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Military

Appendix C

Traffic Point Control

Effective control of traffic requires that basic rules be followed so traffic will proceed in an orderly manner. These basic rules are based on command requirements and common sense.

The primary goals sought in point control of traffic are to insure the orderly movement of traffic in accordance with the traffic control plan, prevent unnecessary delay and meet all command safety requirements.

Prior to instructing a road user to move or turn, look at the traffic to insure the driver can respond to the signal without confusion or danger.

When using hand signals, Military Police must apply the following basic rules:

  • Assume a correct stance for controlling traffic, thus reducing fatigue and presenting a good appearance.
  • Execute distinct and complete Signals. Each signal made by the Military Police must be understood by the road user.
  • If it appears the driver does not understand, repeat the signal.
  • The key rule in point control of traffic is to LOOK carefully at the developing traffic situation; EXECUTE the appropriate signal properly and precisely; and then COMPLETE each signal distinctly.

    Basic Stance for Traffic Control

    Stand with your feet approximately shoulder width apart so your weight is evenly distributed on both feet. Hands and arms should hang naturally at your sides. Head and body are erect but not stiff. Keep your feet planted in position, but do not lock your knees or tense your body.

    Direct Traffic From the Right To Proceed Straight Ahead

    Look to the right.

    Extend your right arm up and out to the right side so it is parallel to the ground. Your right palm is facing up and your hand is straight, fingers extended and joined (Figure 2).

    Without moving your upper arm, use your elbow as a fixed axis and rotate your right forearm across the front of your body so your hand stops just below your chin with the palm facing down (Figure 3).

    Complete the signal by dropping your arm smartly and returning to the basic stance.

    Direct Traffic From Left To Proceed Straight Ahead

    Look to the left.

    Extend your left arm up and out to the left side until parallel to the ground. Your left palm faces up and the hand is straight, fingers extended and joined (Figure 4).

    Without moving your upper arm, use your elbow as a fixed axis and rotate your left forearm across the front of your body so your hand stops just below your chin with the palm facing down (Figure 5).

    Complete by dropping your arm smartly and returning to the basic stance.

    Stop Traffic From the Right

    Look to the right.

    Thrust your right arm to the right and up, bending the elbow slightly. Fingers are extended and joined; palm is flat and facing out to the right with the entire surface clearly visible to oncoming traffic. Your elbow should be bent and at eye level so the hand is well above your headgear.

    When putting up a stop sign, allow the driver time to react and bring his vehicle to a stop.

    Stop Traffic From the Left

    Look to the left.

    Thrust your left arm to the left and up, bending the elbow slightly. Fingers are extended and joined; palm is flat and facing out to the left with the entire surface clearly visible to oncoming traffic.

    Stop Traffic From the Front

    Look to the front.

    Raise your left arm up and out to the front, keeping the fingers joined and extended with palm facing outward so your entire hand is clearly visible to oncoming traffic. Your elbow should be bent and at eye level so the hand is well above your headgear.

    When the traffic is halted, complete the signal by dropping your arm to your side.

    Note: You raise your left arm because traffic from your front approaches on your left side.

    Stop Traffic From the Rear

    Bend your left knee slightly and twist your body to the right, turning your head and eyes to the right rear; do not move your feet.

    Raise your right arm up and out to the rear with your fingers extended and joined and palm facing traffic to the rear, keeping your elbow bent and at eye level.

    When the traffic is halted, complete the signal by dropping your arm and returning to the basic stance.

    Stop signals to the front and rear are completed by simply dropping your arm and returning to the basic stance.

    Direct Traffic From the Left to Turn Right

    Look to the left.

    Extend your left arm straight out to the left so it is parallel to the ground. Point the first two fingers of your left hand at the vehicle to turn. Palms facing forward.

    Without turning your shoulders or body, sweep your left arm 8 to 10 inches to the rear (to the driver's right and to your left).

