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APPROVED

NAVY TRAINING SYSTEM PLAN

FOR THE

AIM-54 PHOENIX MISSILE

N88-NTSP-A-50-8007C/A

APRIL 1999

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

The AIM-54 Phoenix Missile was developed in the 1970s as the principle long-range, air-to-air, defense armament of the F-14 Aircraft. The AIM-54 Phoenix Missile is a fielded weapon currently in Phase III, the Production, Fielding/Deployment, and Operational Support Phase of the Weapon System Acquisition Process. The AIM-54 Phoenix Missile is used exclusively on the F-14A/B/D Aircraft.

The AIM-54 Phoenix Missile is a radar guided, air-to-air missile consisting of a guidance section, armament section, propulsion section, control section, interconnecting surface cables, wings, and fins. The three versions of the AIM-54 Phoenix Missile currently being used are the AIM-54A, AIM-54C, and the AIM-54 Electronic Counter Counter-Measure (ECCM)/Sealed. Initial Operating Capability was attained in 1974 for the AIM-54A, 1986 for the AIM-54C, and 1988 for the AIM-54C ECCM/Sealed.

The AIM-54 Phoenix Missile maintenance concept is based on an overall objective to assure All-Up-Rounds are available to fulfill commitments of operational activities and provide the means to restore unserviceable missiles to serviceable condition with minimal downtime. Maintenance requirements are allocated to the organizational, intermediate, and depot levels of maintenance as defined in the Naval Airborne Weapons Maintenance Program, OPNAVINST 8600.2B. Workload associated with AIM-54 Phoenix Missile does not increase existing manning levels.

The AIM-54 Phoenix Missile training concept is divided into organizational and intermediate level. Organizational level training is provided to the operator and maintenance personnel. Operator training is provided to F-14 pilot and Naval Flight Officer personnel by VF-101, Naval Air Station (NAS) Oceana. Strike Weapons and Tactics School, Atlantic (SWATSLANT) NAS Oceana provides F-14 aircrew instruction on Phoenix employment and tactics prior to Carrier Air Wing deployment, and Naval Strike and Air Warfare Center (NSAWC) TOPGUN at NAS Fallon provides select F-14 aircrew instruction on Phoenix employment and tactics. Organizational level maintenance training is provided to Aviation Ordnanceman (AO) by Maintenance Training Unit (MTU) 1007, NAS Oceana and SWATSLANT, NAS Oceana. Intermediate level maintenance training is provided to AO personnel by MTU 4030, Naval Station Mayport; MTU 4032, NAS Norfolk; MTU 4033, NAS North Island; and MTU 4035, NAS Whidbey Island.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Page

Executive Summary i

List of Acronyms iii

Preface vi

PART I - TECHNICAL PROGRAM DATA

    1. Title-Nomenclature-Program I-1
    2. Security Classification I-1
    3. Manpower, Personnel, and Training Principals I-1
    4. System Description I-2
    5. Developmental Test and Operational Test I-2
    6. Aircraft and/or Equipment/System/Subsystem Replaced I-2
    7. Description of New Development I-2
    8. Concepts I-5
    1. On-Board (In-Service) Training I-15
    1. Logistics Support I-16
    2. Schedules I-18
    3. Government Furnished Equipment and Contractor Furnished Equipment Training Requirements I-19
    4. Related NTSPs and Other Applicable Documents I-19

PART II - BILLET AND PERSONNEL REQUIREMENTS II-1

PART III - TRAINING REQUIREMENTS III-1

PART IV - TRAINING LOGISTICS SUPPORT REQUIREMENTS IV-1

PART V - MPT MILESTONES V-1

PART VI - DECISION ITEMS/ACTION REQUIRED VI-1

PART VII - POINTS OF CONTACT VII-1

LIST OF ACRONYMS

AEM

Air Evaluation Missile

AIMD

Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance Department

AMIST

Aviation Maintenance In-Service Training

AMTCS

Aviation Maintenance Training Continuum System

AO

Aviation Ordnanceman

ATM

Air Training Missile

AUR

All-Up-Round

 

 

BIST

Built-In Self Test

 

 

CAI

Computer Aided Instruction

CAIMS

Conventional Ammunition Integrated Management System

CANTRAC

Catalog of Navy Training Courses

CATM

Captive Air Training Missile

CBT

Computer Based Training

CEST

Classroom EOD Systems Trainer

CIN

Course Information Number

CINCLANTFLT

Commander in Chief, Atlantic Fleet

CINCPACFLT

Commander in Chief, Pacific Fleet

CMI

Computer Managed Instruction

CNARF

Commander, Naval Air Reserve Force

CNET

Commander, Naval Education and Training

CNO

Chief of Naval Operations

CWTPI

Conventional Weapon Technical Proficiency Inspection

 

 

DA

Developing Agency

DATM

Dummy Air Training Missile

DEU

Digital Electronics Unit

DOP

Designated Overhaul Point

 

 

EA

Electronic Assembly

EAG

Extended Active Gate

ECCM

Electronic Counter Counter-Measure

ECP

Engineering Change Proposal

ECU

Electrical Conversion Unit

EOD

Explosive Ordnance Disposal

EODTEU

Explosive Ordnance Disposal Training Evaluation Unit

ESCA

Electronic Servo Control Amplifier

 

 

FOT&E

Follow-On Test and Evaluation

FRS

Fleet Replacement Squadron

 

 

GMTS

Guided Missile Test Set

 

 

HAP

High Altitude Performance

 

 

ICW

Interactive Courseware

ILSP

Integrated Logistics Support Plan

ISA

Inertial Sensor Assembly

IUT

Instructor Under Training

 

 

M&P

Manpower and Personnel

MOAT

Missile On Aircraft Test

MSD

Material Support Date

MTIP

Maintenance Training Improvement Program

MTU

Maintenance Training Unit

 

 

