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Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD)

Albright Sees Complicated Pyongyang-Seoul Relationship


U.S. DEPARTMENT OF STATE
Office of the Spokesman
October 26, 2000

Press Briefing by Madeleine K. Albright, Secretary of State
On Plane En Route Washington, D.C. from Seoul, Republic of Korea

Kim Jong Il said I hope you'll figure out a way to send us some
English teachers and if they're Korean-American, that's fine. And I
think that's a very important step in terms of understanding that he
needs English and that he's willing to have some Korean-Americans come
to do that.

But what is interesting here is that, from my own perspective, I'd say
that the differences between East and West Berlin were much less than
between Pyongyang and Seoul and they've got a long - this is a very
complicated story. The Germans as they unified, you know the Germans
had never fought each other.

As we changed our relationship with the Soviet Union, the truth is
we'd never gone to war with the Soviet Union - a hot war. People did
not die as a result of physical fighting between us and the Soviet
Union. And the Germans hadn't fought each other. So this is a very
different issue and I think it's going to be a very interesting
unfolding story.

You never know in any country whether you're actually going to see who
they say you're going to see. So not only did I see him but I saw him
at great length; much longer than I think either of us expected.

Q: Did you feel like Nixon in China?

SECRETARY ALBRIGHT: No, I never feel like Nixon, anywhere.

Kim Dae Jung is a remarkable human being who had a vision and who has
pursued it in a systematic way and has allowed the rest of us to build
on what he has done. I said to Kim Dae Jung - very rarely do you
actually have a chance to say something like this that's usually in
some speech - but to say to somebody that I stood on the shoulders of
a giant in order to be able to have the discussion with Kim Jong Il.
It's his doing and he should have the credit and we can build on what
he's done. The Trilateral aspect of this is very important and all of
us have to do things in parallel.

Did I touch every subject? I probably touched on it. Did I clarify
every subject? No. This was the first meeting that has ever taken
place. I think we did a lot of business. A lot more than I thought we
would do. I never expected to sign anything out of here. I never
expected to walk out with any specific thing. And I actually got more
than I thought which is the fact that we spoke longer about more
subjects in more depth and these Einhorn talks are - positive factor.



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