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Military


Luftschiff / Airships

Type L.Z.
Airship
First
flight
Length (ft.)
Diameter (ft.)
Capacity (cub.yads.)
Lift (lbs.)
Engines (H.P.)
Air Speed (ft.per sec)
ft.
Notes
A-typeLZ-1 .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ..
B-typeLZ-2 .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ..
C-typeLZ-4 .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ..
D-typeLZ-6 .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ..
E-typeLZ-7 .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ..
F-typeLZ-10 .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ..
G-typeLZ-12 .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ..
H-typeLZ-14 .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ..
I typeLZ-18 .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ..
J-typenot used
K typeLZ-21 .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ..
L-typeLZ-22 .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ..
M-type LZ-24 L.3 191 518 48 29,430 19,180 3 210 69 6,560
N-typeLZ-26 .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ..
O-typeLZ-36 L.9 .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ..
P-type LZ-38 L.10 191 536 61 41,725 34,390 4 210 85 9,185
Q-type LZ-59 L.20 191 585.5 61 46,825 39,240 4 240 84 10,500
R-type LZ-62 L.30 191 643 78 71,940 62,830 6 240 88 12,470
S-typeLZ-91 L.42 .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ..
T-typeLZ-93 L.44 .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ..
U-typeLZ-95 L.48 .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ..
V-type LZ-100 L.53 191 643 78 73,050 87,300 5 240 100 19,680
W-typeLZ-102 L.57 .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ..
X-type LZ-112 L.70 191 743 78 89,595 112,435 6 260 111 21,650
Y-typeLZ-120 .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ..
L.100 191 781 96 141,260 180,780 10 260 121 30,180 (Planned)
126-typeLZ-126 .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ..
127-typeLZ-127 .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ..
129-typeLZ-129 .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ..
Typen Production number Name / tactical numberingFirst flight Notes
A-typeLZ-1 ZEPPELIN-I July 2, 1900 Experimental airship. Two Mercedes engines; two pairsof twin- screws. Trim first controlled by a movable weight; later through lifting planes. Made only two short ascents after which the air ship collapsed in her floating shed on Lake Constance, dismantled in 1902.
B-typeLZ-2 ZEPPELIN-II January 17, 1906 Experimental airship. Two Mercedes engines; two pairs of twin- screws. Made a short ascent and landed near Kieslegg (Switzerland) where she was subsequently wrecked on her moorings by a storm.
B-typeLZ-3 Z I October 9, 1906 Experimental airship. Two Mercedes engines; two pairs of twin-screws. Best endurance: 340 km. in 7 hrs. Was re-built and sold to the Prussian Army in 1908 after refitting; used as a school ship. Prussian Army airship had two Maybach engines; two pairs of twin-screws. This power-plant and drive became typical of all Zeppelin airships built prior to the Great War; Best altitude: 1,720 M. Remained six years in commission; decommissioned in 1913.
C-typeLZ-4 June 20 1908 Experimental airship. Best endurance : 417 km. in 11 hrs. Destroyed through spontaneous combustion during an electrical storm, while moored at Echterdingen, on 08 August 1908.
C-typeLZ5 Z II May 26, 1909 Prussian Army airship. Best endurance: 970 km. in 37 hrs. Made a trip of 150 km. after her three bow compartments had been taken off upon the airship colliding with a tree. Was destroyed by a storm while moored near Weilburg, on April 24th, 1910.
D-typeLZ-6 August 25, 1909 Passenger airship, first experiments with wireless communication;.-Fitted with a cabin-car. First DELAG craft. Placed under charter of the Delag Line [Deutsche Luftschiffahrt Aktien-Gesellschaft, Frankfort-on-the-Main.] after the loss of the Deutschland. Best endurance: 450 km. in 17 hrs. Was re-built and a third engine was mounted, first on the cabin-car (driving a third pair of twin-screws), then on the stern- car in a twin unit, each engine driving one of the stern twin-screws. Made 73 trips aggregating 9,145 km. Was destroyed by a fire, in her shed at Baden-Oos, on Sept. 14th, 1910.
E-typeLZ-7 "Deutschland" June 19, 1910 Passenger airship of the Delag Line.-Cabin-car seating 20; crew of 8. Best endurance: 540 km. in 9 hrs. On her 7th trip the airship ran into a storm on June 28, 1910 and stranded for lack of fuel in the Teutoburg Forest. None was injured, but she was damaged beyond repair.
E-typeLZ-8 Ersatz "Deutschland" March 30, 1911 Passenger airship of the Delag Line. Three engines of a more powerful type. Made only 2 trips. Was wrecked on May 16th, 1911, by being blown against the airship shed of Diisseldorf by strong wind and damaged beyond repair.