NA

Not Applicable

NALC

Navy Ammunition Logistics Code

NAMTRAGRU DET

Naval Air Maintenance Training Group Detachment

NAS

Naval Air Station

NAVAIRSYSCOM

Naval Air Systems Command

NAVEDTRA

Naval Education and Training

NAVPERSCOM

Naval Personnel Command

NAVSCOLEOD

Navy School, Explosive Ordnance Disposal

NEC

Navy Enlisted Classification

NFO

Naval Flight Officer

NS

Naval Station

NSAWC

Naval Strike and Air Warfare Center

NSD

Navy Support Date

NSWC

Naval Surface Warfare Center

NTSP

Navy Training System Plan

NWS

Naval Weapons Station

 

 

OATMS

OPNAV Aviation Training Management System

OPEVAL

Operational Evaluation

OPNAV

Office of the Chief of Naval Operations

OPNAVINST

Office of the Chief of Naval Operations Instructions

OPO

OPNAV Principle Official

 

 

PEST

Practical EOD Systems Trainer

 

 

RFT

Ready For Training

RID

Reject Image Device

RSP

Render Safe Procedure

 

 

SELRES

Selected Reserve

SFTI

Strike Fighter Tactics Instructor

SFTP

Strike Fighter Training Program

SFTS

Strike Fighter Training System

SFWSL

Strike Fighter Weapons School, Atlantic

SFWSP

Strike Fighter Weapons School, Pacific

SFWT

Strike Fighter Weapons and Tactics

SIST

Serviceable In-Service Time

SRA

Shop Replaceable Assembly

SSRTU

Solid-State Receiver-Transmitter Unit

SWATSLANT

Strike Weapons And Tactics School, Atlantic

 

 

TA

Training Agent

TD

Training Device

TDD

Target Detecting Device

TECHEVAL

Technical Evaluation

TMCR

Technical Manual Control Requirements

TSA

Training Support Agent

TTE

Technical Training Equipment

 

 

WR

Work Requests

WST

Weapons System Trainer

WTT

Weapons Tactics Trainer

PREFACE

This Navy Training System Plan (NTSP) for the AIM-54 Phoenix Missile was prepared by the Naval Air Systems Command as part of the regular NTSP update process within the guidelines as set forth in OPNAVINST 1500.76. This NTSP reflects the changes that have occurred since the previously approved Navy Training Plan, A-50-8007B for the AIM-54C Phoenix Missile dated September 1992.

The major changes and updates to this NTSP consist of:

PART I This part shows the deletion of outdated information; incorporation of changes to formal training; updated Training Device (TD) allocation listings; identification of "A" School Core and Strand training and "C" School Initial and Career training; and deletion and relocation of training sites due to decisions made by the Base Realignment Commission.

PART II This part has been recalculated to depict current billet requirements of fleet support units through FY03.

PART III In addition to reflecting the changes mentioned above, this part has been recalculated to depict chargeable student billets through FY03.

PART IV This part has been updated to reflect changes in training and training logistics support requirements.

PART V No major changes.

PART VI No major changes.

PART VII This part has been updated to reflect current Points of Contact.

NTSP Number: N88-NTSP-A-50-8007C/A

Date: April 1999

PART I - TECHNICAL PROGRAM DATA

A. TITLE-NOMENCLATURE-PROGRAM

1. Title-Nomenclature-Acronym. Phoenix Missile, AIM-54

2. Program Element. 663321N.

B. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION

1. System Characteristics Secret

2. Capabilities Secret

3. Functions Unclassified

C. MANPOWER, PERSONNEL, AND TRAINING PRINCIPALS

OPNAV Principal Official (OPO) Program Sponsor CNO (N88)

OPO Resource Sponsor CNO (N880C7)

Developing Agency (DA) NAVAIRSYSCOM (PMA259)

Training Agency (TA) CINCLANTFLT

CINCPACFLT

CNET(N-232/N-53)

COMNAVAIRESFOR

NSAWC (N7)

Training Support Agency (TSA) NAVAIRSYSCOM (PMA205)

Manpower and Personnel (M&P) Mission Sponsor CNO (N1)

NAVPERSCOM (NPC-4, -22)

Commander, Reserve Program Manager COMNAVAIRESFOR

(Code N85)

Director of Naval Training CNO (N7)

 

D. SYSTEM DESCRIPTION

1. Operational Uses. The AIM-54 Phoenix Missile; hereafter referred to as the AIM-54A, AIM-54C, or AIM-54C Electronic Counter Counter-Measure (ECCM)/Sealed Missile when describing each specific configuration, or the Phoenix Missile when referring to all configurations, was developed as the principal long-range, air-to-air, defense armament of the F-14A/B/D aircraft. The combination of the Phoenix Missile and F-14 aircraft are a total weapon system that has the capability to launch up to six missiles against an equal number of targets at ranges sufficient to provide a first line of defense.

2. Foreign Military Sales. Currently, there are no Foreign Military Sales of the Phoenix Missile.

E. DEVELOPMENTAL TEST AND OPERATIONAL TEST. The AIM-54A Technical Evaluation (TECHEVAL) was completed in November 1973. Operational Evaluation (OPEVAL) was completed in November 1974. The AIM-54C TECHEVAL began in May 1982 and was completed in November 1982. The OPEVAL began in March 1983 and was completed in August 1983. AIM-54C ECCM/Sealed Missile TECHEVAL was completed in June 1985, and OPEVAL was completed in July 1988.

F. AIRCRAFT AND/OR EQUIPMENT/SYSTEM/SUBSYSTEM REPLACED. The AIM-54C ECCM/Sealed are replacing the AIM-54A and AIM-54C. As AIM-54A and AIM-54C inventories are depleted, they will not be replenished.

