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APPROVED

NAVY TRAINING SYSTEM PLAN

FOR THE

HELLFIRE MODULAR MISSILE SYSTEM

N88-NTSP-A-50-8311B/A

MARCH 2000

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

The Hellfire Modular Missile System (HMMS) provides accurate fire on targets acquired and designated by ground observers or airborne laser target designators. The HMMS is intended for use by the United States Navy (USN) H-60 Armed-Helicopter Program (HH-60H and SH-60B), and United States Marine Corps (USMC) AH-1W Helicopters. HMMS Initial Operating Capability (IOC) was attained in June 1986 for the Air-to-Ground Missile (AGM)-114B and third quarter Fiscal Year 95 for the AGM-114K, and AGM-114M will attain IOC October 2000.

The HMMS consists of three configurations; the AGM-114B Hellfire, AGM-114K Hellfire II, and AGM-114M tactical missiles. The HMMS is an anti-armor terminal homing weapon, which uses a shaped charge warhead on the AGM-114B/K versions to defeat individual hardpoint targets with a minimal exposure to enemy fire by the delivery helicopter. The AGM-114M version uses a Blast Fragmentation Warhead (BFW) designed to defeat a general class of targets represented by ships, deck mounted weapon systems, light armored vehicles, and light bunkers by a combination of fragmentation and blast effects. The external configuration of the AGM-114B, AGM-114K, and AGM-114M are the same. The AGM-114K is an enhancement of the original AGM-114B. Enhancements include an Electro-optical Countermeasure hardened target guidance section, a digital autopilot function, an anti-reactive armor warhead, and an Electronic Safe, Arm, Fire Device for the warheads. The AGM-114M is basically an AGM-114K with the forward warhead removed and a BFW inserted as the main warhead. There is also a modified Electronic Safe, Arm, Fire Device.

The HMMS maintenance requirements are allocated to the organizational, intermediate, and depot levels of maintenance as defined in the Naval Ordnance Maintenance Management Program, Office of the Chief of Naval Operations Instruction 8000.(Series). Workload associated with the HMMS does not increase existing manning levels, with the exception of organizational levels. With the advent of forward firing air-to-ground munitions in the Armed-Helicopter Program, Navy personnel in the Aviation Ordnance rating are essential to ensure safe, effective weapons employment from H-60 squadrons. Manpower adjustments for organizational level have been approved and are reflected in the Total Force Manpower Management System and shown in the applicable HH-60H and SH-60B Navy Training System Plans.

The HMMS operator training is provided to Helicopter Pilots, Weapon System Officers, and Air Tactical Officers at the appropriate Fleet Readiness Squadron. Organizational and intermediate level maintenance training for HMMS is taught to USN and USMC ordnance personnel at applicable Naval Maintenance Training Group Detachment (NAMTRAGRU DET) Maintenance Training Unit (MTU), and Fleet Replacement Enlisted Skills Training (FREST) facilities. Specific armament systems maintenance and launcher courses are taught at MTU 1030 Marine Corps Air Station Camp Pendleton, California. The HMMS surface training will be conducted at Fleet Training Center San Diego, California, in support of initial ship's company explosive handling personnel qualification and certification programs.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Page

Executive Summary i

List of Acronyms iii

Preface vi

PART I - TECHNICAL PROGRAM DATA

A. Title-Nomenclature-Program I-1

B. Security Classification I-1

C. Manpower, Personnel, and Training Principals I-1

D. System Description I-2

E. Developmental Test and Operational Test I-2

F. Aircraft and/or Equipment/System/Subsystem Replaced I-2

G. Description of New Development I-2

H. Concepts I-6

I. On-Board (In-Service) Training I-18

J. Logistics Support I-20

K. Schedules I-21

    1. Government Furnished Equipment and Contractor Furnished Equipment

Training Requirements I-22

M. Related NTSPs and Other Applicable Documents I-22

PART II - BILLET AND PERSONNEL REQUIREMENTS II-1

PART III - TRAINING REQUIREMENTS III-1

PART IV - TRAINING LOGISTICS SUPPORT REQUIREMENTS IV-1

PART V - MPT MILESTONES V-1

PART VI - DECISION ITEMS/ACTION REQUIRED VI-1

PART VII - POINTS OF CONTACT VII-1

LIST OF ACRONYMS

Ada

Airborne Data Automation

AGM

Air-to-Ground Missile

AMTCS

Aviation Maintenance Training Continuum System

AO

Aviation Ordnanceman

AOB

Average On Board

ATIR

Annual Training Input Requirement

AUR

All-Up-Round

   