E-typeLZ-9 Ersatz Z II October 2, 1911 Prussian Army airship. Best endurance (trials) : 20 hrs. Was re- built in 1912. Turning circle: 680-700 meters. Decommissioned August 1, 1914
F-typeLZ-10 "Schwaben" June 26, 1911 Passenger airship of the Delag Line. Made 229 [ 224 ?] trips aggregating 27,570 km. [27,321 km ?], on which 4,545 [4,354?] passengers were carried. Turning circle: 650 meters. Was destroyed through spontaneous combustion after her hull had been damaged by the wind at the Duisseldorf airship shed, on June 28th, 1912.
F-typeLZ-11 "Viktoria Luise" February 19, 1912 Passenger airship of the Delag Line. Best endurance: 560 km. in 12 hrs. Made up to 384 [ 489 ] trips, aggregating 46,284 km. [54,312 km?], on which 8,134 [9,783?] passengers were carried. Turning circle: 550 meters. Was chartered in 1914 upon outbreak of World War I by the German Navy to serve as a training airship. Broke apart while being "halled in" on October 8, 1915.
G-typeLZ-12 Z IIIApril 25, 1912 decommissioned August 1, 1914
G-typeLZ-13 "Hansa" July 30, 1912 Passenger airship of the Delag Line. Best endurance : 700 km. in 10 1/2 hrs Made up to Oct. 31st. 1913, 297 [ 399?] trips, aggregating 34,166 km. [44,437 km ?], on which 6,217 passengers were carried. First regular flight outside Germany (to Denmark and Sweden); Was chartered by the German Navy in 1914 upon outbreak of World War I to serve as a training airship; decommissioned in summer 1916.
H-typeLZ-14 L 1 October 7, 1912 First German naval airship. New type. Four Maxims on the cars, one on the roof near the how. Wireless carrying 300 kin. Best endurance: 1,900 km. in 31 hrs. with a crew of 21. Foundered in a thunderstorm on Sept. 9th, 1913 off Helgoland. Pushed down into the North Sea with 13 [14 ?] of the crew drowning . This was the first Zeppelin incident in which fatalities occurred.
H-typeLZ-15 Ersatz Z I January 16, 1913 Prussian Army airship. Four maxims on the cars. Best endurance: 16-1/2 hrs. Was destroyed by a storm on her moorings [ in a forced landing?] near Karlsruhe on March 19th, 1913.
H-typeLZ-16 Z IV March 14, 1913 Prussian Army airship. LZ.15 type. Best endurance 18 1/2 hrs.; altitude: 2,000 M. Accidentally crossed French border on April 3, 1913 in misty weather and was kept in Lunville for one day. Performed some reconnaissance missions in World War I and attempted bombing of Warsaw and Lyck. Used as a school ship from 1915; decommissioned in autumn of 1916
H-typeLZ-17 "Sachsen" May 3, 1913 Passenger airship of the Delag Line. Made up to Oct. 31st, 1913, 206 [419 ?] trips, aggregating 21,683 km. [39,919 km?], on which 2,698 [9837 ?] passengers were carried. Was rebuilt and re-engined in 1914 when she was chartered by the German Navy upon outbreak of World War I to serve as a training airship; decommissioned in autumn of 1916.
I-typeLZ-18 L 2 September 9, 1913 German naval airship. New type : gangway within the hull, pilot-car in front of the two engine-cars which contained two engines each. 19 compartments. Wireless carrying 500 km. Best endurance: 1,000 km. in 13 hrs. Was destroyed through spontaneous combustion [by an exploding engine ?] during a test flight on Oct. 17th, 1913, over Johannisthal. The crew of 17 and a testing commission of 11 were killed.
H-typeLZ-19 Second Ersatz Z I June 6, 1913 Prussian Army airship. LZ.15 type. Designed endurance: 20 hrs. Best endurance: 1,100 km. in 19 hrs. Was destroyed by a thunderstorm while moored at Thionville (Alsace) on June [April?] 13th, 1914.
H-typeLZ-20 Z V July 8, 1913 Prussian Army airship. LZ.15 type.. Best endurance: 20 hrs. Was re-built like the Sachsen. In the Great War the Z. V performed on the Russian front and used for reconnaissance missions in western Poland; On Sept. 28th, 1914, seh made a forced landing after an attack during the Battle of Tannenberg; she was shot down near Warsaw. Her crew was captured by enemy cavalry while trying to burn down the ship.
