Find a Security Clearance Job!

Military


V-22 Osprey

Specifications
Primary function Amphibious assault transport of troops, equipment and supplies from assault ships and land bases
Prime Contractor(s) Boeing Defense and Space Group, Philadelphia, PA
Bell Helicopter Textron, Ft Worth, TX
Allison Engine Company, Indianapolis, IN
DescriptionThe V-22 Osprey is a multi-engine, dual-piloted, self-deployable, medium lift, vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL) tiltrotor aircraft designed for combat, combat support, combat service support, and Special Operations missions worldwide. It will replace the Corps' aged fleet of CH-46E and CH-53D medium lift helicopters
Variants
  • MV-22B Osprey - Standard naval production variant with ramp gun
  • MV-22C Osprey - Upgrade program with nose gun pod, avionics upgrade, and countermeasures upgrade for MV-22B
  • CV-22 is utilized by the Air Force for their Special Operations missions maintaining maximum commonality with the MV-22. Aircraft avionics peculiar to the Air Force unique mission requirements constitute aircraft differences.
  • CV-22B Osprey - Standard air force production variant with ramp gun
  • CV-22C Osprey - Upgrade program with nose gun pod, avionics upgrade, and countermeasures upgrade for CV-22B
  • HV-22 is used by the Navy the for Combat Search and Rescue and fleet logistics support.
  • UV-22 Army Variant - cancelled
  • Length 57' 4" - Spread
    63' 0" - Folded
    Width 84' 7" - Spread
    18' 5" - Folded
    38 feet 1 inch - Individual Tilt-rotor Diameter
    Height 22' 1" - Spread
    18' 1" - Folded
    Weights 33,140 lb (15,032) Empty weight
    52,600 lbs (23,860 kg) Takeoff, Vertical Takeoff/Landing (VTOL)
    57,000 lbs (24,948 kg) Takeoff, Short Takeoff/Landing (STOL)
    60,500 lbs (27,443 kg) Takeoff, Self Deploy STO (Maximum Take-Off)
    10,000 lbs (4,536 kg) Cargo hook, single
    15,000 lbs (6,804 kg) Cargo hook, dual
    Max fuel capacity2,037 gal/13,850 lbs

    1,228 gals (4,649 liters) Sponsons
    787 gals (2,979 liters) Wing
    2,436 gals (9,221 liters) Aux, self-deployment
    PropulsionTwo AE1107C Rolls-Royce Allison @ 6,150 shp (4,586 kW)
    Transmissions Takeoff {USMC}, 4,570 shp (3,408 kW)
    Takeoff {USN}, 4,970 shp (3,706 kW)
    Takeoff {USAF}, 4,970 shp (3,706 kW)
    1 engine inoperative, 5,920 shp (4,415 kW)
    Range 200nm Pre-Assault Raid with 18 troops
    200nm Land Assault with 24 troops
    50 nm (x2) Amphibious Assault
    500 nm Long Range SOF Missions (USAF/CV-22)
    2,100 nm Self Deploy (with one refueling)
    50 nm External Lift Operations with 10,000 lb load



    SD-572 Mission Threshold MV-22 Block A
    Self - Deployment (3 x 430 gal)2,100 NM 2,384 NM
    Pre - Assault Raid200 NM268.6 NM
    Amphib Assault - Troops50 NM 82.2 NM
    Amphib Assault - External Cargo50 NM 130.1 NM
    Land Assault - Troops 200 NM 245.9 NM
    Land Assault - Ext Cargo50 NM 63.3 NM
    Airspeed 240 kts Cruise speed (MV-22)
    230 kts Cruise speed (CV-22)
    275 KTAS Cruise speed (3000'/91.5 deg F)
    305 KTAS Max speed (15,000' /45 deg F)

    Rate of Climb 1,090 fpm (332 m/m) Vertical rate of climb, SL
    2,320 fpm (707 m/m) Max rate of climb, SL
    Ceiling 25,000 ft (7,925 m) Service Ceiling
    11,300 ft (3,444 m) Service Ceiling, OEI
    14,200 ft (4,328 m) HOGE
    Cabin provisions24 troops/12 litters
    Rescue hoist capacity600 lbs
    Cargo floor limit300 PSF
    MilestonesFirst Flight - March 19, 1989
    First Sea Trials - USS Wasp (LHD-1), December, 1990, Aircraft # 3 & 4
    First EMD Flight - February 5, 1997
    2nd Sea Trials - USS Saipan (LHA-2), January, 1999, Aircraft #10
    First LRIP Delivery - May 25, 1999
    OPEVAL - Scheduled October, 1999 to May, 2000
    Full Rate Production - First Quarter, 2001
    IOC - USMC - 2001;
    IOC - US SOCOM - 2004
    Unit Cost $40.1M (Total Program Recurring Flyaway, Constant Year, FY94$)
    Number Procured 12 MV-22(authorized through FY98)
    Planned Inventory 360 MV-22B (USMC)
    50 CV-22A (USAF)
    48 HV-22B (USN)
    Deployed to MV-22s will be deployed to all Marine Corps medium lift active duty and reserve tactical squadrons, the medium lift training squadron (FRS), and the executive support squadron (HMX)



    NEWSLETTER
    Join the GlobalSecurity.org mailing list