BFW

Blast Fragmentation Warhead

   

CAIMS

Conventional Ammunition Integrated Management System

CATM

Captive Air Training Missile

CBT

Computer-Based Training

CEST

Classroom Explosive System Trainer

CETS

Contractor Engineering and Technical Services

CIN

Course Identification Number

CMC

Commandant of the Marine Corps

CNO

Chief of Naval Operations

CWTPI

Conventional Weapons Training Proficiency Inspection

   

DA

Developing Agency

DATM

Dummy Air Training Missile

DOP

Designated Overhaul Point

DT&E

Developmental Test and Evaluation

DT

Developmental Test

   

ECP

Engineering Change Proposal

EOD

Explosive Ordnance Disposal

EODTEU

Explosive Ordnance Disposal Training and Evaluation Unit

ESAF

Electronic Safe, Arm, Fire

   

FHS

FLIR/Hellfire System

FLIR

Forward Looking Infrared

FREST

Fleet Replacement Enlisted Skills Training

FRS

Fleet Readiness Squadron

FTC

Fleet Training Center

FTG

Fleet Training Group

FY

Fiscal Year

   

GEG

Guidance Electronic Group

GSG

Guidance Section Group

   

HCS

Helicopter Combat Support Special Squadron

HEAT

High Explosive Anti-Tank

HMMS

Hellfire Modular Missile System

HMT

Helicopter Marine Training Squadron

HS

Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron

HSL

Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron Light

   

ILSP

Integrated Logistics Support Plan

IOC

Initial Operational Capability

IR

Infrared

   

LAMPS

Light Airborne Multi-Purpose System

   

MALS

Marine Aviation Logistics Squadron

MATMEP

Maintenance Aviation Training Management Evaluation Program

MCAS

Marine Corps Air Station

MCCDC

Marine Corps Combat Development Command

MOS

Military Occupational Specialty

MTIP

Maintenance Training Improvement Program

MTU

Maintenance Training Unit

   

NA

Not Applicable

NAMTRAGRU DET

Naval Air Maintenance Training Group Detachment

NAS

Naval Air Station

NATEC

Naval Air Technical and Engineering Service Command

NAVAIRSYSCOM

Naval Air Systems Command

NAVPERSCOM

Navy Personnel Command

NAVSCOLEOD

Naval School Explosive Ordnance Disposal

NAVAIRWARCENWPNDIV

Naval Air Warfare Center Weapons Division

NEC

Navy Enlisted Classification

NOBC

Navy Officer Billet Code

NOMMP

Naval Ordnance Maintenance Management Program

NS

Naval Station

NSD

Navy Support Date

NTSP

Navy Training System Plan

NWS

Naval Weapons Station

   

OPNAVINST

Office of the Chief of Naval Operations Instruction

OPO

OPNAV Principal Office

OT

Operational Test

   

PEST

Practical Explosive Ordnance Disposal System Trainer

PMA

Program Manager, Air

PQS

Personnel Qualification Standards

   

RFI

Ready For Issue

RFOU

Ready For Operational Use

RFT

Ready For Training

   

SAD

Safe Arm Device

SIST

Serviceable In-Service Time

   

TA

Training Agency

TBD

To Be Determined

TD

Training Device

TFS

Total Force Structure

TGM

Training Guided Missile

TSA

Training Support Agency

TTE

Technical Training Equipment

TTF

Trident Training Facility

   

USMC

United States Marine Corps

USN

United States Navy

   

VMAT

Marine Attack Training Squadron

   

WFM

Weapons Firing Module

WTU

Weapons Training Unit

PREFACE

This Approved Navy Training System Plan (NTSP) for the Air-to-Ground Missile (AGM)-114B, AGM-114K and AGM-114M Hellfire Modular Missile System (HMMS) was prepared as part of the NTSP update process within guidelines set forth in Navy Training Requirements Documentation Manual OPNAV Publication P-751-1-9-97. This NTSP reflects changes that have occurred since the Hellfire Modular Missile System Draft NTSP, N889-NTSP-A-50-8311B/P, dated January 2000. The major changes to this NTSP consist of:

    • Incorporated changes to the executive summary, maintenance concept, training concept, and technical publications.
    • Updated information on AGM-114M HMMS.
    • Updated points of contacts.