G. DESCRIPTION OF NEW DEVELOPMENT

1. Functional Description. The Phoenix Missile is a radar guided, air-to-air missile consisting of a guidance section, armament section, propulsion section, control section, interconnecting surface cables, wings, and fins. The missile is designed for ejection launch using the LAU-93 or LAU-132 launchers. Semi-active and active homing radar and hydraulically operated fins direct and stabilize the missile on course to the target. Propulsion is provided by a solid propellant rocket motor, and lethality by a high explosive warhead. Performance modifications to the AIM-54A were incorporated during and after production. The Reject Image Device (RID), High Altitude Performance (HAP), and Extended Active Gate (EAG) were incorporated during production. The MK 11 MOD 3 Electronics Assembly (EA) modification was installed by retrofit after production. The AIM-54C and AIM-54C ECCM/Sealed Missile have a Built-In Self Test (BIST) feature. BIST may be selected in conjunction with Missile On Aircraft Test (MOAT). The AIM-54C ECCM/Sealed Missile provides two major improvements over the AIM-54C. They are: (1) ECCM provides enhanced electronic protection, and (2) sealing the missile eliminates the requirement for aircraft supplied liquid thermal conditioning fluid during captive flight. Major modifications to each section of the different versions of the Phoenix Missile are described below.

a. Guidance Section

(1) AIM-54A. The RID modification offers improved capabilities against low altitude targets over water. The EAG modification improves capabilities against certain Electronic Counter Measure (ECM) threats.

(2) AIM-54C. The AIM-54C Guidance Section incorporates a new Solid-State Receiver-Transmitter Unit (SSRTU), Digital Electronics Unit (DEU), and Inertial Sensor Assembly (ISA) as well as a modified guidance section wiring harness. Design improvements reduce inherent oscillator drift, provide range discrimination, and improve reliability.

(3) AIM-54 ECCM/Sealed Missile. The DEU front receiver has been modified and an improved version of the program memory has been added to enhance ECCM capabilities. Heaters have been added, operating temperatures of selected subassemblies have been increased, and circuit temperature compensation has been added for sealed operation. The SSRTU has been modified to improve ECCM performance, selected subassemblies have been improved to increase operating temperature ranges, circuit temperature compensation has been added for sealed operation, and the ISA has been modified to include a heater for sealed operation.

b. Armament Section

(1) AIM-54A. The MK 11 MOD 3 EA modification upgrades the Target Detecting Device (TDD) to improve warhead lethality against short targets.

(2) AIM-54C. The AIM-54C has a new TDD, the DSU-28, utilizing the MK 82 MOD 0 warhead. The MK 82 MOD 0 warhead is used with the DSU-28 on AIM-54C All-Up-Round (AUR), serial number 83001 through 83054. A new warhead, WDU-29/B was incorporated in the FY83 production of the AIM-54C AUR starting with serial number 83055. The new warhead offers a 20-25 percent increase in effectiveness.

(3) AIM-54C ECCM/Sealed Missile. The AIM-54C ECCM/Sealed Missile uses the same armament section as the AIM-54C.

c. Propulsion Section. The AIM-54A, AIM-54C, and AIM-54C ECCM/Sealed Missile use the MK 47 MOD 1 rocket motor assembly.

d. Control Section

(1) AIM-54A. The HAP modification improves capabilities against very high and fast flying targets.

(2) AIM-54C. The Electronic Servo Control Amplifier (ESCA) replaces the autopilot unit in the AIM-54A control section.

(3) AIM-54 ECCM/Sealed Missile. The Electrical Conversion Unit (ECU) has been completely redesigned for sealed operations. The new design requires no heater for temperature regulation.

2. Physical Description. The dimensions and weight of the Phoenix Missile are as follows:

Length 156 inches

Diameter 15 inches

Wing span 36 inches

Fin span 36 inches

Weight, AIM-54A 1000 pounds

Weight, AIM-54C 1020-1040 pounds

Weight AIM-54C ECCM/Sealed Missile 1023 pounds

Note: Weight varies with missile configuration.

3. Introduction. The Phoenix Missile was introduced as new production. The AIM-54C was introduced to the fleet in August 1982 as an upgrade to the AIM-54A. The AIM-54C ECCM/Sealed Missile was introduced to the fleet in February 1985 as a configuration Engineering Change Proposal (ECP) to the AIM-54C.

4. Significant Interfaces. The F-14A/B/D aircraft missile interface system consists of launchers, weapons rails, multi-purpose pylons, and Phoenix adapter assemblies. The launcher LAU-93 series is used to carry and launch the AIM-54A and AIM-54C from the F-14A/B. The launcher LAU-132 is used to carry and launch the AIM-54C ECCM/Sealed Missile from the F-14D.

5. New Features, Configurations, or Material. Not Applicable (NA).

H. CONCEPTS

1. Operational Concept. The Phoenix Missile is employed by F-14 aircrew during air-to-air combat missions, primarily against medium and long-range aerial threats. The F-14 aircraft can be configured with up to six Phoenix Missiles.

2. Maintenance Concept. Maintenance of the Phoenix Missile employed on the F-14A/B and the F-14D aircraft is accomplished using the basic maintenance philosophy outlined in OPNAVINST 4790.2 (series), and specific weapons maintenance instructions outlined in OPNAVINST 8600.2 (series).

a. Organizational. Organizational-level maintenance units receive the Phoenix Missile as an AUR. Work Center 230 manned by Navy Aviation Ordnanceman (AO) personnel with Navy Enlisted Classification (NEC) 8335 and 8835 (F-14D) or 8345 and 8845 (F-14A/B) perform organizational level maintenance. Phoenix Missile readiness can be verified on deck or in the air by the aircrew. Organizational-level maintenance tasks include:

    • Aircraft and weapon system inspections
    • Aircraft and weapon system release and control system checks
    • Weapon uploading and downloading
    • Weapon arming and de-arming
    • On aircraft weapon test
    • Discrepancy reporting
    • Complying with Technical Directives
    • Record keeping and reporting

b. Intermediate. Intermediate Maintenance Activities' Weapons Departments (shipboard and Naval Air Stations) receive AURs from the Naval Weapons Station (NWS), and launchers from the supply system or Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance Department (AIMD). Phoenix Missile maintenance is performed by Weapons Department AO personnel with NEC 6801. Navy AO personnel with NEC 6802 functionally test the launchers at AIMD Work Center 710. Weapons Department intermediate-level maintenance tasks include:

    • Visually inspect for damage and corrosion
    • Perform corrosion control procedures
    • De-containerize and containerize AUR
    • Install and remove wings and fins
    • Ready service inspection
    • Record keeping and reporting
    • Prepare AUR for shipping or storage
    • Technical Directive implementation
    • Deliver missile to organizational activity

c. Depot. OPNAVINST 8600.2b divides depot-level maintenance into two sub-levels: Naval Weapon Station and Designated Overhaul Point (DOP). The Integrated Logistics Support Plan (ILSP) for the AIM-54 Phoenix Air-to-Air Guided Missile also divides depot-level maintenance into two sub-levels: AUR depot-level maintenance and depot-level maintenance. This document will use the terms described in the OPNAVINST 8600.2B.

