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APPROVED

NAVY TRAINING SYSTEM PLAN

FOR THE

MARINE CORPS MINIMUM OPERATING

STRIP LIGHTING SYSTEM

N88-NTSP-A-50-9802/A

NOVEMBER 1999

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

This Proposed Navy Training System Plan for the Marine Corps Minimum Operating Strip Lighting System (MOSLS) was developed by the Naval Air Systems Command using the Navy Training Requirements Documentation Manual. It provides an estimate of the manpower, personnel, and training requirements required to support the MOSLS. The MOSLS is currently in Phase III (Production, Development, and Operational Support) of the Weapon System Acquisition Process.

The MOSLS is a fully self-contained, portable, rapidly deployable, stand alone, emergency and contingency airfield lighting and landing aids system. Marine Wing Support Groups, in support of Marine Corps Expeditionary Airfield operations responding to regional contingencies, employ the MOSLS. MOSLS is designed to be operated day or night, and is compatible with night vision goggles. The individual components of the MOSLS can be operated manually, or via a remote control unit. Marine Corps Aircraft Recovery Specialists (MCARS) with Military Occupational Specialty (MOS) 7011 operate the MOSLS.

The maintenance plan for the MOSLS is based on three levels of maintenance, organizational, intermediate, and depot. The objectives of the maintenance plan are to prevent deterioration of inherent system reliability, and assure operative safety of the equipment and the aircraft it supports with minimum expenditure of maintenance and support resources. Organizational level personnel perform all scheduled maintenance and all repairs to the MOSLS, with the exception of maintenance actions requiring soldering, repairs to printed circuit boards, and extensive engine repairs. MCARS with MOS 7011 perform all scheduled maintenance actions and repairs to the MOSLS. No increase of MCARS with MOS 7011 is required to operate or maintain the MOSLS.

Naval Air Warfare Center Aircraft Division Lakehurst, New Jersey, engineering and contractor personnel will conduct formal initial MOSLS operator and maintenance training at Naval Air Technical Training Center (NATTC) Pensacola, Florida, in June 1999.

Follow-on training for MOSLS will be accomplished by adding MOSLS operator and maintenance information to the existing Marine Expeditionary Airfield Equipment course, C-604-2015. No increase in course length is anticipated. The Ready For Training date of the updated course is October 1999.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Page

Executive Summary i

List of Acronyms iii

Preface v

PART I - TECHNICAL PROGRAM DATA

A. Nomenclature-Title-Program I-1

B. Security Classification I-1

C. Manpower, Personnel, and Training Principals I-1

D. System Description I-2

E. Developmental Test and Operational Test I-2

F. Aircraft and/or Equipment/System/Subsystem Replaced I-2

G. Description of New Development I-3

H. Concepts I-5

I. On-Board (In-Service) Training I-8

J. Logistics Support I-9

K. Schedules I-10

L. Government Furnished Equipment and Contractor Furnished Equipment

Training Requirements I-12

M. Related NTSPs and Other Applicable Documents I-12

PART II - BILLET AND PERSONNEL REQUIREMENTS II-1

PART III - TRAINING REQUIREMENTS III-1

PART IV - TRAINING LOGISTICS SUPPORT REQUIREMENTS IV-1

PART V - MPT MILESTONES V-1

PART VI - DECISION ITEMS/ACTION REQUIRED VI-1

PART VII - POINTS OF CONTACT VII-1

LIST OF ACRONYMS

CIN

Course Identification Number

CMC

Commandant of the Marine Corps

CNET

Commander Naval Education and Training

CNO

Chief of Naval Operations

   

FCTP

Foreign Comparative Test Program

FY

Fiscal Year

   

ILSP

Integrated Logistics Support Plan

   