N88-NTSP-A-50-8311B/A

March 2000

PART I - TECHNICAL PROGRAM DATA

A. TITLE-NOMENCLATURE-PROGRAM

1. Nomenclature - Title - Acronym. AGM-114B Hellfire, AGM-114K Hellfire II, and AGM-114M Hellfire Modular Missile System (HMMS)

2. Program Element. 0204162N

B. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION

1. System Characteristics Confidential

2. Capabilities Unclassified

3. Functions Unclassified

C. MANPOWER, PERSONNEL, AND TRAINING PRINCIPALS

OPNAV Principal Official (OPO) Program Sponsor CNO (N880D5)

OPO Resource Sponsor CNO (N880D5)

Marine Corps Program Sponsor CMC (APW-23)

Developing Agency PEO TACAIR (PMA242)

Training Agency CINCLANTFLT

CINCPACFLT

CNET

MCCDC

Training Support Agency NAVAIRSYSCOM (PMA205)

Manpower and Personnel Mission Sponsor CNO (N12)

NAVPERSCOM (PERS-4B, PERS-404)

Director of Naval Training CNO (N7)

Marine Corps Force Structure MCCDC (TFS) (C53250)

D. SYSTEM DESCRIPTION

1. Operational Uses. The HMMS, AGM-114B Hellfire, AGM-114K Hellfire II, and AGM-114M, also referred to in this document individually, were designed primarily for destruction of hardened targets during day or night operations, with sufficient standoff range to permit minimal exposure to enemy fire by the delivery helicopter. The AGM-114B, AGM-114K, and AGM-114M provide accurate fire on targets acquired and designated by ground observers or an airborne laser target designator. The AGM-114B, AGM-114K and AGM-114M are intended for use by the United States Marine Corps (USMC) AH-1W Helicopter and by the United States Navy (USN) H-60 Armed-Helicopter Program (utilizing the HH-60H and SH-60B platforms). The AGM-114B and AGM-114K are cleared for shipboard use, and AGM-114M will be cleared in October 2000.

2. Foreign Military Sales. Sweden, Israel, and numerous other countries have procured, through the United States Army, various versions of the HMMS. Current sales of the latest versions (AGM-114K and AGM-114M) are ongoing, will be addressed in updates of this NTSP.

E. DEVELOPMENTAL TEST AND OPERATIONAL TEST

1. Development Test and Evaluation. The Development Test and Evaluation (DT&E) launch phase of the AGM-114B was conducted from May through September 1984. The DT&E on the AGM-114K was completed in Fiscal Year (FY)93 and FY94. AGM-114M will not require a DT&E because it is the same as the AGM-114K except for the warhead.

2. Operational Test. The Operational Test (OT) for the AGM-114B was conducted from November 1984 through September 1985. The AH-1W Helicopter integration OT and the AGM-114B Missile Follow-On Test and Evaluation was conducted concurrently from December 1985 through June 1986. The Office of the Secretary of Defense waived the OT requirement for the AGM-114K due to the large number of user firings during AGM-114K development. AGM-114M will not require an OT.

F. EQUIPMENT/SYSTEM/SUBSYSTEM REPLACED. The Hellfire Modular Missile System does not replace any existing missiles in the Navy or Marine Corps inventory. Aircraft modifications to incorporate Hellfire capability into the AH-1W, HH-60H, and SH-60B helicopters have been completed.

G. DESCRIPTION OF NEW DEVELOPMENT. The U.S. Army is the executive service for development of the AGM-114 (series) missiles with the Navy and Marine Corps designated as participating services. The Army began development of the Hellfire Missile System in 1974. In January 1978, in order to meet Marine Corps requirements for helicopter fired laser-guided anti-tank missiles, the Department of Defense issued a standardization recommendation that led to development of the AGM-114B. The AGM-114K has completed development and is the follow-on replacement for the AGM-114B. The AGM-114M is currently under development with anticipated deliveries commencing in FY01.

1. Functional Description. The AGM-114B and the AGM-114K are anti-armor, laser-guided, air-to-ground weapons, which use a shaped charge warhead to defeat individual targets with minimal exposure to enemy fire by the delivery helicopter. The AGM-114M version uses a Blast Fragmentation Warhead (BFW) which is designed to defeat a general class of targets represented by ships, deck mounted weapon systems, light armored vehicles and light bunkers by a combination of fragmentation and blast effects. Guidance is provided through automatic terminal homing on laser signals reflected from the laser designated targets. For this document, the Hellfire Modular Missile System consists of three configurations, the AGM-114B, AGM-114K, and AGM-114M as described in paragraph 1.a, 1.b, and 1.c.