(1) Naval Weapons Station. NWS Seal Beach (Fallbrook Annex), California, and NWS Yorktown, Virginia, are the AUR depot-level maintenance activities for the Phoenix Missile. Naval Airborne Weapons Maintenance Unit (NAWMU)-1, Guam, also performs NWS maintenance for forward deployed assets. NWS maintenance tasks include:

    • Visual inspection for damage and corrosion
    • Fault isolation by AUR test to faulty section
    • Repair by replacement of failed sections and external components
    • Perform corrosion control procedures
    • Containerize AUR for storage or loadout
    • Technical Directive implementation
    • Recertification of AUR by retest
    • Record keeping and reporting
    • Minor container repair

(2) Designated Overhaul Point. The DOP is responsible for maintenance beyond the capabilities of the NWS (depot level AUR) activities, including major overhaul or complete rebuild of sections or subassemblies required to restore defective sections and repairable Shop Replaceable Assemblies (SRAs) to original acceptance standards. DOP maintenance is performed on warheads, containers, wings, and fins at the NWS Yorktown, Virginia. Container DOP maintenance is performed at NWS Seal Beach (Fallbrook Annex), California, and NWS Seal Beach, California. Guidance, control section, and internal sensor assembly DOP maintenance is performed at Letterkenny Army Depot, Chambersburg, Pennsylvania. Rocket motor assembly and igniter DOP maintenance is performed at Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC) Indian Head Division, Maryland. Serviceable sections and components repaired by the DOP, are returned to the NWS.

d. Interim Maintenance. The Phoenix Missile has achieved full organic support. The Navy Support Date (NSD) for the AIM-54A was May 1977, and was March 1988 for the AIM-54C and AIM-54C ECCM/Sealed.

e. Life Cycle Maintenance Plan. The Serviceable In-Service Time (SIST) defines an interval during which a missile or missile component is in a serviceable condition. SIST for AIM-54A is 18 months after testing at the NWS, and 24 months for the AIM-54C and AIM-54C ECCM/Sealed.

3. Manning Concept. The Phoenix Missile has no direct impact on existing manpower requirements at organizational, intermediate, or depot level activities. Pilot and Navy Flight Officer (NFO) manpower is driven by seat factor and crew ratio. Enlisted manning for fleet squadrons, Fleet Readiness Squadrons (FRS), and intermediate maintenance activities is based on the total assigned workload for air-launched weapons, not only on specific Phoenix Missile requirements. Skills required to support the Phoenix Missile are considered to be within the capability of existing NECs. Refer to Part II for existing intermediate maintenance manpower requirements.

The Navy Squadron Training Matrices (COMNAVAIRPACINST 3500.67C/ COMNAVAIRLANTINST 3500.63C) for the F-14 aircraft was used to estimate peacetime manpower requirements for the Phoenix Missile. These instructions provide annual aircrew training requirements, which include events that involve captive carry and live fire of ordnance. For F-14 squadrons, the only training events that involve the use of the Phoenix Missile or its associated Captive Air Training Missile (CATM) are event number 20, AIM-7/AIM-54 Live Shot, and event number 61, Low/Slow Intercept. For both events, the requirement is intended to provide radar missile qualification, and therefore, there is an option of using either an AIM-7 (Sparrow Missile) or a Phoenix Missile for the live shot, and either a Sparrow or Phoenix CATM for the low/slow intercept. The live shot is required once every three years per aircrewman, while the low/slow intercept is required nine times per year (three intercepts every 120 days) per aircrewman. Using a worst case of one sortie per low/slow intercept, and based on eighteen aircrewman per squadron, there is a possibility of 168 Phoenix Missile/CATM loading-downloading cycles per F-14 squadron (162 low/slow intercept events plus 6 live shot events). Loading cycles include de-containerizing, transport, assembly, upload, download, disassembly, transport, and containerizing of the Phoenix Missile or CATM. Thus five F-14 AOs (NEC 8335, 8345, 8835, or 8845) and three Weapons Department AO 6801 are required to support annual Phoenix Missile/CATM loading cycles per F-14 squadron, even though only a portion of their workload will be driven by the Phoenix Missile.

4. Training Concept. The Phoenix Missile training concept is divided into organizational and intermediate-levels of maintenance based on OPNAVINST 8600.2 (series). Organizational-level training is provided to operator and maintenance personnel. Operator training is provided for F-14 pilot and NFO personnel. Organizational-level maintenance training is provided to AO personnel awarding NECs 8845, 8335, and 8345. Intermediate-level training is provided to AO personnel awarding NEC 6801.