MCALF

Marine Corps Auxiliary Landing Field

MCARS

Marine Corps Aircraft Recovery Specialist

MCCDC

Marine Corps Combat Development Command

MCEA

Marine Corps Expeditionary Airfield

MEAEC

Marine Expeditionary Airfield Equipment Course

MOS

Military Occupational Specialty

MOSKIT

Minimum Operating Strip Lighting Kit

MOSLS

Minimum Operating Strip Lighting System

MSU

Master Switching Unit

MWSS

Marine Wing Support Squadron

   

NA

Not Applicable

NATO

North Atlantic Treaty Organization

NATTC

Naval Air Technical Training Center

NAVAIRSYSCOM

Naval Air Systems Command

NAVICP

Navy Inventory Control Point

NAVPERSCOM

Naval Personnel Command

NAWCADLKE

Naval Air Warfare Center Aircraft Division Lakehurst

NTSP

Navy Training System Plan

NVG

Night Vision Goggle

   

OPO

OPNAV Principal Official

ORD

Operations Requirement Document

OREL

Omni-directional Runway Edge Light

   

PMA

Program Manager, Air

PAPI

Precision Approach Path Indicator

   

RAF

British Royal Air Force

RFT

Ready For Training

   

SALKIT

Supplemental Airfield Lighting Kit

   

TAC

Tactical

TD

Training Device

TTE

Technical Training Equipment

   

UAL

Uni-directional Approach Light

PREFACE

This Approved Navy Training System Plan (NTSP) for the Marine Corps Minimum Operating Strip Lighting System (MOSLS) updates the Draft NTSP, A-50-9802/D, of October 1998. Specific changes to this NTSP are as follows:

    • Updated to comply with guidelines set forth in the Navy Training Requirements Documentation Manual, Office of the Chief of Naval Operations (OPNAV) Publication P-751-1-9-97.
    • Updated manpower.

N88-NTSP-A-50-9802/P

November 1999

PART I - TECHNICAL PROGRAM DATA

A. NOMENCLATURE-TITLE-PROGRAM

1. Nomenclature-Title-Acronym. Marine Corps Minimum Operating Strip Lighting System (MOSLS)

2. Program Element. 0603512N

B. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION

1. System Characteristics Unclassified

2. Capabilities Unclassified

3. Functions Unclassified

C. MANPOWER, PERSONNEL, AND TRAINING PRINCIPALS

OPNAV Principal Official (OPO) Program Sponsor CNO (N885F)

OPO Resource Sponsor CNO (N885F)

Marine Corps Program Sponsor CMC (ASL-45)

Developing Agency NAVAIRSYSCOM (PMA251)

Training Agency MCCDC (C462)

CNET (ETE323)

Training Support Agency NAVAIRSYSCOM (PMA205)

Manpower and Personnel Mission Sponsor CNO (N12)

NAVPERSCOM (NPC-4, NPC-404)

CMC (ASM-1)

Director of Naval Training CNO (N7)

Manpower Structure Management MCCDC (C5325A)

D. SYSTEM DESCRIPTION

1. Operational Uses. The MOSLS is a portable lighting and landing aid system designed to be employed by a Marine Wing Support Group to support Marine Corps Expeditionary Airfield (MCEA) operations responding to regional contingencies. It can be rapidly deployed by a minimum number of Marines in support of the following Marine Corps mission areas:

    • Early conflict phase airfield lighting, prior to the time a full-scale MCEA is operational
    • Emergency back-up airfield lighting for a non-MCEA
    • Night Vision Goggle (NVG) operability at a MCEA
    • Enhanced covert rotary and fixed-wing aircraft operability

Offensive air support and anti-air warfare mission areas utilize aircraft, which operate from MCEAs, host nation airfields, taxiways, highways, and other unconventional surfaces. The MOSLS can be installed on any acceptable airfield surface for day or night operations, including NVG capability, in less than one hour.

2. Foreign Military Sales. Several North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) countries currently use a version of the MOSLS. Information concerning possible future Foreign Military Sales of the MOSLS may be obtained from the Expeditionary Airfield Integrated Program Team Leader, PMA251, Naval Air Systems Command (NAVAIRSYSCOM).