K-typeLZ-21 Z VI November 10, 1913Prussian Army airship. LZ.15 type. Was being re-built at the outbreak of the war like the Z I. In World War I mainly used in Belgium as a bomber; damaged beyond repair during a bombing of Lige on August 6, 1914.
L-typeLZ-22 Z VIIJanuary 8, 1914 Prussian Army airship. Improved LZ.14 type. Was hit by infantry fire during reconnaissance mission in Alsace on August 21, 1914 and damaged beyond repair in subsequent forced landing in St. Quirin , Lorraine
L-typeLZ-23 Z VIII May 11, 1914 Prussian Army airship, same orders as Z VII. Improved LZ.14 type. Best altitude : 2645 m. Was shot down by French gunners on August 22nd [21?], 1914, near Badonciller (Lorraine). Forced landing behind enemy lines; captured and plundered by French army. Part of the crew were killed.
M-typeLZ-24 L 3 May 11, 1914 German naval airship. Improved LZ.18 type. No special pilot-car, nor masked gangway however. Best endurance: 35 hrs.; altitude: 2,700 meters. Conducted 24 reconnaissance missions over the North Sea; participated in the first raid of England on January 20, 1915. Stranded in a storm on Feb. 17th, 1915, near Esbjerg (Denmark) after a forced landing (due to engine failure) and was scuttled by her commander, also was subsequently interned with the crew.
M-typeLZ-25 Z IX July 13, 1914 Prussian Army airships of the improved LZ.14 type used for reconnaissance missions and bombings in northern France; destroyed by English bomber in its hall in Dsseldorf on October 8, 1914.The bomber was a single-seat Sopwith Tabloid flown by Flt Lt Reginald Marix, RNAS (later Air Vice Marshal); he had flown from Antwerp and the raid was the first strategic bombing raid by an aeroplane.
N-typeLZ-26 Z XII December 14, 1914Conducted 11 attacks in northern France and at the eastern front, dropping 20,000 kg bombs; decommissioned on August 8, 1917.
M-typeLZ-27 L 4 August 18, 1914 An improved L.14 type. Built at Friedrichshafen. Vessels of this type were built in large numbers until the summer of 1915, when the new type of Army airship was produced. Conducted 11 reconnaissance missions over the North Sea; participated in the first raid of England on January 20, 1915. Forced landing in Blavandshuk on February 17, 1915 due to a storm; the crew was taken captive, with four members reported missing in action.
M-typeLZ-28 L 5 September 22, 1914 Conducted 47 reconnaissance missions over North and Baltic Sea; proved especially useful in discovering enemy mines; two attack missions, dropping 700 kg bombs; damaged beyond repair by Russian air defence on August 7, 1915
M-typeLZ-29 Z X October 13, 1914 Conducted two attacks on Calais and Paris, dropping 1800 kg bombs; on way back damaged by enemy fire and dismantled after forced landing in St. Quirin
M-typeLZ-30 Z XI November 15, 1914 Conducted raids on Warsaw, Grodno and other targets near the eastern front. Destroyed in an accident on May 20, 1915
M-typeLZ-31 L 6 November 3, 1914 Played a prominent role in repelling a British Navy attack on German coast on December 25, 1914; 36 reconnaissance missions around North Sea, including marking of mine fields; one successful raid on England, dropping 700 kg bombs. Took fire during refilling of gas in its hall at Fuhlsbuttel and burnt down together with L 9 on September 16, 1916.
M-typeLZ-32 L 7 November 20, 1914 Conducted 77 reconnaissance missions over the North Sea; several unsuccessful attempts to attack English coast. Brought down by British cruiser fire from HMS Phaeton and HMS Galatea and destroyed by British submarine E 31 on May 4, 1916
M-typeLZ-33 L 8 December 17, 1914 Conducted reconnaissance missions along the western front; damaged by enemy fire during a patrol mission, it stranded south of Ostend on March 5, 1915
M-typeLZ-34 January 6, 1915 Conducted two raids at the eastern front, dropping 1110 kg bombs; heavily damaged by enemy fire on June 21, 1915, burnt down following forced landing near Insterburg.
M-typeLZ-35 January 11, 1915 Conducted two raids on Paris and Poperinghe (Belgium), dropping 2420 kg bombs; forced landing near Aeltre (Belgium) due to heavy damage by enemy fire, then destroyed by a storm.
O-typeLZ-36 L 9 March 8, 1915 Conducted 74 reconnaissance missions in the North Sea; four raids on England dropping 5683 kg bombs; several attacks on British submarines. Burned down in its hall on September 16, 1916 together with L 6.