A new training concept for most aviation maintenance training has been established. This concept entails dividing "A" School courses into two or more segments called core and strand, and C1 courses into separate initial and career training courses. "A" School Core courses include general knowledge and skills training for the particular rating, while "A" School strand courses focus on the more specialized training requirements for that rating and a specific aircraft or equipment, based on the student's fleet activity destination. Strand training immediately follows core training and is part of the "A" School. Upon completion of core and strand "A" School, graduates attend the appropriate initial "C" school for additional specific training. Initial "C" school training is intended for students with a paygrade of E-4 and below. Career "C" school training is provided to personnel E-5 and above to enhance their skills and knowledge within their field. Selected Reserve (SELRES) training is conducted by the Naval Air Reserve at each squadron site in accordance with current Commander, Naval Air Reserve Force (CNARF) instructions. The training is segmented and tailored for use by SELRES personnel during weekend drill periods and two-week active duty periods. If SELRES personnel and training quotas are available, CNARF must coordinate with appropriate quota controls to get training quotas at the FRS.

a. Initial Training. All initial training has been completed. No further initial training is planned.

b. Follow-on Training. Follow-on training for the Phoenix Missile is available as part of courses taught at Fleet Readiness Squadron (FRS), VF-101, Naval Air Station (NAS) Oceana, Virginia; Naval Strike and Air Warfare Center (NSAWC) N7 (Topgun); Strike Weapons And Tactics School, Atlantic (SWATSLANT), NAS Oceana; Maintenance Training Unit (MTU) 1007, Naval Air Maintenance Training Group Detachment (NAMTRAGRU DET), NAS Oceana, Virginia; MTU 4030, NAMTRAGRU DET, Naval Station (NS) Mayport, Florida; MTU 4032, NAMTRAGRU DET, NAS Norfolk, Virginia; and MTU 4033, NAMTRAGRU DET, NAS North Island, California, and MTU 4035, NAS Whidbey Island. Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) training is available through Navy School, Explosive Ordnance Disposal (NAVSCOLEOD), Eglin Air Force Base, Florida. The Phoenix Missile causes no change in student throughput or chargeable student billets. Follow-on training courses have all been modified to include the updated AIM-54C ECCM/Sealed.

(1) Operator Training. Pilots and NFOs are trained at VF-101 NAS Oceana for specific aircraft operation, tactic skills, and ordnance delivery. More in-depth training on the Phoenix Missile is provided by SWATSLANT and NSAWC N7. Training Devices (TDs) used for operator proficiency training include:

    • Weapon Systems Trainer (WST). The F-14 community uses the WST 2F169 and WST 2F153, commonly referred to as "dome trainers", to simulate engagements and to practice weapons employment procedures and tactics. These TDs contain programmed Phoenix Missile scenarios, and are shared by the FRS and the operational squadrons that are shore-based between deployments.
    • Captive Air Training Missile (CATM). The Phoenix CATM, designated as ATM-54A or ATM-54C are equivalent to tactical missiles in weight, balance, and external appearance. A Phoenix CATM consists of functional guidance and control sections and inert armament and propulsion sections.
    • Air Evaluation Missile (AEM). AEMs are telemetry-equipped missiles required for live firings in Follow-On Test and Evaluation (FOT&E), operational readiness evaluation, test and evaluation, and fleet readiness.
    • Air Training Missile (ATM). ATMs are equivalent to tactical missiles in weight, balance, and external appearance. The ATM consists of a tactical guidance, control, and propulsion section. The armament section fuze, fuze booster, and explosive lead have been removed to prevent warhead detonation upon target intercept. ATMs function identical to tactical missiles and are used for live firings at airborne targets during fleet training exercises.

The following table lists the applicable operator training courses. The Phoenix Missile source material has been incorporated in these courses with minimal impact. The Phoenix Missile causes no change in student throughput or chargeable student billets, and, therefore, these courses will not appear in Parts II and III. For complete course listings, please refer to NTP A-50-8511A.

Table I-1 Operator Courses

COURSE NUMBER

COURSE TITLE

RFT DATE FOR PHOENIX

D-2A-1601

F-14 Pilot Category 1

On-line

D-2A-1602

F-14 Pilot Category 2

On-line

D-2A-1603

F-14 Pilot Category 3

On-line

D-2A-1604

F-14 Pilot Category 4

On-line

D-2A-1605

F-14 Pilot Instructor Under Training (IUT) Category 5

On-line

D-2D-1601

F-14 Naval Flight Officer Category 1

On-line

D-2D-1602

F-14 Naval Flight Officer Category 2

On-line

D-2D-1603

F-14 Naval Flight Officer Category 3

On-line

D-2D-1604

F-14 Naval Flight Officer Category 4

On-line

D-2D-1605

F-14 Naval Flight Officer (IUT) Category 5

On-line

D-2A-1631

F-14D Category 1 Replacement Pilot

On-line

D-2A-1634

F-14D Category 2 Replacement Pilot

On-line

D-2A-1637

F-14D Category 3 Replacement Pilot

On-line

D-2A-1640

F-14D Category 4 Replacement Pilot

On-line

D-2D-1631

F-14D Naval Flight Officer Category 1

On-line

D-2D-1634

F-14D Naval Flight Officer Category 2

On-line

D-2D-1637

F-14D Naval Flight Officer Category 3

On-line

D-2D-1640

F-14D Naval Flight Officer Category 4

On-line

None

F-14 Strike Fighter Advanced Readiness Program

On-line

None

F-14 Strike Fighter Weapons Employment

On-line

      1. Initial Skills - Maintenance. Initial skills training for the Aviation Ordnanceman rating is provided by the AO A1 School at NAS Pensacola, Florida. The following table lists the applicable initial skills courses for the AO rating. Phoenix source material has been incorporated in these courses with minimal impact. This caused no change in student throughput or chargeable student billets; therefore, these courses will not appear in Parts II and III.

Table I-2 Initial Skills - Maintenance Courses

COURSE

NUMBER

COURSE TITLE

RFT DATE FOR PHOENIX

C-646-2011

Aviation Ordnanceman Common Core Class A1

On-line

C-646-2012

Aviation Ordnanceman Airwing Strand Class A1

On-line

C-646-2013

Aviation Ordnanceman Ship's Company Strand Class A1

On-line

(3) Organizational Maintenance. Organizational-level maintenance personnel are trained at the appropriate MTU for specific aircraft maintenance. Weapon loading skills are further enhanced at SWATSLANT and through on-board proficiency training. TDs for Phoenix organizational-level maintenance training include:

    • Dummy Air Training Missile (DATM)-54A. The DATM-54A is an inert, replica of the Phoenix Missile, which adequately satisfies the organizational-level training requirements for the Phoenix Missile. It facilitates instruction and familiarization of Phoenix Missile handling, loading, and visual inspection procedures for organizational-level maintenance training purposes. The DATM-54A is not certified for flight and is designed for ground training use only. Phoenix CATMs are suitable replacements for the Phoenix DATM-54A. For detailed information on TDs refer to element IV.A.2.

