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Bushehr - Reactor Unit I Construction Site

The Reactor Unit I was being built by the Russians for $800-million, and as of early September 2001 was scheduled to be fully complete by early 2004.

The dome of the reactor building consisted of a cylindrical shell and hemispherical shell placed on top, each measuring a 60 meter diameter. The steel containment shell was spherical and measures 56 meters in diameter.

Much of the scaffolding that was present in previous imagery was had been removed as construction to the exterior of the dome was completed.

Much of the exterior remained unchanged from the original German designs including a gantry that was mounted to the outside of the dome and was designed to allow easy access for materials and parts to the reactor dome.

The tall building to the left of the dome was the generator building, which according to German design would contain horizontally and vertically arranged sections with a 1500 rpm saturated-steam condensing turbine-generator unit used for the generation of electricity, and one double-flow high presssure casing and three double-flow low pressure casings. Additionally, the external walls of the building are solid to increase acoustic insulation.

The building to the right of the dome contained workshops, stores, a water treatment plant, laboratory, welfare rooms, as well as the diesel emergency generators for Unit I.

Inside, the reactor building is divided into two containment areas, one formed by the steel containment and the other an outer containment shield. Both were high-pressure parts of the nuclear steam supply system and the spent fuel storage pool and the new fuel store. The German design called for the steel containment shell to be 56 meters in diameter and designed for a pressure of 5.7 bar, it was capable of absorbing the full equilibrium pressure in the case of a design basis accident. The outer shell acted as a barrier against direct radiation from the reactor building and as a protective shield for the reactor plant from ecternal impacts.


Credit: spaceimaging.com. Copyright (c) Space Imaging. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Online and news media distribution or publishing requires permission from Space Imaging.




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