M-typeLZ-37 March 4, 1915 Was shot down by Flt Sub-Lt Rex Warneford, 1 Sqdn RNAS, flying a Morane-Saulnier Type L, during its first raid on Calais on June 7, 1915. Warneford was awarded a Victoria Cross
P-typeLZ-38 April 3, 1915 Achieved first bombing raid on London on May 31, 1915 five successful raids on Harwich, Ramsgate, Southend (twice) and London, dropping 8360 kg bombs. Destroyed by British bombing in its hall in Brussels.
O-typeLZ-39 April 24, 1915 Conducted three raids at the western, later two at the eastern front, dropping 4184 kg bombs in total. Heavily damaged by enemy fire on December 17, 1915 and decommissioned upon forced landing
P-typeLZ-40 L 10 May 13, 1915 Conducted 8 reconnaissance missions around the North Sea; 5 attacks on England dropping 9900 kg bombs. Destroyed in a thunderstorm on September 3, 1915 near Cuxhaven
P-typeLZ-41 L 11 June 7, 1915 31 reconnaissance missions, notably during the Battle of Jutland; 12 raids on England dropping 15,543 kg bombs. Decommissioned on April 25, 1916
P-typeLZ-42 LZ72 June 15, 1915 Was only used as a school ship, as skeleton metal was of poor quality; decommissioned in February 1917. The German Army used the letter "Z" (Zeppelin), but later used the "LZ" symbol, except that beginning with LZ-72, the numeral was 30 units ahead of the building number (LZ-42), evidently to mislead the Allies.
P-typeLZ-43 L 12 June 21, 1915 Conducted 5 reconnaissance missions; towed back to Ostend after taking heavy damage in a raid on London, Harwich and the Humber region on August 10, 1915 but burned down during subsequent disassembly.
P-typeLZ-44 LZ74 July 8, 1915 Conducted two attacks on England dropping 3500 kg bombs; dismantled after it crashed into a mountain in misty weather on October 8, 1915.
P-typeLZ-45 L 13 July 23, 1915 Conducted 45 reconnaissance missions; 15 attacks on England dropping 20,667 kg bombs; decommissioned on April 25 1917
P-typeLZ-46 L 14 August 9, 1915 Was most successful German Navy airship; 42 reconnaissance missions; 17 attacks on England dropping 22,045 kg bombs; no longer used in 1917 and 1918. Destroyed by its crew on June 23, 1919.
P-typeLZ-47 LZ77 August 24, 1915 Conducted 6 attacks on England and France dropping 12,610 kg bombs. Destroyed by enemy fire on February 21, 1916 in the Battle of Verdun.
P-typeLZ-48 L 15 September 9, 1915 Conducted 8 reconnaissance missions; 3 attacks on England dropping 5780 kg bombs. Damaged by ground fire from Dartford AA battery during a raid on London on April 1, 1916, it was stranded at Knock Deep in the Thames estuary and 17 members of the crew were captured, one having died.
P-typeLZ-49 LZ79 August 2, 1915 Dropped 4440 kg in two attacks on Brest-Litovsk and Kovel and one attack on Paris on January 30, 1916; thereby hit by French fire and damaged beyond repair in forced landing near Ath.
P-typeLZ-50 L 16 September 23, 1915 Conducted 44 reconnaissance missions; 12 attacks on England dropping 18,048 kg bombs; delivered supplies to German isles in winter 1916. Damaged beyond repair in a forced landing near Brunsbttel on October 19, 1917.
P-typeLZ-51 LZ81 October 7, 1915 Used at the South-Eastern and the Western Front; transported a diplomatic commission over enemy Serbia on November 9, 1915; one attack on Etables (France) and two attacks on Bucharest, dropping 4513 kg bombs in total; stranded near Turnovo ( Bulgaria) on September 27, 1916
P-typeLZ-52 L 18 November 3, 1915 Was destroyed in shed fire at Tondem during refilling on November 17, 1915
P-typeLZ-53 L 17 October 20, 1915 Conducted 27 reconnaissance missions; 9 attacks on England dropping 10,724 kg bombs. Destroyed in its hall on December 28, 1916 when LZ69 "L 24" broke its back and took fire across the hall's entrance.
P-typeLZ-54 L 19 November 27, 1915Conducted one raid on England on January 31, 1916, dropping 1600 kg bombs; with three engines failing, it afterwards came under dutch fire and sank in the North Sea, drowning all crewmembers as nearby English fish trawler "King Stephen" refused any help to them.
