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Bolling AFB

Bolling AFB was named after Colonel Raynal C. Bolling, the first high ranking American officer to be killed in World War I. Bolling was dedicated in 1918 and at differrent points had such individuals as Billy Mitchell, Henry "Hap" Arnold, Carl Spaatz, Ira Eaker, and Jimmy Doolittle as its personnel.

Once an important airfield in the Air Force's inventory, Bolling was made into the headquarters for all Air Force operations in the National Capital Region in 1985. The "military district" concept had already been employed by the Army and Navy, with the Military District of Washington and Naval District of Washington, respectively. After setting the parameters from which the Air Force District of Washington (AFDW) would command and operate, the plan was put into motion to activate AFDW as a direct reporting unit on Bolling AFB in 1995.

In addition to the AFDW, Bolling AFB is host to a variety of organizations representing a cross-section of the Air Force, from base-level offices to Headquarters for the Office of Special investigations, the Air Force Surgeon General and the Air Force Chief of Chaplains. Bolling also serves as a diverse military community, housing families of all services and hosting one of the largest defense organizations, the Defense Intelligence Agency Center.

The mission of Bolling Field during World War 11 was threefold: 1) to supply air transportation and other services for official Washington; 2) to be ready to participate in the air defense of Washington; and 3) to supply trained men to combat organizations. General Headquarters Air Force moved into Building 410 at Boiling Field in 1941 with 46 officers and 270 enlisted peronnel, marking the beginning of field's steady expansion to support the war. By 1944, Headquarters Army Air Forces at the Pentagon housed the majority of its 2,600 personnel at Bolling. At one time during World War 11, there were 5,200 persons stationed or housed at Bolling Field. Their presence, and the many other units assigned to the field, created an immediate need for additional buildings.

Following World War II, Bolling Field, which had always been an "exempted station" responsible directly to the Head- quarters Army Air Forces and its predecessor organizations) was assigned to the Continental Air Forces, established in December 1944. It was redesignated as Strategic Air Command in March 1946. When SAC moved to Andrews Field on October 20, 1946, the Bolling Field Com mand again became an independent command. On March 19, 1948, the Bolling Field Command was redesignated Headquarters Command U.S. Air Force. Also in 1948, Bolling Field, along with the other "fields," became an Air Force Base.

By the late 1950s, the skies above Washington were becoming perilously crowded. Bolling Air Force Base and Washington National Airport, with their parallel runways just across the river from each other, were competing for air space. As a result, flight activities of all fixed-wing aircraft were transferred to nearby Andrews AFB, Maryland. Forty-four years after the dedication of Bolling Field, the last airplane departed July 1, 1962, carrying 33 passengers and six crew members bound for Andrews.

By the mid-1970s, Bolling AFB had become part of the Military Airlift Command. Throughout the next few years, Bolling would experience a series of reorganizations within MAC, at one time falling under the 89th Military Airlift Wing at Andrews AFB.

Officials soon realized that Bolling's mission was unique. The decision was made in 1985 to make Bolling the headquarters for all Air Force operations in the National Capital Region. The "military district" concept had already been employed by the Army and Navy, with the Military District of Washington and Naval District of Washington, respectively. After setting the parameters from which the Air Force District of Washington (AFDW) would command and operate, the plan was put into miotion to activate AFDW as a direct reporting unit on Bolling AFB in 1995. Today, AFDW people work proudly together to serve, support and pesent the world's best Air Force in our nation's capital.

In addition to the AFDW, Bolling AFB is host to a variety of organizations representing a cross-section of the Air Force, from base-level offices to Headquarters for the Office of Special investigations, the Air Force Surgeon General and the Air Force Chief of Chaplains. Bolling also serves as a diverse military community, housing families of all services and hosting one of the largest defense organizations, the Defense Intelligence Agency Center.

The runways of Bolling are now covered with office buildings, quarters, modern roadways and fields of grass. The old hangars that once housed Army and Air Force planes now serve as offices, shops, and warehouses.

BRAC 2005

In its 2005 BRAC Recommendations, DoD would realign Bolling AFB, DC, by relocating the installation management functions to Naval District Washington at the Washington Navy Yard, DC, establishing Joint Base Anacostia-Bolling-Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), DC.

All installations employed military, civilian, and contractor personnel to perform common functions in support of installation facilities and personnel. All installations executed these functions using similar or near similar processes. Because these installations shared a common boundary with minimal distance between the major facilities or are in near proximity, there was significant opportunity to reduce duplication of efforts with resulting reduction of overall manpower and facilities requirements capable of generating savings, which would be realized by paring unnecessary management personnel and achieving greater efficiencies through economies of scale. Intangible savings would be expected to result from opportunities to consolidate and optimize existing and future service contract requirements. Additional opportunities for savings would also be expected to result from establishment of a single space management authority capable of generating greater overall utilization of facilities and infrastructure. Further savings would be expected to result from opportunities to reduce and correctly size both owned and contracted commercial fleets of base support vehicles and equipment consistent with the size of the combined facilities and supported populations. Regional efficiencies achieved as a result of Service regionalization of installation management would provide additional opportunities for overall savings as the designated installations are consolidated under regional management structures. The quantitative military value score validated by military judgment was the primary basis for determining which installation was designated as the receiving location. Assuming no economic recovery, this recommendation could result in a maximum potential reduction of 253 jobs (150 direct jobs and 103 indirect jobs) over the 2006-2011 period in the Washington-Arlington-Alexandria, DC-VA-MD-WV Metropolitan Division economic area (less than 0.1 percent).

In another recommendation, DoD recommended to realign Defense Intelligence Analysis Center, Bolling Air Force Base, DC, by relocating select Defense Intelligence Agency intelligence analysis functions to a new facility at Rivanna Station, VA. It would also realign Crystal Park 5, a leased facility in Arlington, VA, by relocating the Defense Intelligence Agency analysis function to the Defense Intelligence Analysis Center, Bolling Air Force Base, DC. This recommendation would be a realignment of select personnel, equipment and intelligence analysis functions of the Defense Intelligence Agency. It would co-locates select intelligence analysis functions and personnel with the National Ground Intelligence Center into a new facility at Rivanna Station. This recommendation would improve information flow/mission synergy; address capacity shortage at the Defense Intelligence Analysis Center; meet the spirit of the Secretary of Defense's guidelines for relocation outside the National Capital Region, and improve Continuity of Operations (COOP)/Mission Assurance by locating functions on a secure Department of Defense-owned location. The realignment of personnel from Crystal Park 5 to the Defense Intelligence Analysis Center, Bolling Air Force Base, DC, would reduce vulnerable leased space while addressing Antiterrorism/Force Protection deficiencies by locating functions onto a secure Department of Defense-owned location. This recommendation would accommodate current and surge requirements and would be consistent with the 20-year Force Structure Plan.

The total estimated one-time cost to the Department of Defense to implement this recommendation would be $96.7M. The net of all costs and savings to the Department during the implementation period would be a cost of $48.8M. Annual recurring savings to the Department after implementation would be $10.1M with a payback expected in eight years. The net present value of the costs and savings to the Department over 20 years would be a savings of $52.8M. Assuming no economic recovery, this recommendation could result in a maximum potential reduction of 1,337 jobs (777 direct jobs and 560 indirect jobs) over the 2006-2011 period in the Washington-Arlington-Alexandria, DC-VA-MD-WV Metropolitan Division economic area (less than 0.1 percent). This recommendation would require spending approximately $0.4M for environmental compliance activities.



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