Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD)

USIS Washington File

19 June 2000

Text: State Department Fact Sheet on Sanctions Against North Korea

(U.S. to ease sanctions beginning June 19, 2000) (420)
The United States will begin easing sanctions against North Korea
beginning June 19, 2000, the State Department announced.
In a statement released June 19, State's Office of the Spokesman said
the decision to ease sanctions was taken in view of North Korea's
assurances that it will continue its moratorium on the testing of
long-range ballistic missiles.
Easing sanctions easing will allow a wide range of exports and imports
of American and North Korean commercial and consumer goods, the
statement said. Direct personal and commercial financial transactions
will be allowed, and restrictions on investment will also be eased.
Commercial U.S. ships and aircraft carrying U.S. goods will be allowed
to call at ports in the Democratic Peoples' Republic of Korea (DPRK).
Following is the text:
(begin text)
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF STATE
Office of the Spokesman June 19, 2000
FACT SHEET
IMPLEMENTATION OF EASING OF SANCTIONS AGAINST NORTH KOREA
On September 17, 1999, in accordance with improvements in the US-DPRK
relationship, the President announced that the United States would
ease substantially sanctions in categories that fall under the Trading
with the Enemy Act, the Export Administration Regulations, and the
Defense Production Act.
In view of North Korea's assurances that it will continue its
moratorium on the testing of long-range ballistic missiles, the United
States is implementing the sanctions easing on June 19, 2000.
The sanctions easing will allow a wide range of exports and imports of
US and DPRK commercial and consumer goods. Imports from North Korea
will be allowed, subject to an approval process. Direct personal and
commercial financial transactions will be allowed between U.S. and
DPRK persons. Restrictions on investment will also be eased.
Commercial U.S. ships and aircraft carrying U.S. goods will be allowed
to call at DPRK ports.
Regulations effecting the sanctions easing have been issued by the
Departments of Treasury, Commerce and Transportation and are published
in the June 19, 2000 Federal Register.
This easing of sanctions does not affect our counter-terrorism or
nonproliferation controls on North Korea, which prohibit exports of
military and sensitive dual-use items and most types of U.S.
assistance. Statutory restrictions, such as U.S. missile sanctions,
will remain in place. Restrictions on North Korea based on
multilateral arrangements also will remain in place.
(end text)
(Distributed by the Office of International Information Programs, U.S.
Department of State. Web site: http://usinfo.state.gov)



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