P-typeLZ-55 LZ85 September 12, 1915 Conducted 6 attacks dropping 14,200 kg on Dnaburg ( Latvia), Minsk, the railroads of Riga, and Saloniki (three times); damaged by fire from Battleship HMS Agamemnon on May 5, 1916, it stranded in the Wardar marshes
P-typeLZ-56 LZ86 October 10, 1915Conducted 7 attacks dropping 14,800 kg bombs along the Eastern and South-Eastern front; crashed on September 3, 1916 when the fore and aft nacelle broke away from the ships hull after a raid.
P-typeLZ-57 LZ87 December 6, 1915 Conducted 2 attacks on Ramsgate and Margate dropping 3000 kg bombs; in July 1916 handed to the German Navy; 16 reconnaissance missions around the Baltic Sea; later used as a school ship. Decommissioned in July 1917.
P-typeLZ-58 LZ88/L 25 November 14, 1915 Conducted 14 reconnaissance missions; 3 attacks dropping 4249 kg bombs along the Western Front; In February, 1917, the Prussian Army decided to discontinue the use of Zeppelin airships. In January 1917 handed to the German Navy who used it for experimenting. Decommissioned in September 1917.
Q-typeLZ-59 L 20 November 21, 1915 Conducted 6 reconnaissance missions; 2 attacks on England dropping 2864 kg bombs; ran out of fuel after second attack on May 4, 1916 and stranded near Stavanger ( Norway). The crew was taken into custody; Kapitnleutnant Stabbert escaped six months later.
P-typeLZ-60 LZ90 January 1, 1916 Conducted 4 attacks on Bar-le-Duc, Norwich, London and Etables , dropping 8860 kg bombs; on November 7, 1916 torn away towards the North Sea in a storm and never seen again.
Q-typeLZ-61 L 21 January 10, 1916 Conducted 17 reconnaissance missions; 10 attacks on England dropping 14,442 kg bombs; intercepted and destroyed by English fighter pilot firing phosphor shells off Lowestoft on November 28, 1916.
R-typeLZ-62 L 30 May 28, 1916 First of the "Super-Zeppelin" Class. 10 raids on England dropping 23,305 kg bombs (however causing limited damage due to poor sight); 31 reconnaissance missions above the North and Baltic Sea and at the Eastern Front; retired on November 17, 1917. In 1920 ordered to be transferred to Belgium in the context of war reparations, where it was disassembled.
P-typeLZ-63 LZ93 February 23, 1916 Conducted three attacks on Dunkirk, Mardick and Harwich, dropping 3240 kg bombs. Decommissioned in 1917.
Q-typeLZ-64 L 22 March 3, 1916 Conducted 30 reconnaissance missions; 8 attacks on England, dropping 9215 kg bombs; destroyed by British Curtis H12 Flying Boat flown by Flight Commander Robert Leckie RNAS (later Air Vice Marshal) near Terschelling on May 14, 1917 during a reconnaissance mission. (See LZ112/L70)
Q-typeLZ-65 LZ95 February 1, 1916 Destroyed by French anti-air fire on February 21, 1915 during an attempted attack on Vitry-le-Franois .
Q-typeLZ-66 L 23 April 8, 1916 Conducted 51 reconnaissance missions; 3 attacks on England dropping 5254 kg bombs; destroyed on August 21, 1917 by English fighter pilot starting from the cruiser "Yarmouth".
Q-typeLZ-67 LZ97 April 4, 1916 Conducted 4 attacks on London (twice), Boulogne and, later, Bucharest, dropping 5760 kg bombs, plus several unsuccessful flights in bad weather. Decommissioned on July 5, 1917.
Q-typeLZ-68 LZ98 April 28, 1916 Conducted one attack on London dropping 1513 kg bombs, plus several flights aborted due to bad weather; handed to the German Navy in November 1916; 15 reconnaissance missions around the Baltic Sea. Decommissioned in August 1917.
Q-typeLZ-69 L 24 May 20, 1916 Conducted 19 reconnaissance missions around the North Sea; 4 raids on England dropping 8510 kg bombs; crashed into a wall while being "halled in" on December 28, 1916 and burned down together with LZ53 "L17".
-typeLZ-70 not built. In 1942 Time Magazine reported that "The rumor is rife that the Nazis intend to load up the Graf Zeppelin and the LZ-70 with planes, ship them west for token bombing raids on the US.
Q-typeLZ-71 LZ101 June 29, 1916 Was stationed in Yambol ( Bulgaria); 7 attacks dropping 11,934 kg bombs on Bucharest, Ciulnita , Fetesti, Galati, Odessa, Mytilene, Jassy and Mudros . Disassembled in September 1917.