E. DEVELOPMENTAL TEST AND OPERATIONAL TEST. Since the MOSLS is a non-developmental procurement item, no developmental testing is required. In August 1992, the British Royal Air Force (RAF) provided a demonstration evaluation to determine if the existing RAF version of the MOSLS was suitable to fill the requirements for MCEA lighting. In March 1997, as part of the Foreign Comparative Test Program (FCTP), a Logistics Evaluation and demonstration was conducted at Marine Corps Auxiliary Landing Field (MCALF), Bogue, North Carolina. This included two weeks of initial training provided by RAF and contractor personnel to Marine Expeditionary Airfield Equipment Course (MEAEC) school instructors, Naval Air Warfare Center Aircraft Division Lakehurst (NAWCADLKE) engineering and logistics personnel, and Marine Wing Support Squadron Two Seven One (MWSS-271) personnel. The FCTP also included aircraft compatibility tests with regards to Visual Landing Aids and transportation purposes, a complete install, maintain, and a disassemble-reassemble demonstration. The RAF version of the MOSLS satisfied all requirements of the Operational Requirements Document (ORD).

F. AIRCRAFT AND/OR EQUIPMENT/SYSTEM/SUBSYSTEM REPLACED. Not Applicable (NA)

G. DESCRIPTION OF NEW DEVELOPMENT. A complete MOSLS system consists of two Minimum Operating Strip Lighting Kits (MOSKIT) and three Supplemental Airfield Lighting Kits (SALKIT). Each kit has its own trailer, battery chargers, and auxiliary equipment necessary for a self-contained system that requires minimum support.

1. Functional Description

a. Minimum Operating Strip Lighting Kit. The MOSKIT is a fully self-contained, portable, rapidly deployed, stand alone, emergency and contingency airfield lighting system. It is designed for day or night operation and is compatible with NVGs. The individual components of the MOSKIT can be operated manually or through a remote control unit. All components of the MOSKIT are water-resistant and can be operated in moderately heavy rain, sleet, or snow. The component parts of the MOSKIT are described below.

(1) Trailer Assembly. All of the components of the MOSKIT are fully self-contained in the trailer assembly. The trailer assembly consists of a chassis with compartment doors, running gear assembly, parking brake assembly, levelers, towing provisions, a spare tire, and provisions for attaching and supporting all the other components of the MOSKIT.

(2) Tactical Precision Approach Path Indicator. The Tactical Precision Approach Path Indicator (TAC PAPI) consists of two one-person portable units used to aid pilots in safely landing their aircraft. The TAC PAPI communicates glideslope information to the pilot using combinations of red and white lights. Each unit has an inclinometer to facilitate glideslope settings. A generator through a hard wire connection provides electrical power for the TAC PAPI.

(3) Night Vision Goggle Precision Approach Path Indicator. The NVG PAPI is used to communicate glideslope information to pilots using night vision goggles. It consists of four one-person portable battery powered units. Each NVG PAPI unit emits either steady or flashing lights, primarily in the infrared spectrum.

(4) Uni-directional Approach Light. The MOSKIT contains three Uni-directional Approach Lights (UAL). Two lights are used to help the pilot line up their aircraft with the centerline of the runway, while the third light is retained as a spare. A generator through a hard wire connection provides electrical power for the UAL.

(5) Omni-directional Runway Edge Light. Omni-directional Runway Edge Lights (OREL) provide the pilot with a visual definition of the perimeter of the airfield. They also assist the pilot in lining up their aircraft during final approach. There are eighteen ORELs in each MOSKIT.

(6) Generator Set. The MOSKIT includes two diesel-powered generators One generator is used to provide electrical power for the MOSKIT operations and battery recharging. The other generator provides system redundancy for improved availability. Each generator provides 2.0 kilowatts of power and 240 volts of alternating current.

(7) Cable Assembly. MOSKIT components having relatively high electrical power requirements are connected to the generator by electrical cables. The cable assemblies have fail-safe connectors to ensure cables are connected to the proper component. Cables are also designed to operate safely in two to three inches of standing water.

