Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD)

CHINA IS POTENTIAL MILITARY COMPETITOR OF U.S.: REPORT

Central News Agency

2006-02-04 13:21:42

    Washington, Feb. 3 (CNA) China is a potential military competitor likely to counterbalance traditional military advantages enjoyed by the United States, according to the Quadrennial Defense Review Report released Friday by the U.S. Department of Defense. "Of the major and emerging powers, China has the greatest potential to compete militarily with the United States and field disruptive military technologies that could over time offset traditional U.S. military advantages," the report said.

    China has sped up its military modernization since the mid-to-late 1990s in response to central leadership demands to develop military options against scenarios concerning Taiwan, according to the report.

    China continues to invest heavily in its military to improve its ability to project power beyond its borders, with the country's defense spending increasing by more than 10 percent every year since 1996 except 2003, the report said. "The pace and scope of China's military build-up already puts regional military balances at risk," it said.

    According to the report, China is likely to continue making large investments in high-end, asymmetric military capabilities, emphasizing electronic and cyber-warfare; counter-space operations; ballistic and cruise missiles; advanced integrated air defense systems; next generation torpedoes; advanced submarines; strategic nuclear strike from modern, sophisticated land- and sea-based systems; and theater unmanned aerial vehicles for employment by the Chinese military and for global export.

    It said the United States will seek to encourage China to choose a path of peaceful economic growth and political liberalization, rather than military threat and intimidation.

    The United States will also seek to ensure that no foreign power can dictate the terms of regional or global security and will attempt to dissuade any military competitor from developing disruptive or other capabilities that could enable regional hegemony or hostile action against the United States or other friendly countries, it added.

(By Oliver Lin and Y.F. Low)

ENDITEM/Li



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