    Complete by dropping your arm and returning to the basic stance.

    Direct Traffic From the Right to Turn Right

    Look to the right.

    Extend your right arm straight out to the right so it is parallel to the ground. Point the first two fingers of your right hand at the vehicle to turn. Palm facing forward.

    Move your arm in a sweeping motion 90 degrees to the front, keeping your arm parallel to the ground.

    Complete by dropping your arm smartly to your side, returning to the basic stance.

    Note: Right turns normally are referred to as blending turns.

    Direct Traffic From the Right To Turn Left

    Look to the right and determine the driver's intent to turn.

    Look to the left and halt traffic by putting up a stop signal. Make sure your left hand is well above your headgear (Figure 15).

    Holding the stop signal in position on the left, look back to the right and extend your right arm out to the right side, parallel to the ground, pointing the first two fingers of your right hand at the vehicle to turn (Figure 16).

    Note: Left turns are normally referred to as conflicting turns.

    Without turning your shoulders or body, sweep your right arm 8 to 10 inches to the rear to indicate the turn (Figure 17).

    Complete the turn signal by dropping your right arm to your side.

    Watch the vehicle making the turn until it has cleared the intersection, then look back to the left.

    Convert the stop signal to a come-through signal by rotating your palm inward, rotating the forearm across the front of your body until your hand is just below your chin, and dropping your arm smartly to the side (Figure 18).

    Direct Traffic From the Left To Turn Left

    Look to the left to determine the driver's intent to turn.

    Look to the right and halt traffic by putting up a stop signal (Figure 19).

    Holding the stop signal in place on the right, look back to the left and extend your left arm straight out to the side, pointing your first two fingers at the vehicle to turn (Figure 20).

    Move your left arm in a sweeping motion 90 degrees to the front, keeping your arm parallel to the ground (Figure 21).

    Complete the turn signal by dropping your left arm to your side.

    Watch the turning vehicle until it has cleared the intersection, then look back to the right.

    Convert the stop signal to a come-through signal by rotating your right palm inward, rotating your right forearm across the front of your body until your hand is just below your chin, and dropping the arm to your side (Figure 22).

    Change the Flow of Traffic

    Look to the right, put up a stop signal with your right arm, and hold that signal in position (Figure 23).

    Look to the left, put up a stop signal with your right arm, and hold it in position (Figure 24).

    Turn your body 90 degrees to the right or left so you face the traffic just stopped.

    Look to the left and convert your left arm stop signal to a come-through signal by rotating your palm 180 degrees so it faces inward. With your elbow fixed, rotate your forearm across in front of your body until the hand is just under your chin, palm facing down (Figure 25). Complete signal by dropping your arm.

    Look to the right and convert your right arm stop signal to a come-through signal by rotating the hand 180 degrees so your palm faces inward. With your elbow fixed, rotate your forearm across in front of your body until the hand is just under your chin, palm facing down (Figure 26).

    Complete the signal by dropping your arm and returning to the basic stance.

    Basic Stance For Directing Traffic With Baton Flashlights

    The basic stance for traffic control remains the same except the MP holds a baton flashlight in each hand, keeping the thumb on the switch at all times (Figure 27).

    Stop Traffic From the Right

    Look to the right.

    Bend your right elbow and bring the baton to a vertical position directly in front of your face.

    Switch the light on and slowly move the baton back and forth in a 45 degree arc (Figure 28 & 29).

    When traffic halts, stop the movement and switch the light off.

    Stop Traffic From the Left

    Look to the left.

    Bend your left elbow and bring the baton to a vertical position in front of your face.

    Switch the light on and slowly move the baton back and forth in a 45 degree arc (Figure 30 & 31).

    When traffic halts, stop the movement and switch the light off.

    Stop Traffic From the Front

    Look to the front.

    Bend your left elbow and bring the baton into a vertical position directly in front of your face (Figure 32).

    Switch the light on and move the baton slowly back and forth in front of your face in a 45 degree arc.