(8) Power Cable Reel. The power cable reel is used to reel-in and reel-out the long cable runs necessary for proper installation of the MOSKIT. The power cable reel is design integral with the MOSKIT trailer and includes a safety interlock to prevent operator injury.

(9) Battery Charger. The battery charger is used to recharge the batteries in the ORELs, NVG PAPIs, Master Switching Units (MSU), and pedometer. The battery charger is integral with the MOSKIT trailer.

(10) Pedometer. The pedometer is a distance-measuring device used to aid in laying out components of the MOSKIT along an airfield. It is battery powered and attached to the front of the MOSKIT trailer. The pedometer uses a system of lights to communicate distance traveled by the MOSKIT trailer, and can be set to give visual indications at several different distances.

(11) Master Switching Unit. The MSU is a device used to remotely control all major operational functions of a deployed MOSKIT. It can turn the ORELs, TAC PAPIs, NVG PAPIs and UALs on and off. It can also set the light intensity of the ORELs UALs, and TAC PAPIs. The MSU is a one-hand portable unit weighing less than three pounds.

(12) Omni-directional Runway Edge Light Base and Base Mounting Kit (Drill Set). When deploying the MOSKIT, the ORELs, UALs, TAC PAPIs, and NVG PAPIs can either be placed on level ground, or mounted to the ground using base plates, mounting screws, and the drill set. The bases can be mounted onto concrete, macadam, or similar surfaces. Bases have a high strength, Velcro-like surface that mates with the corresponding material on the bottom of the OREL and UAL enabling components to "stick" to the mounted base plate. A "keyed" base that mates with a corresponding plate on the bottom of the PAPI enables the PAPI to be secured to the base plate.

b. Supplemental Airfield Lighting Kit. The SALKIT consists of a trailer containing 64 ORELs used as additional lighting for runways, taxiways, and parking areas. All components can be remotely controlled by radio signal using a hand-held MSU.

(1) Supplemental Airfield Lighting Kit Trailer. The SALKIT Trailer utilizes the same trailer chassis as the MOSKIT, however, it only has provisions for carrying ORELs. The SALKIT Trailer does not contain an integral generator or cable reel.

(2) Omni-directional Runway Edge Light. The OREL used in the SALKIT is identical to that used in the MOSKIT. Blue lenses are provided for taxiway lighting.

2. Physical Description

NOMENCLATURE/EQUIPMENT

DIMENSIONS

H x W x L (inches)

WEIGHT

(pounds)

MOSKIT Trailer Assembly

70.8 x 146.8 x 64.6

3,435

Tactical Precision Approach Path Indicator

16.7 x 16.1 x 23.6

31

Night Vision Goggle Tactical Precision Approach Path Indicator

16.7 x 12.5 x 19.0

23

Uni-directional Approach Light

12.0 x 7.7 x 7.7

14

Omni-directional Runway Edge Light

12.0 x 7.7 x 7.7

16

Generator Set

22.0 x 16.0 x 30.0

140

Battery charger

10.5 x 19.0 x 14.0

95

Master Switching Unit

12.0 x 3.2 x 2.7

2.5

SALKIT Trailer

70.8 x 146.8 x 64.6

3650

3. New Development Introduction. MOSLS is being introduced as new production to MWSSs over a period of four years.

4. Significant Interfaces. NA

5. New Features, Configurations, or Material. NA

H. CONCEPTS

1. Operational Concept. Marine Corps Aircraft Recovery Specialist (MCARS), with Military Occupational Field (MOS) 7011, operate the MOSLS. Operation of MOSLS consists of turning on and off portable runway and taxiway lights, TAC PAPIs, and NVG PAPIs. MOSLS can be operated either manually or remotely. When operated manually a total of four operators are required. When operated remotely, one operator controls the entire operation.

