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Seeb International Airport
Seeb, Oman
2335'35'N 5817'54'E

Oman has six airports with permanent-surface runways, one of which has a runway over 3700 meters long. Oman's two international airports are located at Seeb (the largest) and Salalah. Air Expeditionary Force deployments to Seeb, Oman, support Operation Southern Watch. Enhanced Southern Watch activities included deployments to Prince Sultan and Eskan, Saudi Arabia; Al Jaber and Ali Al-Salem, Kuwait; Al Dhafra, United Air of Emirates; Seeb, Oman; Al Udeid, Qatar; and Shaikh Asa, Bahrain.

At present, for operations in and out of Seeb International Airport, there are no noise restrictions, airport curfews, aircraft type restrictions. Standard instrument departures route the aircraft generally over unpopulated areas. There are no specific noise abatement procedures. This is due primarily to the airport siting being remote from developed residential and industrial areas. The Government of Oman complies with ICAO recommended practices in relation to aircraft noise emissions, and is considering the environmental aspects of aircraft noise. If urban development spreads towards the airport, an appropriate plan would be formulated.

Oman, perhaps the strongest supporter of the US presence in the Gulf, signed an access agreement with the United States in 1981, an unpopular time to do so. It hosts three Air Force pre-positioning sites with support equipment for 26,000 personnel as well as required equipment and fuel to maintain three air bases.

USAF Prepositioned War Reserve Materiel (WRM) provides support to bare base systems, medical, munitions, fuels mobility support equipment, vehicles, rations, aerospace ground equipment, air base operability equipment, and associated spares and other consumables at designated locations. Responsible for asset receipt, accountability, serviceability, storage, security, periodic inspection and test, maintenance, repair, outload, and reconstitution of prepositioned WRM. Current WRM operating locations include Seeb, Thumrait, Masirah, Oman; Al Udeid, Qatar; and Manama, Bahrain.

Services under the War Reserve Materiel (WRM) contract are performed by DynCorp Technical Services at Royal Air Force of Oman (RAFO) bases at Masirah, Thumrait, and Seeb; Al Udeid, Qatar; Manama, Bahrain; and Shaw AFB, SC. DynCorp provides support to bare base systems, medical, munitions, fuels mobility support equipment, vehicles, rations, aerospace ground equipment, air base operability equipment, and associated spares and other consumables at designated locations. Responsible for asset receipt, accountability, serviceability, storage, security, periodic inspection and test, maintenance, repair, outload, and reconstitution of prepositioned WRM. This is a one year contract with an option to renew the contract. Total length of contract is seven years.

Services include maintaining war reserve materiel (WRM) stored in the Sultanate of Oman, State of Bahrain, and State of Qatar. In Oman, contract performance is on Royal Air Force of Oman (RAFO) government installations, and all access to the installations is controlled by the RAFO Security. In Bahrain, performance is in an area controlled by US Navy and Bahrain Port Authority. In Qatar, the Host Nation controls access to the work site.

War reserve materiel includes medical and munitions, warehousing of rations, and various other supplies. The contractor shall be responsible for performing all or any specifically designated portions of the functions accomplished under this contract during any wartime operations. Wartime operations are those actions, including contingency planning, which would be required to support current or any future United States Air Force wartime requirement. Emergency situations (i.e., accident and rescue operations, civil disturbances, natural disasters and military peacetime contingency operations and exercises) may necessitate the Contractor provide increased or reduced support as indicated below when required by Contracting Officer. Military contingency operations may necessitate military personnel assistance be provided to the Contractor. Should this occur, the Contractor will be relieved of responsibilities and accountability for the phase of the contract taken over by the military. Optional WRM sites may be exercised at any time during the performance of this contract. In the event the Government adds a new site to the contract, both parties to this contract hereby agree to negotiate in good faith the applicable price necessary to account for the change.

Since 1981 there has been an ongoing program to harden and upgrade Oman's key airfields, including the construction of hardened aircraft shelters (HAS), the lengthening and strengthening of runways, and development of extensive support facilities, ordnance depots and fuel dumps. The northern bases -- Seeb, Masirah and Khasab -- have been the primary focus of these projects. Seeb is the main transport and logistic base, collocated with the international airport, while Masirah supports air defence and strike/interdiction. Both host airborne surveillance over land and ocean approaches.

On September 25, 2002 a report in the Washington Post indicated that an American fighter squadron was operating out of Seeb IAP.

The Defense Energy Support Center (DESC) fueled the Coalition Forces during Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi Freedom. DESC is a Field Activity of the Defense Logistics Agency. They provide the Department of Defense and other government agencies with comprehensive energy solutions in the most effective and economical manner possible. Two Commodity Business Units supporting these operations are Direct Delivery Fuels and Bulk Fuels; both provide the war fighter comprehensive fuel support in the most effective and economical manner possible.

In support of both Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi Freedom, the US Air Force contacted Ground Fuels Division I in January 2003 regarding supply of Aviation Gasoline (AVGAS). The Air Force requested AVGAS to Seeb Air Base, Oman, in support of their Predator mission. The Predator is a medium-altitude, long-endurance unmanned aerial vehicle system utilized for reconnaissance, surveillance and target acquisition. The Air Force established Seeb Air Base as the hub for distributing AVGAS to various locations throughout the theater.

Although AVGAS is commercially available throughout most parts of the world, DESC and the Air Force Petroleum Office (AFPET) identified a supplier that was capable and willing to produce a special batch of military specification AVGAS to meet the Air Force's product specification requirement. From January to April 2003, the Ground Fuels Division I supported the Air Force by purchasing 1,119 drums of AVGAS (59,307 gallons) under five separate open market purchase contracts totaling an estimated $437,004. DESC continues to support the Air Force and its Predator mission in support of post-Iraq operations.



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