Military


F-22 Raptor Chronology

1980's

November 1981
Air Force identifies need for advanced tactical fighter to replace the F-15.

May 1983
Pratt & Whitney initiates design of the PW5000, which is later designated F119.

September 1983
The Air Force awards concept definition contracts to seven aircraft manufacturers capable of producing the Advanced Tactical Fighter, or ATF. At the same time, engine demonstration/validation (dem/val) contracts are awarded to Pratt & Whitney and General Electric.

September 1985
The formal ATF request for proposal (RFP) is issued. Also, Pratt & Whitney fabricates the first YF119 engine parts.

November 1985
The Air Force issues more stringent stealth goals for the ATF designs.

May 1986

Secretary of the Air Force Edward Aldridge announces that as part of the Packard Commission guidelines, the ATF dem/val program will now include prototype aircraft, engines, and a prototype avionics demonstration.

June 1986
The Air Force awards contracts to Pratt & Whitney and General Electric for the ATF prototype engines, which will be designated YF119-PW-100 and YF120-GE-100, respectively.

August 1986
Lockheed, Boeing, and General Dynamics sign a memorandum of understanding (MOU)leading to a teaming agreement.

September 1986

Assembly begins on the first YF119-PW-100 engine. It would begin testing the following month.

October 1986
Lockheed is one of two contractors -- the other being Northrop (builder of the YF-23) -- selected to compete in the demonstration/validation phase of the advanced tactical fighter program. Lockheed is to build two YF-22A prototypes.

October 13, 1986
Teaming Agreement signed as Lockheed, Boeing and General Dynamics agree to compete as a team.

July 10, 1987
The original design of the YF-22 is found to be technically and competitively unacceptable by the team. Only three months later, a new design is selected.

July 13, 1987
The contractor team initiates new YF-22 configuration design and development.

July 17, 1987
Initial tests of the YF-22's avionics system are carried out on the team's Airborne Flying Laboratory (AFL), a company-owned Boeing 757.

October 1987
The new configuration of the YF-22 is selected.



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