The M-272 Guided Missile Launcher was specifically developed and designed to carry and launch the AGM-114B for the AH-1W helicopter. The M-299 Guided Missile Launcher was designed for use by the SH-60B and HH-60H helicopters to carry and launch the AGM-114B, AGM-114K, and AGM-114M.

The Navy uses the CNU-448/E aluminum container to ship both the AGM-114B and AGM-114K All-Up-Rounds (AUR). The container is used to transport repairable AURs to and from the AUR depot and the Designated Overhaul Point (DOP), place Ready for Issue (RFI) AURs in storage, or transport RFI AURs back to the fleet.

a. AGM-114B. The external configuration of the AGM-114B is the same as the AGM-114K and is fully compatible, including the launch platform and support system. Commonality in the configuration of the three missiles allows use of the same shipping containers, handling tools, test fixtures, and launchers. The individual sections of the AGM-114B are described below:

(1) Laser Seeker Section. The laser seeker acquires and tracks targets designated with laser energy by using the energy reflected from the target. The laser seeker section is packaged in two separate units; the seeker head assembly and an electronics assembly. The seeker head assembly consists of a gyro-optics assembly, dome, potted coil assembly, and the interface board, which attaches to the back of the gyro support. The gyro-optics assembly is an inertially stabilized, spinning mass, gimbaled detector assembly made up of three subassemblies: the rotor, the gimbal, and the sensor. The dome is made of injection molded optical graded polycarbonate. A purging operation is performed to remove any moisture within the seeker head by replacing the air that is present with dry nitrogen under positive pressure.

(2) Warhead Section. The warhead, a High Explosive Anti-Tank (HEAT) type, uses a shaped charge and is detonated by an electromechanical fuze. The major components of the warhead are the warhead body, including a center support ring, a liner-explosive-built subassembly, a retaining ring, a main charge pellet, a precision initiation coupler, a waveshaper, and a cover plate. The warhead provides the kill mechanism of a guided missile designed to destroy a tank-type target. The signal to detonate the warhead is provided by a crush switch located in the seeker section.

(3) Fuze. Safing, arming, and detonating functions for the warhead are provided by the M820 fuze, a base detonating electro-mechanical device. The fuze requires the application of electrical power in conjunction with forward acceleration greater than 10 gravitational forces in order to arm.

(4) Guidance Section Group. The Guidance Section Group (GSG) consists of an autopilot electronic assembly, gyros, battery, and a gas accumulator. The GSG receives information from the laser seeker and provides commands to the control section. It also provides missile trajectory control prior to seeker lock-on during the indirect firing mode. The GSG provides electrical and pneumatic power requirements for the missile after launch.

(5) Propulsion Section. The propulsion section, including rocket motor, provides thrust to separate the missile from the launch rail, the acceleration profile necessary to arm the warhead fuze, and the impulse which enables the missile to be launched outside the target's gun defense range with minimum flight time to target. There are three different rocket motors:

    • M120 reduced smoke, used with the AGM-114A. (Army version)
    • M120E1 minimum smoke, which limits the exhaust signature and is used with the AGM-114C. (Army version)
    • M120E2 minimum smoke, which adds a Safe Arm Device (SAD) to meet Navy shipboard safety requirements, used with the AGM-114B and AGM-114K, and will be used with AGM-114M.

(6) Control Section. The control section accepts commands from the GSG and positions control surfaces as required for missile stabilization and control.

b. AGM-114K. The external configuration of the AGM-114K is the same as the AGM-114B and is fully compatible with the basic Hellfire missile system, including the launch platform and support system. Commonality in the configuration of the three missiles allows use of the same shipping containers, handling tools, test fixtures, and launchers. Enhancements in the AGM-114K include an Electro-optical Countermeasure hardened guidance section, digital auto-pilot function, anti-reactive armor forward warhead, and Electronic Safe, Arm, Fire (ESAF) Device for the main and forward warheads. The AGM-114K is externally reprogrammable to accommodate threat changes or performance enhancements.

(1) Forward Warhead Section. The forward warhead has the capability of defeating explosive reactive armor employed on tanks, bunkers, and other hard point targets. State-of-the-art liner technology has been incorporated into the forward warhead.

(2) Main Warhead Section. The main warhead is a shaped charge that has precision initiation timing in tandem with the forward warhead to provide the highest level of penetration. It has the capability of defeating tanks, bunkers, and other point-armored targets.

(3) Guidance Section. The guidance functions in the AGM-114K are Airborne Data Automation (Ada) software controlled. They are reprogrammable to defeat future threats and have a modular design for alternate seeker compatibility. AGM-114K autopilot functions reside in the Guidance Electronic Group (GEG), which is located in the aft part of the main warhead section.