2. Maintenance Concept. The maintenance concept for the MOSLS is based on two levels of maintenance, organizational and intermediate. The objective of the MOSLS maintenance plan is to prevent deterioration of inherent system reliability, and assure operative safety of the equipment and the aircraft it supports with minimum expenditure of maintenance and support resources. MCARS with MOS 7011 perform all organizational level scheduled maintenance and repairs of the MOSLS. Intermediate level personnel perform all maintenance actions requiring soldering, repairs to circuit boards, and extensive engine repairs. There are no scheduled depot level maintenance actions associated with the maintenance of MOSLS.

a. Organizational. Organizational level maintenance consists of preventive and corrective maintenance actions. Additionally, since MOSLS is designed as a rapidly deployable system, unpacking, set-up, breakdown, and repacking of the MOSLS is considered an organizational level maintenance function.

(1) Preventive Maintenance. Organizational level personnel perform all required preventive maintenance of the MOSLS, including performing visual inspections, standard serviceability tests, cleaning TAC PAPI lenses, and lubricating trailer chassis and generator set engines.

(2) Corrective Maintenance. Organizational level personnel perform all repairs to the MOSLS, except those requiring soldering, repairs to printed circuit boards, and extensive engine maintenance. Repairs consist of removal and replacement of subassemblies and piece parts, system adjustments, system alignments, and serviceability testing.

b. Intermediate. The nearest Marine Aviation Logistics Squadron provides intermediate level maintenance of the MOSLS. Intermediate level repair actions consist of all maintenance actions beyond the capability of organizational level maintenance and those actions that must be performed in a workshop environment.

c. Depot. Depot scheduled maintenance is not required for the MOSLS. However, the Original Equipment Manufacture (OEM) is providing depot level maintenance support on a case-by-case basis for maintenance actions such as trailer chassis repair or modification and optical alignment.

d. Interim Maintenance. NA

e. Life-Cycle Maintenance Plan. There is no singular Life-Cycle Maintenance Plan encompassing the many pieces of equipment that make up the MOSLS. Each system component failure is repaired or replaced as the failure occurs, thus maintaining the MOSLS in a constant state of maximum readiness.

3. Manning Concept. Qualitative and quantitative manpower requirements for the MOSLS are driven by the total workload associated with Marine Wing support of expeditionary airfield operations. The introduction of the MOSLS did not cause a change to current MWSS manpower requirements.

4. Training Concept. The overall objective of the training program is to provide selected Marine Corps personnel the training required to operate and maintain the MOSLS. This is being accomplished by integrating MOSLS into the existing MEAEC training.

a. Initial Training. Informal initial operator and maintenance training for the MOSLS was part of the Logistics Evaluation and Maintainability Demonstration conducted during a two-week period at MCALF Bogue in March 1997, by RAF and contractor personnel. The training was presented to MEAEC instructors, NAWCADLKE engineering and logistics personnel, and MWSS-271 personnel. Formal initial operator and maintenance training will be conducted at Naval Air Technical Training Center (NATTC) Pensacola, Florida, in June 1999.

 

Title

Formal Initial MOSLS Operator and Maintenance Training

Description

Provide NATTC Pensacola instructors, NAWCADLKE field representatives, and personnel from various MOSLS installed sites with the information required to update existing MEAEC C-604-2015 to include the operation and maintenance of MOSLS.

Location

NATTC Pensacola

Length

5 days

RFT date

June 1999

TTE/TD

Equipment used for this training will be a complete MOSLS, which will remain at the site of this formal initial training as deployable equipment. No Training Device (TD) will be required.

Prerequisites

MEAEC C-604-2015

b. Follow-on Training. Follow-on training for the MOSLS will be accomplished by adding MOSLS operator and maintenance information to the existing MEAEC C-604-2015. The course will be updated in-house at NATTC Pensacola, by the instructor personnel who have attended formal initial training. No change in course length is anticipated.

 

Title

Marine Expeditionary Airfield Equipment

CIN

C-604-2015

Model Manager

NATTC Pensacola

Description

Provides selected Marine Corps personnel with technical instruction in the installation, operation, maintenance, inspection, and field testing procedures of MCEA components and aircraft recovery equipment.

