The Largest Security-Cleared Career Network for Defense and Intelligence Jobs - JOIN NOW

Military


Red Fleet - Black Sea Fleet

Dreadnought Volya (formerly Imperator Alexander III), a new dreadnought, before the occupation of Sebastopol by the Germans May 4, 1918, escaped from Sebastopol to Novorossisk, but upon the demand of the Germans she was returned to Sebastopol early in June, 1918, and was in their hands. Swobodnaya Rossiva (formerly Imperatriza Ekaterina II), likewise escaped to Novorossisk in May, 1918, but when the Germans ordered her to be delivered to them in Sevastopol in June, 1918, she was blown up by her crew and sank. Imperatriza Maria was Blown up and sunk through an internal explosion at Sevastopol, October 19, 1916, but salvage operations begun by the Russians and continued by the Germans resulted in successfully raising her in July, 1918, She was in the hands of the Germans in Sebastopol and thought to be undergoing repair. Demokratwa (formerly Imperator Nicolai I), the last of her class, was laid down at Nicolaieff in 1914 and launched October, 1916. She must have been nearly completed when she fell into the hands of the Germans upon their occupation of Nicolaieff in March, 1918.

Predreadnought battleships Rostislav, Sinop, Georgi Pobodonosete, Tei Sviatitelya, Boretz za Svobodo, loann Zlatoust, Lvstnfi fell into the hands of the Germans when they occupied Sebastopol, May 4, 1918. They were said to be flying the Ukrainian flag at the time. They were immediately unmanned, and remain at Sebastopol in the hands of the Germans.

Cruisers (light) Pamyat Mebkuriya, Ochakov, Almcal (yacht) were in the hands of the Germans at Sebastopol. Prut, formerly the Turkish cruiser Medjidieh, was sunk by a mine in the Baltic sea, April 3, 1915; she was salvaged by the Russians and renamed Prut; she fell into the hands of the Germans in Sebastopol May, 1918, and was since been turned over to Turkey, and arrived at Constantinople. Four large auxiliary cruisers also fell into the hands of the Germans at Sebastopol, May, 1918.

Light scout cruisers Admiral Lazarcff, Admiral Nakhimoff, Admiral Kornilov, Admiral Istomin were building at Nicolaieff, and fell into the hands of the Germans when they occupied that port, March 15, 1918.

Torpedo craft - At the time of the negotiation of the Treaty of Brest-Litovsk, the Black Sea Fleet included 27 destroyers, 17 of which were of large modern type, the remainder being small second-class boats with maximum speed of 14 knots. Some of these destroyers fell into the hands of the Germans upon the occupation of Sebastopol, May 4, 1918, while the remainder fled to Novorossisk. When in June the Germans demanded the return of the latter to Sevastopol, in accordance with the terms of the treaty of Brest-Litovsk, 9 or 10 were blown up by their own crews, while the remainder returned to Sebastopol in accordance with the German demands. Therefore, at least 17 or 18 of these boats were in the hands of the Germans, but no information was available to identify them. In March, 1918, four large modern destroyers building at Nicolaieff, and almost completed, also fell into the hands of the Germans upon their occupation of that port.

Submarines - At least 14, and possibly 16 submarines, comprising the whole Black Sea Flotilla, fell into the hands of the Germans at Sebastopol, May 4, 1918. There also fell into their hands at Nicolaieff, in March, 1918, two other nearly completed submarines, as well as the parts for six more, in packing cases.

Gunboats - Donetz, Terete, Rubanetz were all in the hands of the Germans at Sebastopol.

Miscellaneous - A huge number of miscellaneous auxiliaries fell into the hands of the Germans at Sevastopol, but the available information is not sufficient to give an accurate list of these.

Summary - In German hands: Built - 2 dreadnaughts, 7 battleships, 4 light cruisers, 17-18 destroyers, 14-16 submarines, 3 gunboats, miscellaneous auxiliaries. Building - 1 dreadnaught, 4 scout cruisers, 4 destroyers, 8 submarines.

It was reported that the Germans have demobilized the Russian crews of all the ships in their control, and were refitting the entire Black Sea Fleet, and manning all the ships with full complements drawn from the German Navy.




NEWSLETTER
Join the GlobalSecurity.org mailing list



 
Page last modified: 09-07-2011 13:18:07 ZULU