R-typeLZ-72 L 31 July 12, 1916 Conducted one important reconnaissance mission in fleet operation against Sunderland; 6 attacks on England dropping 19,411 kg bombs; intercepted and destroyed by British fighter pilot on September 24, 1916 near Potters Bar, North of London, while commanded by the leading airship commander of the time, Kapitan Leutnant Helmut Mathy, who perished with his entire crew.
R-typeLZ-73 LZ103 August 23, 1916Conducted one successful attack on Calais dropping 1530 kg bombs (several other attacks being cancelled or aborted due to poor weather); decommissioned in August 1917
R-typeLZ-74 L 32 August 4, 1916 Conducted one important reconnaissance mission in fleet operation against Sunderland; three attacks on England dropping 6860 kg bombs; intercepted and destroyed by British fighter pilot on September 24, 1916 near Burstead, Essex.
R-typeLZ-75 L 37 November 9, 1916 Conducted 17 reconnaissance missions around the North and Baltic Sea and England; 4 raids dropping 6450 kg bombs; retired on December 24, 1917; transferred to Japan in 1920 (disassembled)
R-typeLZ-76 L 33 August 30, 1916 Made a forced landing near Brentwood, Essex during a raid in which 3200 kg bombs had been dropped; though the crew burned down the hull, British engineers examined the skeleton and later used the plans as a basis for the construction of airship R 34
Q-typeLZ-77 LZ107 October 16, 1916 Conducted one attack on Boulogne, France, dropping 1440 kg bombs (several other raids being cancelled or aborted). Decommissioned in July 1917.
R-typeLZ-78 L 34 September 22, 1916Conducted three reconnaissance missions; two attacks on England dropping 3890 kg bombs; intercepted and destroyed by British fighter pilot off Hartlepool on November 28, 1916.
R-typeLZ-79 L 41 January 15, 1917 Conducted 15 reconnaissance missions around the North Sea; four attacks on England dropping 6567 kg bombs; used as a school ship from December 11, 1917 on. Destroyed by its crew on June 23, 1919.
R-typeLZ-80 L 35 October 20, 1916 Conducted 13 reconnaissance missions around the North and Baltic Sea; three attacks on England dropping 4,284 kg bombs; decommissioned in September 1918.
Q-typeLZ-81 LZ111 December 20, 1916 not used in the German Army and transferred to Navy in May 1917; 7 reconnaissance missions around the Baltic Sea. Decommissioned on August 10, 1917.
R-typeLZ-82 L 36 November 1, 1916 Conducted 20 flights around the North Sea and England, including four reconnaissance missions; damaged during landing in fog at Rehben-an-der-Aller on February 7, 1917 and decommissioned.
R-typeLZ-83 LZ113 February 22, 1917 Conducted 15 reconnaissance missions around the Eastern Front and the Baltic Sea; three attacks dropping 6000 kg bombs. In 1920 ordered to be transferred to France in the context of war reparations.
R-typeLZ-84 L 38 November 22, 1916 Was damaged beyond repair in a forced landing (due to heavy snowfall) during an attempted raid on Reval and Petersburg on December 29, 1916
R-typeLZ-85 L 45 April 12, 1917Conducted 12 reconnaissance missions around the North Sea; 3 attacks on England dropping 4700 kg bombs. Ran out of fuel on October 20, 1917; destroyed in forced landing near Sisteron, France, the crew being taken captive.
R-typeLZ-86 L 39 December 11, 1916 two reconnaissance missions around the North Sea; one attack on England dropping 300 kg bombs, and on return destroyed by French flak fire near Compigne on March 17, 1917.
R-typeLZ-87 L 47 May 11, 1917 18 reconnaissance missions and three attacks dropping 3240 kg bombs around the North Sea and England. On January 5, 1918, a giant explosion in the air base in Ahlhorn destroyed four Zeppelins (including L 47) and one non-Zeppelin-type airship, distributed over 3 halls. This is supposed to have been an accident, though sabotage could not be ruled out.
R-typeLZ-88 L 40 January 3, 1917 6 reconnaissance missions; 2 attacks on England, dropping 3105 kg bombs (large parts of which missed their targets). Damaged beyond repair in a failed landing on June 16, 1917 in Nordholz .
R-typeLZ-89 L 50 June 9, 1917 5 reconnaissance missions around the North Sea; two attacks on England dropping 4135 kg bombs. Ran out of fuel on October 20, 1917 and was driven to the Mediterranean Sea after a forced landing near Dammartin, France.
R-typeLZ-90 LZ120 January 31, 1917 17 reconnaissance missions and 3 attacks dropping 11,250 kg bombs around the Eastern Front and the Baltic Sea. Retired on October 8, 1917; in 1920 ordered to be transferred to Italy in the context of war reparations, where it broke apart one year later while gas was removed.