The following table lists the applicable organizational-level maintenance training courses. Phoenix Missile source material has been incorporated in these courses with minimal impact. This caused no change in student throughput or chargeable student billets; therefore, these courses will not appear in Parts II and III. For complete course listings, please refer to NTP A-50-8511A.

Table I-3 Organizational-Level Maintenance Courses

COURSE

NUMBER

COURSE TITLE

RFT DATE FOR PHOENIX

C-646-9962

F-14A/B Armament Systems Initial Organizational Maintenance

On-line

C-646-9963

F-14A/B Armament Systems Career Organizational Maintenance

On-line

D-646-9906

F-14D Armament Systems Organizational Maintenance (Difference)

On-line

D-646-1644

F-14A/B Conventional Weapons Loading Team

On-line

D-646-1645

F-14A/B Integrated Weapons Team Training

On-line

D-646-1646

F-14D Conventional Weapons Loading

On-line

D-646-1648

F-14D Integrated Weapons Team Training

On-line

(4) Intermediate Maintenance. Intermediate-level maintenance personnel are trained at the appropriate MTU for specific weapon maintenance. TDs for Phoenix intermediate-level maintenance training include:

    • DATM-54A. The Phoenix DATM-54A satisfies the intermediate-level training requirements for the Phoenix Missile. It facilitates instruction and familiarization of Phoenix Missile de-containerizing, handling, transporting, and visual inspection procedures for intermediate-level maintenance training purposes. The DATM-54A is not certified for flight and is designed for ground training use only. The Phoenix CATMs are suitable replacements for the DATM-54A. For detailed information on TDs refer to element IV.A.2.

The following table lists intermediate-level maintenance training courses that had Phoenix Missile source material incorporated with minimal impact. These updates caused no change in student throughput or chargeable student billets; therefore, these courses will not appear in Parts II and III.

Table I-4 Intermediate-Level Maintenance Courses

COURSE

NUMBER

COURSE TITLE

RFT DATE FOR AIM-7M/P

C-646-4108

Air Launched Weapons Ordnance Supervisor

On-line

C-646-4109

Weapons Department General Ordnance

On-line

The following courses were updated to include Phoenix Missile data, but course lengths were not affected.

Title ....................

Air Launched Guided Missiles Intermediate Maintenance

CIN ....................

C-122-3111A (part of D/E-646-7007)

Model Manager...

MTU 4030, NAMTRAGRU DET, Naval Station (NS) Mayport

Description .........

From Catalog of Navy Training Courses (CANTRAC): To provide ordnance personnel with knowledge of the Sparrow, Sidewinder, Phoenix, Sidearm, AMRAAM, Maverick, Harpoon, SLAM, HARM, Walleye, TALD, and Air Nitrogen Purifier Units.

Locations ............

MTU 4030, NAMTRAGRU DET, NS Mayport

MTU 4032, NAMTRAGRU DET, NAS Norfolk

MTU 4033, NAMTRAGRU DET, NAS North Island

MTU 4035, NAMTRAGRU DET, Whidbey Island

Length ................

11 days

RFT date ............

Currently available

Skill identifier .....

AO 6801

TTE/TD .............

CNU-242A/E, ADU-399A/E, ADU-406/E, MHU-129/E, ADU-433A/E, ADU-434A/E, DATM-54A

Prerequisite .........

C-646-2013 Aviation Ordnanceman Ship's Company Strand Class A1

(5) Explosive Ordnance Disposal Training. EOD training is conducted at NSWC Indian Head Division, Maryland. The TDs required for EOD training are the Practical Explosive Ordnance Disposal System Trainer (PEST) and the Classroom Explosive System Trainer (CEST), however, salvaged of inert tactical missiles and/or components and CATMs are used in their place, as Phoenix PEST and CEST were never developed nor procured. Phoenix CATMs do not contain the safe and arm components required for teaching practical application of Render Safe Procedures (RSP):

    • Practical Explosive Ordnance Disposal System Trainer (PEST). The basic performance requirements for a PEST are: 1) to replicate the external features of tactical missile for visual identification purposes; 2) to possess the same weight and center of gravity as the tactical missile for handling realism; 3) to contain inert explosive train components; and 4) to disassemble identically to the tactical missile (where applicable) in order to practice RSPs. A Phoenix PEST was never developed nor procured, however, practical training requirements for the Phoenix Missile are currently met through the use of salvaged inert tactical missiles and/or components and CATMs.
    • Classroom Explosive System Trainer (CEST). The basic performance requirements for a CEST are: 1) to replicate the external features of tactical missile for visual identification purposes; 2) to contain inert explosive train components; and 3) to provide cut-away areas in its exterior in order to view the inert explosive train components for teaching RSPs. A Phoenix CEST was never developed nor procured; however, classroom training requirements for Phoenix Missile are currently supported through the use of salvaged inert tactical missiles and/or components and CATMs that have been modified (cut-away) to view internal, inert explosive components. For detailed information on TDs refer to element IV.A.2.

The following table lists the applicable EOD training courses. Phoenix Missile source material has been incorporated in these courses with minimal impact. This caused no change in student throughput or chargeable student billets; therefore, these courses will not appear in Parts II and III.

Table I-5 Explosive Ordnance Disposal Courses

COURSE

NUMBER

COURSE TITLE

RFT DATE FOR PHOENIX

A-431-0011

Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) Phase II (Navy)

On-line

A-431-0012

Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) Phase II

On-line

G-431-0001

EOD Pre-deployment Team Training

On-line

c. Student Profiles. The following enlisted manpower and personnel classifications are required to support the Phoenix Missile. In many instances, AO personnel who support the Phoenix Missile do not possess the component NEC because they attained their primary NEC prior to the recent A School and C School changes.

