operation

In addition to providing alert warning information to Chaparral and Vulcan squads, and to Stinger/Redeye teams, FAAR/TAADS provide low-altitude air defense weapons with tentative identification and approximate range and azimuth of approaching aircraft. The TADDS receives, and displays on a matrix, the location and tentative identification of aerial targets detected by its assigned FAAR. The TADDS requires line-of-sight radio contact with the FAAR.

 

Practical Exercise

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AD0699 Edition 5 Final Examination