Find a Security Clearance Job!

Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD)

 

11 November 2004

U.S. Reiterates Firm Commitment to One China Policy

Welcomes "constructive points" in Chen Sui-bian's speech

In response to questions at its November 10 press briefing, the State Department issued a statement welcoming the "positive and constructive" points in Chen Shui-bian's cross-Strait policy speech.

"We believe it lays a foundation for progress and offers some creative ideas for reducing tensions and resuming the cross-Strait dialogue," the State Department said.

"The United States is firmly committed to our one China policy, the three joint communiques, and our responsibilities under the Taiwan Relations Act," according to the State Department.

In a separate statement, the State Department repeated that there is no change in U.S. policy, including the Six Assurances regarding Taiwan.

Following is the text of a Taken Question from the State Department's November 10 Press Briefing:

(begin text)

Taken Questions
Office of the Press Spokesman
Washington, DC
November 10, 2004
Question Taken at November 10, 2004 Daily Press Briefing

Taiwan -- Chen's 10-Point Cross Strait Policy Speech

QUESTION: What's the U.S. reaction to President Chen's cross-Strait policy speech?

Answer: We welcome the positive and constructive points in Chen Shui-bian's speech.

We believe it lays a foundation for progress and offers some creative ideas for reducing tensions and resuming the cross-Strait dialogue. We urge both sides to take this opportunity to engage in dialogue in order to resolve their differences peacefully.

Our policy remains the same. The United States is firmly committed to our one China policy, the three joint communiques, and our responsibilities under the Taiwan Relations Act. We oppose any efforts by either side to unilaterally alter the status quo.

We do not support Taiwan independence.

We have long maintained that differences between the People's Republic of China and Taiwan are matters to be resolved peacefully by the people on both sides of the Taiwan Strait, absent the threat or use of force, and should be acceptable to the people on both sides of the Taiwan Strait.

(end text)

(Distributed by the Bureau of International Information Programs, U.S. Department of State. Web site: http://usinfo.state.gov)



This page printed from: http://usinfo.state.gov/xarchives/display.html?p=washfile-english&y=2004&m=November&x=20041111123612attocnich0.5527613&t=livefeeds/wf-latest.html



NEWSLETTER
Join the GlobalSecurity.org mailing list