Location

NATTC Pensacola

Length

41 days

RFT date

October 1999

Skill identifier

MOS 7011

TTE/TD

TTE consists of one MOSKITs and one SALKIT. Refer to part IV.A.1 of this NTSP for detailed information.

Prerequisites

None

c. Student Profile

SKILL IDENTIFIER

PREREQUISITE SKILL AND

KNOWLEDGE REQUIREMENTS

MOS 7011

  • None

d. Training Pipelines. No new training pipelines were required to support the MOSLS. No changes are required to the existing course lengths due to the MOSLS.

I. ON-BOARD (IN-SERVICE) TRAINING

1. Proficiency or Other Training Organic to the New Development. NA

2. Personnel Qualification Standards. NA

3. Other On-Board or In-Service Training Packages. Marine Corps on-board training is based on the current series of MCO P3500.12P, Volume VII Training and Readiness Manual. This program is designed to meet Marine Corps, as well as Navy Office of the Chief of Naval Operations Instruction 4790.2G, maintenance training requirements. It is a performance-based, standardized, level-progressive, documentable, training management and evaluation program. It identifies and prioritizes task inventories by MOS through a front-end analysis process that identifies task, skill, and knowledge requirements of each MOS. Maintenance Training Improvement Program questions coupled to Marine Training Management Evaluation Program tasks will help identify training deficiencies that can be addressed with refresher training.

J. LOGISTICS SUPPORT

1. Manufacturer and Contract Numbers. The contract N68335-98-D-0052 for procurement of MOSKITS and SALKITS has been awarded to Metalite Aviation Lighting, a Division of Metalline International LTD, Winster Grove, Great Barr, Birmingham B44 9EJ, United Kingdom.

2. Program Documentation. An Integrated Logistics Support Plan (ILSP), NAWCADLKE I85093002, was revised and approved in May 1997. ORD 464-88-97, published by the Marine Corps Combat Development Command (MCCDC), Quantico, Virginia, was revised and approved on 5 June 1997. The Users Logistics Support Summary (ULSS), NAWCADLKE U85099002, was published on 29 January 1999.

3. Technical Data Plan. Technical manuals associated with MOSLS consist of organizational and intermediate level Maintenance Manuals with Illustrated Parts Breakdown. These manuals along with the Maintenance Index Page and associated Maintenance Requirement Cards will be printed and distributed by NAWCADLKE in fourth quarter FY99. Refer to part IV.B.3 of this NTSP for specific technical data information.

4. Test Sets, Tools, and Test Equipment. Basic metric tools to support the MOSLS are being supplied via a tool kit sent out to each installation. No special test set or test equipment are required to support the MOSLS.

5. Repair Parts. Navy Inventory Control Point (NAVICP) Philadelphia, Pennsylvania provides supply support for the MOSLS. Other Inventory Control Points or Defense Logistics Agencies may be assigned supply support responsibilities by NAVICP for certain assemblies and commodities under their cognizance. A majority of the MOSLS components are currently cataloged through the NATO Supply System. Consumable spares, repairable assemblies, and any parts not already in the NATO Supply System will be added to the NATO inventory.

Interim spare and repair parts that are required to support the MOSLS prior to the estimated Material Support Date of September 2000 are the responsibility of NAWCADLKE.