    When the traffic halts, stop the motion of the light and switch it off.

    Stop Traffic From the Rear

    Bend your left knee and twist your body to the right, turning your head and eyes to the rear. Do not move your feet (Figure 33).

    Bend your right elbow and bring the baton into a vertical position directly in front of your face.

    Switch the light on and move the baton slowly in front of your face in a 45 degree arc.

    When traffic halts, stop the movement of the light, switch the light off, and return to the basic stance.

    Direct Traffic From the Right To Proceed

    Look to the right

    Extend your right arm out to the side, parallel to the ground, with the cone of the baton pointed to the front (Figure 34).

    Switch the light on and slowly lower your right arm to your side, keeping the baton pointed to the front (Figure 35).

    Switch the light off to complete.

    Direct Traffic From the Left to Proceed

    Look to the left.

    Extend your left arm out to the side, parallel to the ground, with the palm up and the cone of the baton pointed to the rear (Figure 36).

    Switch the light on and slowly lower your left arm to your side, keeping the baton pointed to the rear (Figure 37).

    Switch the light off to complete.

    Direct Traffic From the Right To Turn Right

    Look to the right.

    Extend your right arm out to the right side, parallel to the ground, with the cone of the baton pointed to the front. Switch the light on (Figure 38).

    Sweep your right arm 90 degrees to the front, simultaneously turning your wrist to the right so that the cone remains pointed to the front (Figure 39).

    When the baton points directly to the front, stop the movement, switch the light off, and drop your arm.

    Note: Right turns are normally referred to as blending turns.

    Direct Traffic From the Left To Turn Right

    Look to the left.

    Extend your left arm out to the side, parallel to the ground, with the palm up and the baton pointed to the rear (Figure 40).

    Switch the light on and sweep your arm to the rear 8 to 10 inches (Figure 41).

    Switch the light off and drop your arm.

    Direct Traffic From the Right To Turn Left

    Look to the right.

    Look to the left and signal traffic to stop. When the traffic stops, switch the light off and keep the baton in the vertical position (Figure 42).

    Look to the right and extend your right arm out and to the side, parallel to the ground, with the palm up and the cone pointed to the rear (your right and the driver's left). Switch the light on (Figure 43).

    Sweep your right arm 8 to 10 inches to the rear and switch the light off (Figure 44).

    Drop your right arm and watch the turning vehicle until it has cleared the intersection.

    Look to the left and extend your left arm out to the side, parallel to the ground, with the cone pointed to the rear. Switch the light on and signal the traffic to proceed (Figure 45).

    Note: Left turns are normally referred to as conflicting turns.

    Direct Traffic From the Left To Turn Left

    Look to the left.

    Look to the right and signal traffic to stop. When the traffic stops, switch the light off and keep the baton in the vertical position (Figure 46).

    Look to the left and extend your left arm out to the side, parallel to the ground, with the cone pointed to the front. Switch the light on (Figure 47).

    Sweep your left arm to the front, simultaneously turning your wrist to the left. When the cone points directly to the front, switch the light off and drop your left arm (Figure 48).

    Watch the turning vehicle until it has cleared the intersection.

    Look to the right and extend your right arm out to the side with the baton pointed to the front. Switch the light on and signal the traffic to proceed (Figure 49).

    Change the Flow of Traffic

    Look to the right and signal the traffic to stop. Switch the light off and hold the baton in the vertical position (Figure 50).

    Look to the left and signal the traffic to stop. Switch the light off and hold the baton in the vertical position (Figure 51).

    Turn your body to the right or left 90 degrees so that you face the traffic just stopped.

    Look to the right and extend your right arm out to the side with the baton pointed to the front. Switch the light on and signal the traffic to proceed (Figure 52).

    Look to the left and extend your left arm out to the side with the baton pointed to the rear. Switch the light on and signal the traffic to proceed (Figure 53).



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