S-typeLZ-91 L 42 February 21, 1917 First of the "Height-Climber" class, which had a lightened structure to improve altitude. The strength of the structure was therefore compromised, which proved disastrous when unwittingly copied, as with the British R38, and USS "Shenandoah". 20 reconnaissance missions; 4 attacks on England dropping 6030 kg bombs; used as a school ship from June 6, 1918 on. Destroyed by its crew on June 23, 1919.
S-typeLZ-92 L 43 March 6, 1917 6 reconnaissance missions; one attack on English docks, dropping 1850 kg bombs. Shot down by British fighter aircraft on June 14, 1917 during reconnaissance mission.
T-typeLZ-93 L 44 April 1, 1917 8 reconnaissance missions; 4 attacks on England and British Navy units. Driven south to France by a heavy storm, it was shot down above Lunville on October 20, 1917.
T-typeLZ-94 L 46 April 24, 1917 19 reconnaissance missions around the North Sea; 3 raids on England dropping 5700 kg bombs. Destroyed in the Ahlhorn explosion (see LZ87 "L 47").
U-typeLZ-95 L 48 May 22, 1917 one reconnaissance mission; intercepted and destroyed by enemy fighter aircraft over sea near Yarmouth during attempted attack.
U-typeLZ-96 L 49 June 13, 1917 two reconnaissance missions around the North Sea; one raid on England dropping 2100 kg bombs; while returning, forced to land near Bourbonne les Bains on October 20, 1917 and captured almost undamaged by French forces. Plans derived from LZ96 were later used in the United States for construction of the first US "zeppelin", the USS Shenandoah (ZR-1).
U-typeLZ-97 L 51 June 6, 1917 3 reconnaissance missions; one raid on the English coast, dropping 280 kg bombs. Destroyed in the Ahlhorn explosion (see LZ87 "L 47").
U-typeLZ-98 L 52 July 14, 1917 20 reconnaissance missions; accidentally placed above London by an unexpected storm during a raid, it dropped 2020 kg bombs there. Destroyed by its crew on June 23, 1919.
U-typeLZ-99 L 54 August 13, 1917 14 reconnaissance missions; two attacks on England dropping 5840 kg bombs; destroyed together with L 60 when seven British Sopwith Camel fighters from the first aircraft carrier, HMS Furious, bombed the halls in Tondern. (Only two fighters returned to the Furious, though three of the others landed in Denmark after running low on fuel.)
V-typeLZ-100 L 53 August 8, 1917 19 reconnaissance missions; 4 attacks on England, dropping 11,930 kg bombs. Intercepted and destroyed by British Sopwith Camel N6812 flown by Lt Culley RAF, who took off from a lighter towed by the Destroyer HMS Redoubt, on August 11, 1918
V-typeLZ-101 L 55 September 1, 1917 Two attacks dropping 5450 kg bombs. Heavily damaged in the second one on October 19, 1917, it drifted behind western front and rose to Zeppelin all-time world record altitude of 7600 m to escape; then dismantled upon forced landing.
W-typeLZ-102 L 57 September 26, 1917 L 57 was not used in combat; foreseen for engagement in Africa. Damaged beyond repair by heavy wind on October 7, 1917.
V-typeLZ-103 L 56 September 24, 1917 Flew 17 reconnaissance missions; participated in the last raid on England on August 6, 1918. Destroyed by its crew on June 23, 1919.
W-typeLZ-104 L 59 October 10, 1917 L 59 was stationed in Jamboli ( Bulgaria). In many respects the most remarkable achievement of airships in the war was the voyage of L59 in the autumn of 1917. This was a naval ship, but the service in question was overland. Starting from Yamboli in Bulgaria the attempt was made to reach von LettowVorbeck in E. Africa to reinforce German troops with medical and other small and valuable stores. This ship did not arrive in time and was recalled by wireless after passing Khartum. L 59 returned safely upon reports of German defeat, thereby breaking a long-distance flight record ( 6757 km in 95-96 hours). The record for endurance, however, was held by LZ120 (101 hours). L 59 mounted one attack on Italy dropping 6350 kg bombs. Crashed during a raid on Malta on April 7, 1918 for unknown reasons.
V-typeLZ-105 L 58 October 29, 1917 Flew two reconnaissance missions; destroyed in the Ahlhorn explosion (see LZ87 "L 47")
V-typeLZ-106 L 61 December 12, 1917Flew 9 reconnaissance missions; two attacks on England dropping 4500 kg bombs; in 1920 ordered to be transferred to Italy in the context of war reparations.
