Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD)

DATE=8/15/2000
TYPE=CORRESPONDENT REPORT
TITLE=KOREAS REUNION (L)
NUMBER=2-265466
BYLINE=AMY BICKERS
DATELINE=SEOUL
CONTENT=
VOICED AT:
INTRO: A plane carrying 100 North Koreans arrived in 
Seoul Tuesday for a four-day reunion of long-lost 
relatives separated by the Korean War.  As V-O-A's Amy 
Bickers reports from Seoul, 100 South Koreans are also 
being reunited with relatives in North Korea.
TEXT: Hundreds of separated parents and children, 
husbands and wives and brothers and sisters are 
embracing for the first time in half a century.
The North Korean government chose 100 citizens to go 
to Seoul to meet with their kin, while 100 South 
Koreans were picked by computer lottery to go North. 
They are only a tiny fraction of the millions of 
people who were separated by the Korean War, in the 
early 1950's. Because there is no civilian mail or 
telephone service between the two nations, reunion 
participants have little idea of how their loved ones 
have fared over the years.
The reunion is the result of the accord reached by 
South Korean President Kim Dae-jung and North Korea's 
Kim Jong Il during their June summit. The North Korean 
leader said Saturday there will be more reunions in 
September and October. 
The Seoul government has briefed South Koreans 
traveling north, telling them to avoid discussing 
politics when in Pyongyang. South Koreans meeting 
their Northern relatives in Seoul have been warned not 
to stare at badges typically worn by North Koreans, 
depicting leader Kim Jong Il and comparing the two 
countries' political systems. (SIGNED)
NEB/HK/AB/GC/WD 
14-Aug-2000 23:33 PM LOC (15-Aug-2000 0333 UTC)
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Source: Voice of America
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