Table I-6 Phoenix Missile Student Profiles

RATING and NEC or MOS

TITLE

COMPONENT NEC or MOS

AO 8835

F-14D Armament System Organizational Apprentice Maintenance Technician

AO 0000

AO 8335

F-14D System Organizational Maintenance Technician

AO 8835

AO 8845

F-14 Armament System Organizational Apprentice Maintenance Technician

AO 0000

AO 8345

F-14A/B System Organizational Maintenance Technician

AO 8845

AO 6801

Air Launched Weapons Technician

AO 0000

 

d. Training Pipelines. The following training pipelines and tracks correspond to student profiles listed above. These pipelines and tracks are based on the training system that is in place today, and may not reflect actual progressions for personnel who completed formal training prior to the recent A School and C School changes. Shaded courses were affected by introduction of the AIM-54C ECCM/Sealed. Training tracks and associated courses are available in the OPNAV Aviation Training Management System (OATMS).

AO 0000

®

AO 8845

®

AO 8335

Aviation

F-14 Armament Systems

F-14D Systems Organizational

Ordnanceman

Organizational Apprentice

Maintenance Technician

Class A1

Maintenance Technician

Airwing Strand

TRACK D-646-1647

TRACK D-646-1640

C-646-2011

C-600-3601

C-600-3601

C-646-2012

C-646-9962

C-646-9963

D-646-1644

C-646-9906

Figure I-1 F-14D Systems Organizational Maintenance Technician Career Progression

AO 0000

®

AO 8845

®

AO 8345

Aviation

F-14 Armament Systems

F-14A/B Systems Organizational

Ordnanceman

Organizational Apprentice

Maintenance Technician

Class A1

Maintenance Technician

Airwing Strand

TRACK D-646-1647

TRACK D-646-1641

C-646-2011

C-600-3601

C-600-3601

C-646-2012

C-646-9962

C-646-9963

D-646-1644

Figure I-2 F-14A/B Systems Organizational Maintenance Technician Career Progression


AO 0000

AO 6801

Aviation

Air Launched

Ordnanceman

Weapons Technician

Class A1

(Intermediate)

Ship's Company Strand

TRACK D/E-646-7007

C-646-2011

C-600-3601

C-646-2013

C-122-3111

C-122-3113

C-646-4106

C-646-4109

Figure I-3 Air Launched Weapons Technician Career Progression

 

I. ON-BOARD (IN-SERVICE) TRAINING

1. Proficiency or Other Organic Training.

      1. Maintenance Training Improvement Program. The Maintenance Training Improvement Program (MTIP) is an effective and efficient training system that is responsive to fleet training requirements. It consists of a bank of test questions that are managed through automated data processing. The Deputy Chief of Staff for Training assists in the development of MTIP by providing those question banks (software) already developed by the Navy. MTIP is implemented in accordance with OPNAVINST 4790.2F. MTIP is a training management tool that, through diagnostic testing, identifies individual training deficiencies at both the organizational- and intermediate-levels of maintenance. MTIP allows increased effectiveness in the application of training resources through identification of skill and knowledge deficiencies at the activity, work center, or individual technician level. Remedial training is concentrated where needed to combat identified skill and knowledge shortfalls.
      2. Aviation Maintenance In-Service Training. Aviation Maintenance In-Service Training (AMIST) is intended to support Fleet training requirements now satisfied by MTIP and in that sense is the planned replacement. However, it is structured very differently and will function as an integral part of the new Aviation Maintenance Training Continuum System (AMTCS) that will replace the existing aviation maintenance training structure. AMIST will provide standardized instruction to bridge the training gaps between initial and career training. With the implementation of AMIST, the technician will be provided the training required to maintain a level of proficiency necessary to perform effectively the required tasks to reflect a career progression. AMTCS redesigns the aviation training process (training continuum), and introduces Computer Based Training (CBT) throughout the Navy technical training process. The application and adoption of recent advances in computer hardware and software technology have enabled CBT with its basic elements of Computer Managed Instruction (CMI), Computer Aided Instruction (CAI), and Interactive Courseware (ICW) to be integrated into the training continuum and provide essential support for standardizing technical training.
      3. Strike Fighter Training Program (SFTP). NSAWC N7 (Topgun), SFWSL, SFWSP, and SWATSLANT, are developing post-FRS training at the squadron level for Navy Strike Fighter aircraft (F-14 and F/A-18). This post-FRS training continuum is known as the SFTP and is composed of three equally critical elements: the Strike Fighter Weapons and Tactics (SFWT) curricula, the Strike Fighter Tactics Instructor (SFTI), and the Strike Fighter Training System (SFTS). The SFWT curricula will be taught by each squadron's SFTI, who will be supported by the SFTS, a multimedia computer-based training system that will host CMI, CAI, CBT and ICW. Aircrew weapons proficiency training will continue to be accomplished using existing methods: Academic, Simulator (WTT/ WST), CATM and/or embedded aircraft simulation, and live missile shots supported by the Non-Combat Expenditure Allowance. However, capability ratings will be based on performance rather than completion, i.e., it will not be based simply upon completing the training events, but upon how well they are completed. Training events will be measured using defined metrics, and collectively these events will be evaluated to determine actual combat readiness, quantitatively (objectively) rather than qualitatively (subjectively).

2. Personnel Qualification Standards. Not Applicable (NA).

3. Other On-Board or In-service Training Packages.

      1. Conventional Weapon Technical Proficiency Inspection. The Conventional Weapon Technical Proficiency Inspection (CWTPI) is a graded inspection administered by either SFWSP, SFWSL, or SWATSLANT. The CWTPI covers all areas of conventional weapon load and release, and control systems checks. The inspection evaluates the squadron's ability to wire-check, upload and download conventional ordnance, use applicable publications, and place ordnance on its designated target. The squadron inspection is conducted annually, six months prior to deployment, or at the request of the squadron's Commanding Officer. A written examination is required by all personnel directly involved in the inspection, including squadron pilots. A 72 hour time limit is granted for the completion of the entire evolution. The final grade is an average score derived from the written exams, ordnance loads, wire checks, and the pilot's proficiency to deliver weapons on target. Pre-inspection training is provided by the appropriate SFWS followed by the CWTPI. The CWTPI determines the need for further conventional weapons load training of squadron AO and Aviation Electronics Technician personnel at the appropriate school.