(4) Electronic Safe, Arm, Fire Device. The ESAF Device is a totally electronic warhead SAD, which uses digital circuitry to control exploding foil initiator, slapper-type detonators that are physically in-line with the AGM-114K warhead explosive charges. The ESAF Device consists of a main ESAF module, with an integral Warhead Firing Module (WFM) for the main warhead, connected to the WFM for the forward warhead by a cable. A 26-connector ribbon cable provides all internal electrical power and signal interface between the missile and the main ESAF module through the control interface circuit card assembly.

(5) Propulsion Section. The propulsion section of the AGM-114K is the same as the AGM-114B.

(6) Control Section. The control section is functionally and physically the same as the AGM-114B configuration, however, separate parts define the fins and control section.

c. AGM-114M. The external configuration of the AGM-114M will be the same as the AGM-114B and AGM-114K and is fully compatible with the basic Hellfire system, including the launch platform and support system. Commonality in the configuration of the three missiles allows use of the same shipping containers, handling tools, test fixtures, and launchers. The AGM-114M will be basically an AGM-114K missile with the forward warhead removed, a blast fragmentation main warhead installed in place of the shaped charged warhead, and a modified ESAF. The functions of the various sections guidance, propulsion, and control will be virtually the same. The BFW is designed to defeat a general class of targets represented by ships, deck mounted weapon systems, light armored vehicles and light bunkers by a combination of fragmentation and blast effects.

2. Physical Description. The physical characteristics of each are:

 

AGM-114B

AGM-114K

AGM-114M

Length

64.0 inches

64.0 inches

64.0 inches

Diameter

7.0 inches

7.0 inches

7.0 inches

Wing Span

12.8 inches

12.8 inches

12.8 inches

Center of Gravity

34.34 inches

(aft of the

seeker nose)

34.73 inches

(aft of the

seeker nose)

34.86 inches

(aft of the

guidance section

nose)

Weight

100.0 pounds

100.0 pounds

106.3 pounds

Net Explosive Weight

34.13 pounds

35.2 pounds

TBD

3. New Development Introduction. Fleet introduction for the AGM-114B was granted on the AH-1W Helicopter in June 1986, and AGM-114K fleet introduction was granted for the SH-60B and the HH-60H in November 1994. Fleet introduction for the AGM-114M is planned for FY01.

4. Significant Interfaces. The M-272 Guided Missile Launcher provides the electronic and mechanical interface between the missile and helicopter avionics. The launcher is a four-rail configuration capable of carrying and launching from one to four missiles.

5. New Features, Configurations, or Material. The M-299 Guided Missile Launcher is an improved version of the M-272. The M-299 is part of the AGM-114 (series) Missile System for the HH-60H and SH-60B helicopters. The significant improvements over the M-272 are:

    • Operation with all versions of AGM-114 (series) missiles
    • Reduced system weight and complexity
    • Improved maintainability and configuration
    • Compliance with MIL-STD-1760 interface
    • Reprogrammable software
    • High output power supply

The M-272 and M-299 Guided Missile Launchers are described in Integrated Logistic Support Plan (ILSP) Number ARM-078.

H. CONCEPTS

1. Operational Concept. The AGM-114B and AGM-114K Tactical Missiles are designed and AGM114M will be designed to be launched by the AH-1W, HH-60H, and SH-60B flight crew against targets acquired and designated by ground observers or an airborne laser target designator.

2. Maintenance Concept. Maintenance of the AGM-114B and AGM-114K employed on the AH-1W, HH-60H, and SH-60B Helicopters is accomplished using the basic maintenance philosophy outlined in Office of the Chief of Naval Operations Instruction (OPNAVINST) 4790.2G, and specific weapons maintenance instructions outlined in OPNAVINST 8000. (Series). The AGM-114B and AGM-114K missiles are, and the AGM-114M missiles will be under an organizational to depot maintenance concept with limited intermediate maintenance.

a. Organizational Level. Organizational level maintenance units receive the AGM-114B and AGM-114K as an AUR. Organizational level maintenance is performed by Work Center 230 Navy Aviation Ordnanceman (AO) personnel with Navy Enlisted Classifications (NEC) 8378 for the SH-60B, HH-60H, and SH-60F Helicopters. All SH-60B, HH-60H, and SH-60F AOs who complete D/E-646-0840 receive NEC 8378. NEC 8878 has been deleted as a result of the consolidation the SH-60B, SH-60F, and HH-60H Helicopter training, effective 1 October 1997. Due to the detachment concept of the SH-60B Helicopter community, SH-60B Helicopters are often detached to various smaller vessels (i.e., destroyers and frigates). When assigned to these ships, organizational level maintenance tasks are performed by the Light Airborne Multi Purpose System (LAMPS) squadron detachment's maintenance personnel, which consist of various ratings (including one sea duty AO). Marine Corps personnel with Military Occupational Specialties (MOS) 6511 and 6531 perform organizational level maintenance for the AH-1W. Organizational level maintenance units will receive the AGM-114M as an AUR.