V-typeLZ-107 L 62 January 19, 1918 Flew two reconnaissance missions; two attacks on England dropping 5923 kg bombs; crashed north of Helgoland on May 10, 1918 for unknown reasons
V-typeLZ108 L 60 December 18, 1917 Flew 11 reconnaissance missions; one attack on England dropping 3120 kg bombs; destroyed together with L 54 when British fighters bombed the halls.
V-typeLZ-109 L 64 March 11, 1918 Flew 13 reconnaissance missions over the North Sea; one attack on England dropping 2800 kg bombs. In 1920 ordered to be transferred to England in the context of war reparations, where it was disassembled.
V-typeLZ-110 L 63 March 4, 1918 L 63 dropped 8915 kg bombs in three attacks on England, including participation in the last raid on England on August 6, 1918. Destroyed by its crew on June 23, 1919.
V-typeLZ-111 L 65 April 17, 1918 L 65 participated in last raid on England on August 6, 1918. Destroyed by its crew on June 23, 1919.
X-typeLZ-112 L 70 July 1, 1918 L 70 directed last raid on England on August 6, 1918, with KK Peter Strasser, Commander of the Navy Airship Department on board; intercepted and destroyed over North Sea by British DH-4 flown by Major Edgar Cadbury with Captain Robert Leckie (later Air Vice-Marshal) as gunner. See LZ64/L22: Leckie shot down two Zeppelins Encyclopdia Britannica says "The finest of the zeppelins was the LZ-70; this craft was 220 metres (720 feet) long, was able to fly above 4,900 metres (16,000 feet), and had a range of 12,000 km (7,500 miles). The LZ-70 was shot down late in the war, however, and large rigid (metal-framed) airships were never again employed as combat aircraft." Other sources report "The destruction of the LZ-70, Germany's most advanced Zeppelin (top speed 82 mph), on 5 August 1918 by the British, virtually ended the use of airships during World War I."
X-typeLZ-113 L 71 July 29, 1918 L 71 was not used in war; in 1920 ordered to be transferred to England in the context of war reparations, where it was disassembled.
X-typeLZ-114 L 72; in France: "Dixmude" February 9, 1920 L 72 was not delivered because war ended; in 1920 ordered to be transferred to France in the context of war reparations. Vanished over Mediterranean, 1921.
-typeLZ-115 not realized
-typeLZ-116 not realized
-typeLZ-117 not realized
-typeLZ-118 not realized
-typeLZ-119 not realized
Y-typeLZ-120"Bodensee"; in Italy: "Esperia" August 20, 1919 LZ-120 included a first-class passenger section; used by DELAG until 1921, then ordered to be transferred to Italy in the context of war reparations.
Y-typeLZ-121"Nordstern"; in France: "Mditerrane" June 13, 1921LZ-121 was intended for regular flights to Stockholm; ordered to be transferred to France in the context of war reparations.
-typeLZ-122 not built
-typeLZ-123 not built
-typeLZ-124 not built, Length: 235 meters; Diameter: 29 meters; Volume: 100,000 cubic meters
-typeLZ-125 not built
126-typeLZ-126 ZR-3 "USS Los Angeles" August 27, 1924 LZ-126 was ordered by the United States; transferred from Friedrichshafen to Lakehurst in 81 hours and 2 minutes, arriving on October 15, 1924, 9:52. Most successful US airship. Dismantled in August 1940.
127-typeLZ-127 "Graf Zeppelin" September 18, 1928 The LZ-127 was the most successful airship in history; regular flights to North and South America; world tour in 1929, Arctic trip in 1931. Destroyed in 1940 upon order of Hermann Gring.
127-typeLZ-128 Project intended to supplement the successful "Graf Zeppelin" by another, similar Zeppelin. But the disastrous accident of the British passenger airship R101 in 1931 led the Zeppelin company to reconsider the safety of hydrogen-filled vessels, and the design was abandoned in favor of the LZ129 project, eventually named the Hindenburg, which was intended to be filled with helium. abandoned in favour of LZ129
129-typeLZ-129 "Hindenburg" March 4, 1936The "Hindenburg" was intended for filling with helium gas instead of flammable hydrogen, which was, however, not made available. Regular travelling to North and South America. Destroyed in Lakehurst disaster on May 6, 1937.
129-typeLZ-130 "Graf Zeppelin II" September 14, 1938The "Graf Zeppelin II" conducted test flights only, as still no helium could be obtained and filling with hydrogen was considered unacceptable after Hindenburg disaster. Destroyed in 1940 upon order of Hermann Gring.
-typeLZ-131 not finished
-typeLZ-132 not built




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