J. LOGISTICS SUPPORT

1. Manufacturer and Contract Numbers.

CONTRACT NUMBER

MANUFACTURER

ADDRESS

N00019-89-C-0079

N00019-90-C-0069

Hughes Aircraft Co.

Tucson, Arizona

N00019-89-C-0112

Raytheon

Lowell, Massachusetts

2. Program Documentation. The current ILSP is ILSP No. MS-027, approved October 1993.

3. Technical Data Plan. Navy technical publication requirements are identified in Technical Manual Control Requirements (TMCR) and Work Requests (WR) issued by the Naval Air Technical Data and Engineering Command. Each TMCR and WR identifies the required technical manuals or technical source data to be furnished, the general and detailed technical content, and the preparation specifications. NA-01-AIM54-0 lists all technical manuals required for the AIM-54A, AIM-54C and AIM-54C ECCM/Sealed Missiles. Manuals required for training are currently available and listed in element IV.B.3 of this NTSP.

4. Test Sets, Tools, and Test Equipment

a. Test Sets. The AN/DSM-130 Guided Missile Test Set (GMTS), used at the NWS for testing the AUR, is an integrated test set designed for computer controlled testing of the AIM-54A, AIM-54C, and AIM-54C ECCM/Sealed.

DOP depot-level test sets have been delivered. AIM-54A depot level test sets were modified for use with the AIM-54C and AIM-54C ECCM/Sealed Missile configuration testing. The following test sets and stations were modified:

    • Unit/Assembly Test Station - 1046245
    • Flexible Automatic Circuit Tester - 1046290
    • Guidance Section Test Station - N089122-4
    • Control Section Test Station - N089122-5

Letterkenny Army Depot, Chambersburg, Pennsylvania, test station requirements for the AIM-54C and AIM-54C ECCM/Sealed Missile configurations are:

    • DEU Test Station - 1351200
    • Front/Rear Receiver Test Station - 1128620
    • Digital Chassis Test Station - 1351500
    • ISA Test Station - 1351951
    • Receiver-Transmitter Test Station - 1352000
    • Programmable Read-Only Memory Test Station - 1046240
    • Hybrid Test Station (analog) - 1351600
    • Hybrid Test Station (digital) - 1351800

AIM-54A test stations that do not support the AIM-54C and AIM-54C ECCM/Sealed Missile will no longer be required when AIM-54A inventories are depleted.

b. Tools. The Phoenix Missile did not introduce any new peculiar tools.

c. Other Support Equipment. The following table lists the Phoenix Missile peculiar support equipment.

Table I-7 Phoenix Peculiar Support Equipment

EQUIPMENT

DESIGNATOR or PART NUMBER

USE

Container, AUR

CNU-242A/E

Shipping/storage of 2 AURs

Adapter, guided missile

ADU-399A/E

Adapting missile to skids and trailers for transport

Adapter, trailer

ADU-406/E

Adapting missile to trailer for transport

Beam, hoisting

MHU-129/E

Adapting missile to hook lift devices

Height adapter (aft)

ADU-433A/E

Adapting missile to trailer for transport

Height adapter (forward)

ADU-434A/E

Adapting missile to trailer for transport

5. Repair Parts. The Material Support Date (MSD) for the AIM-54A was achieved April 1975, and the MSD for the AIM-54C and AIM-54 ECCM/Sealed was achieved August 1986. Repair parts are available through the Navy supply system. Normal replenishment procedures based upon demand and usage are used to maintain stock levels of spares, repair parts, and consumables.

6. Human Systems Integration. NA.

K. SCHEDULES

1. Schedule of Events. The AIM-54A attained initial operational capability in 1974 as the principal long-range defense armament of the F-14 Aircraft. Approximately 2,500 production AIM-54A missiles were delivered between 1972 and October 1980.

The AIM-54C missile attained initial operational capability in December 1986. Approximately 300 production AIM-54C missile were delivered between August 1982 August 1986.

The AIM-54C ECCM/Sealed attained initial operational capability in 1988. Approximately 1900 production AIM-54C ECCM/Sealed Missiles were delivered between February 1986 and September 1992. All fleet deliveries are complete. NSD was attained in September 1991. All training activities are currently Ready For Training (RFT).

a. Installation and Delivery Schedules. Phoenix Missile schedules are classified and are contained in the Weapon Systems Planning Document for the Phoenix Missile, NAVAIRNOTE C13100 of 5 January 1996.

b. Ready For Operational Use Schedule. The Phoenix Missile is currently considered to be ready for operational use.

c. Time Required to Install at Operational Sites. The Phoenix Missile is delivered as an AUR.

d. Foreign Military Sales and Other Source Delivery Schedule. NA.

e. Training Device and Delivery Schedule. One hundred twenty-two CATMs and 23 DATMs have been delivered to the fleet. For the most up-to-date list of the location of the TDs, a current listing from Conventional Ammunition Integrated Management System (CAIMS) should be obtained. Element IV.A.2 of this NTSP contains information on locations of TDs.

L. GOVERNMENT FURNISHED EQUIPMENT AND CONTRACTOR FURNISHED EQUIPMENT TRAINING REQUIREMENTS. NA

M. RELATED NTSPs AND OTHER APPLICABLE DOCUMENTS

Table I-8 Related NTSPs and Other Applicable Documents

DOCUMENT OR NTSP TITLE

DOCUMENT OR

NTSP NUMBER

PDA CODE

STATUS

F-14 A/B/D Aircraft

N88-NTSP-A-50-8511B/D

PMA205

Draft August 1998

Phoenix Missile System ILSP

MS-027

AIR-4101L2

Approved October 1993

Phoenix Operational Logistics Support Plan

MS-020

AIR-4181C2

Approved January 1989



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