6. Human Systems Integration. The MOSLS is a non-developmental program; however, every effort will be made to ensure human systems integration factors are considered in the manufacturing process. As a minimum MOSLS includes:

    • Physical measures to preclude interchange of units or components of the same or similar form that are not functionally interchangeable
    • Physical measures to preclude improper mounting of units or components
    • Measures (e.g., coding) to facilitate identification of interchangeable units or components
    • Measures to ensure that identification, orientation, and provisions include cables and connectors
    • Physical measures to facilitate scheduled and unscheduled maintenance

K. SCHEDULES

1. Installation and Delivery Schedules. One MOSLS consists of two MOSKITs and three SALKITs. Since both the MOSKITs and SALKITs are completely self-contained mobile units, no installation is required. One MOSLS was obtained early for the FCTP, and TTE, consisting of one MOSKIT and one SALKIT, is currently at NATTC Pensacola. A total of 12 MOSLS are being procured. In addition, 4 MOSKITs and 4 SALKITs are being procured and used as individual units. The manufacturing schedule is as follows:

 

YEAR

MOSKIT

SALKIT

FY98

1

4

FY99

22

2

FY00

0

24

FY01

5

10

The delivery schedule by activity for the MOSLS is as follows:

ACTIVITY

MOSKIT #1

MOSKIT #2

SALKIT #1

SALKIT #2

SALKIT #3

NATTC Pensacola

May 98

----------

May 98

----------

----------

MWSS-171 Iwakuni, Japan

Feb 99

Jun 99

Oct 99

Apr 00

Feb 01

MWSS-172 Futenma, Okinawa

Mar 99

Jul 99

Nov 99

May 00

Mar 01

MWSS-271 (T) Bogue

Oct 98

Oct 98

Oct 98

Oct 98

Oct 98

MWSS-271 (C) Bogue

Nov 98

Nov 98

Sep 99

Feb 00

Aug 00

MWSS-272 New River

Dec 98

Dec 98

Sep 99

Mar 00

Aug 01

MWSS-273 Beaufort

Apr 99

Aug 99

Jan 00

Jun 00

Jun 01

MWSS-274 Cherry Point

Mar 99

Jul 99

Dec 99

May 00

Apr 01

MWSS-371 Yuma

Feb 99

Jun 99

Nov 99

Apr 00

Mar 01

MWSS-372 Camp Pendleton

May 99

Aug 01

Feb 00

Jul 00

Jul 00

* MWSS-373 Miramar

Apr 99

Aug 99

Dec 99

Jun 00

Apr 01

MWSS-374 Miramar

May 99

Jul 01

Jan 00

Jul 00

Jun 01

MWSS-471 Fort Worth

Aug 01

----------

Oct 01

----------

----------

MWSS-472 Marietta

Sep 01

----------

Oct 01

----------

----------

MWSS-474 Willow Grove

Sep 01

----------

Nov 01

----------

----------

AGSE, 29 Palms

Jan 99

Jan 99

Oct 99

Mar 00

Feb 01

* Note: MWSS-373 is scheduled to relocate to Miramar from El Toro by July 1999.

2. Ready For Operational Use Schedule. The MOSLS is Ready For Operational Use upon delivery.

3. Time Required to Install at Operational Sites. The MOSLS is a fully self-contained, portable system that can be transported by aircraft, ship or truck to the desired operating location and be fully deployed in less than one hour, by not more than five Marines.

4. Foreign Military Sales and Other Source Delivery Schedule. NA

5. Training Device and Technical Training Equipment Delivery Schedule. No TDs are required to support the MOSLS. TTE consisting of one MOSKIT and one SALKIT is currently at NATTC Pensacola. There may be a requirement to upgrade some of the components of the TTE to conform to the latest configuration of system being manufactured.

L. GOVERNMENT FURNISHED EQUIPMENT AND CONTRACTOR FURNISHED EQUIPMENT TRAINING REQUIREMENTS. NA

M. RELATED NTSPs AND OTHER APPLICABLE DOCUMENTS

DOCUMENT

OR NTSP TITLE

DOCUMENT

OR NTSP NUMBER

PDA

CODE

STATUS

Integrated Logistics Support Plan for the Minimum Operating Strip Lighting System

ILSP-I85093002

PMA251

Approved May 97

Operational Requirements Document for the Minimum Operating Strip Lighting System

ORD-464-88-97

MCCDC-C44

Approved Jun 97

The Users Logistics Support Summery

ULSS-U85099002

PMA251

Approved Jan 99



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