The AN/AWM-92 Aircraft Weapons Circuit Test Set is used at the organizational level to functionally test the aircraft's weapons circuits prior to loading the missile. The AN/AWM-54 Firing Circuit Test Set and W-30 Igniter Adapter are used at the organizational level to perform stray voltage tests on the launcher igniter connector. The AWM-101 Hellfire Missile Test Set and the AN/USQ-131 Memory Loader Verifier Set were developed for use in organizational level maintenance on the Hellfire Modular Missile System and have been delivered to the fleet. Organizational level maintenance is primarily limited to missile inspection, uploading, and downloading, with minimum tasks as follows:

    • Aircraft and weapon system inspections
    • Visually inspect for damage and corrosion
    • Aircraft and weapon system release and control checks
    • Weapon uploading and downloading
    • Weapon arming and dearming
    • On-aircraft weapon test
    • Discrepancy reporting
    • Complying with technical directives
    • Record keeping and reporting

b. Intermediate Level. Hellfire Modular Missile System intermediate level maintenance is performed at Intermediate Maintenance Activities, Weapons Departments by AO personnel with NEC 6801 and Marine Corps personnel with MOS 6541. When SH-60B Helicopters are on detachment and assigned to various smaller vessels (i.e., destroyers and frigates), the LAMPS Ordnance Handling Team performs intermediate level maintenance tasks. This Team consists of various ships' company personnel, such as Torpedomen and Sonar Technicians. Intermediate level maintenance tasks are limited to:

    • Visual inspection for damage and corrosion
    • Performing corrosion control procedures
    • De-canning and canning AUR
    • Ready service inspection
    • Record keeping and reporting
    • Preparing AUR for shipping or storage
    • Delivering AUR to organizational level

c. Depot Level. The AGM-114B and AGM-114K missiles are, and the AGM-114M missiles will be, under an organizational to depot maintenance concept whereby when a missile fails Built-In Test (BIT) it is shipped directly to the DOP for repair. This document uses the terms as described in the OPNAVINST 8000.(Series). Anniston Army Depot, Anniston Alabama, is the depot level AUR maintenance activity for the AGM-114B and AGM-114K Tactical Missiles, and will be for the AGM-114M Tactical Missile. Depot level AUR maintenance tasks include:

    • Visual inspection for damage and corrosion
    • Fault isolation by AUR test to faulty section
    • Repair by replacement of failed sections and external components
    • Performing corrosion control procedures
    • Decanning and canning of AUR
    • Containerizing AUR for storage or loadout
    • Technical directive implementation
    • Re-certifying AUR by retest
    • Record keeping and reporting
    • Complete container repair

The DOP is responsible for maintenance beyond the capabilities of the depot level AUR activities, including major overhaul or complete replacement, and rebuild of sections or subassemblies required to restore defective sections and repairable Shop Replaceable Assemblies to original acceptance standards. DOP maintenance is performed on seeker, control, warhead, propulsion, and guidance section groups by Lockheed Martin Company at a facility located within the Anniston Army Depot, Alabama.

d. Interim Maintenance. The Navy Support Date (NSD) for the AGM-114B was achieved in January 1991. The NSD for the AGM-114K was achieved on 11 January 1996.

e. Life-Cycle Maintenance Plan. The Serviceable-In-Service-Time (SIST) is the length of time the AUR weapons are considered serviceable for use at operational activities. There is no SIST for the AGM-114B, AGM-114K, and AGM-114M missiles and the Service Life of the weapon is indefinite. The M-36E1 and M-36E3 Training Guided Missiles (TGM) have no SIST or Service Life requirements.

3. Manning Concept. The AGM-114B and AGM-114K have, and the AGM-114M will have, no impact on existing manpower requirements at intermediate and depot level activities. Pilot and aircrew manpower is driven by seat factor and crew ratio. Manning for USN and USMC fleet squadrons, Fleet Readiness Squadrons (FRSs), and intermediate maintenance activities is based on the total assigned workload. Skills required to support the AGM-114B and AGM-114K are, and the AGM-114M will be, considered to be within the capability of existing NECs and MOSs.

With the advent of forward firing air-to-ground munitions in the Armed-Helicopter Program, Navy personnel in the AO rating are essential to ensure safe, effective weapons employment from H-60 squadrons. The workload for the SH-60B organizational level has increased. The LAMPS squadrons' AO billets have changed to include one E-6 billet per shore duty activity and six E-5 billets per sea duty activity. HH-60H Helicopter squadrons do not work from a detachment concept; therefore, there is no billet change required. Manpower adjustments have been approved and are reflected in the Total Force Manpower Management System and are shown in the respective HH-60H and SH-60B NTSPs.

4. Training Concept. The training concept for the AGM-114B and AGM-114K is, and for AGM-114M will be, divided into organizational and intermediate level maintenance based on Naval Ordnance Maintenance Management Program (NOMMP), OPNAVINST 8000. (Series). Organizational level training is provided to operator and maintenance personnel. Operator training is provided for HH-60H and SH-60B pilots and AH-1W pilots and Weapons System Officer personnel. Currently, Rapid Deployment training is provided by the Naval Air Technical and Engineering Service Command (NATEC) to HH-60H and SH-60B squadron personnel and is scheduled to be completed in July 1999. Organizational level maintenance training is provided to ordnance personnel in the H-60 community with NEC 8378 and to Marine Corps AH-1W community ordnance personnel with MOSs 6511 and 6531. Intermediate level training is provided to Navy AO personnel with NEC 6801; and Marine Corps Ordnance personnel with MOS 6541. Training for shipboard handlers is provided in LAMPS Aviation Ordnance Handling Course, K-050-2131. Computer-Based Training (CBT) is currently being developed for the HMMS and was delivered to the appropriate follow-on training sites March 1999 for the HH-60H and May 1999 for the SH-60B.

The established training concept for most aviation maintenance training divides "A" School courses into two or more segments called Core and Strand. The "C" School courses are also divided into separate Initial and Career training courses. "A" School Core courses include general knowledge and skills training for the particular rating, while "A" School Strand courses focus on the more specialized training requirements for that rating and a specific aircraft or equipment, based on the student's fleet activity destination. Strand training immediately follows Core training and is part of the "A" School. Upon completion of Core and Strand "A" School, graduates attend the appropriate Initial "C" School for additional specific training. Initial "C" School training is intended for students in paygrades E-4 and below. Career "C" School training is provided for E-5 and above personnel to enhance skills and knowledge within their field.

a. Initial Training. All initial training for the AGM-114B was completed at Naval Air Warfare Center Weapons Division (NAVAIRWARCENWPNDIV) Point Mugu, California. The AGM-114K initial training for HH-60H Helicopters was provided under Engineering Change Proposal (ECP)-1109, and for SH-60B under ECP-1155 for the H-60 Armed-Helicopter Program. Developmental Test (DT) and OT instruction for operators and maintainers was completed under the auspices of Program Manager, Air (PMA)205. The DT and OT instruction for SH-60B Rapid Deployment Aircraft were completed in March 1997, followed by the Fleet introduction in November 1997. The DT and OT instruction for HH-60H were completed in July 1998, with Fleet introduction completed in August and September 1998. The DT and OT instruction for SH-60B Core were completed in August 1998, with Fleet introduction in September-October 1999. No initial training will be required for the AGM-114M.

Title ...................

Hellfire Operational Initial Training

Description .........

This course provides operator training on the Hellfire Missile.

Location .............

As required

Length ................

4 days

RFT date ............

September 1999

TTE/TD .............

M-36E1 TGM/Captive Air Training Missile (CATM) and M-299 Guided Missile Launcher

Prerequisite .........

Orders to AGM-114K OT

Title ...................

Hellfire Maintenance Initial Training

Description .........

This course provides instructor personnel with the knowledge and skills required to teach the theory and use of the Hellfire Missile.

Location .............

As required

Length ................

5 days

RFT date ............

September 1999

TTE/TD .............

M-36E1 TGM/CATM and M-299 Guided Missile Launcher

Prerequisite .........

Must be an instructor that requires this knowledge

Fleet instruction will complete the AGM-114K initial training, and Navy instructors from the fleet will convert the initial training to follow-on training. Follow-on training for the AGM-114K will be incorporated into existing training courses and pipelines for the HH-60H and SH-60B helicopter squadrons in second quarter FY00.

The following initial training for the HH-60H and SH-60B is now being utilized as Rapid Deployment training for squadrons' transitioning to and having Hellfire capability. This training is being instructed at locations as required for the proper transition of aircrew and maintenance personnel.

Title ...................

HH-60H and SH-60B Aircrew Operator Training

Description .........

This course provides a system overview with an introduction to the Forward Looking Infrared (FLIR)/Hellfire System (FHS), Infrared (IR)/Laser theory and safety. System operation includes FLIR navigation mode, FHS designation/attack as well as mission preflight. Operational employment considerations are discussed.

Location .............

As required

Length ................

5 days

RFT date ............

Currently available

TTE/TD .............

M-36E1 TGM/CATM and M-299 Guided Missile Launcher

Prerequisite .........

Navy Officer Billet Code (NOBC) 8539

Title ...................

HH-60H and SH-60B Ordnance Training

Description .........

This course provides an introduction to the FHS, AGM-114K release and control, missile, and support equipment configuration, AGM-114K loading and downloading procedures, Hellfire launcher, and launcher testing and troubleshooting.

Location .............

As required

Length ................

5 days

RFT date ............

Currently available

TTE/TD .............

M-34 Dummy Air Training Missile (DATM), M-36E1 TGM/CATM, and M-299 Guided Missile Launcher

Prerequisite .........

AO 8378

b. Follow-on Training. Follow-on training for the AGM-114B is available as part of courses taught at FRS, Naval Maintenance Training Group Detachment (NAMTRAGRU DET) Maintenance Training Unit (MTU), and Fleet Replacement Enlisted Skills Training (FREST) facilities. The AGM-114B causes no change in student throughput or chargeable student billets. Follow-on training courses have all been modified to include the AGM-114B and are currently on-line.

AGM-114B training for AH-1W Helicopter is conducted at Helicopter Marine Training Squadron (HMT)-303, Marine Corps Air Station (MCAS) Camp Pendleton, California. Marine Corps classes are scheduled 11 times per year for squadron personnel.

AGM-114K updates will be incorporated into the existing classes on an as required basis. Hellfire course curriculum information for the HH-60H courses was delivered to the appropriate FRS, NAMTRAGRU DET MTU, FREST, and Weapons Training Unit (WTU) activities following Fleet Introduction in August-September 1998. SH-60B Hellfire missile Initial Operating Capability (IOC) was completed in August 1998. The SH-60B courses will be updated after the completion of DT and OT testing on the SH-60B and delivery of initial training, which occurred in September-October 1999.

For Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadrons (HS), follow-on Hellfire training has been incorporated into existing aircrew training at HS-10, Naval Air Station (NAS) North Island, California; and the Commander, Helicopter Anti-Submarine Wing, Atlantic WTU, NAS Jacksonville, Florida. Additionally, the Navy offers instruction for squadron AOs to teach non-ordnance squadron personnel.

For Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadrons Light (HSL), follow-on Hellfire training will be incorporated into the existing aircrew training at HSL-40, Naval Station (NS) Mayport, Florida; and HSL-41, NAS North Island.

For Naval Reserve Helicopter Combat Support Squadrons (HCS)-4 and HCS-5, a segmented Hellfire training curriculum has been delivered.

(1) Operator Training. Pilots are trained at the appropriate FRS for specific aircraft operation. Operator skills in tactics and ordnance delivery are further enhanced through on-board proficiency training. Training Devices (TDs) required for follow-on and proficiency operator training include the TGM/CATM.

    • M-36E1 Training Guided Missile. The M-36E1 TGM is an inert missile and training round with mass properties and external configurations representative of the AGM-114B and AGM-114K Tactical Missiles. It provides realistic captive flight simulations for training flight crews. The United States Army designated the M-36E1 as the TGM; however, it is also known as the CATM. For clarity in this document, the M-36E1 will be referred to as the TGM/CATM.

The following table lists the applicable operator training courses. The AGM-114B source material has been incorporated in these courses with minimal impact. The AGM-114B, AGM-114K, and AGM-114M will require no change in student throughput or chargeable student billets, and, therefore, these courses will not appear in Parts II and III.

 

COURSE NUMBER

 

COURSE TITLE

AGM-114B RFT

AGM-114K RFT

* D/E-2C-0804

SH-60F CAT IV Utility Pilot Aircrew System Familiarization

On line

Oct 99

R-050-6201

HH-60H Aircrew System/Fundamental

On line

Oct 99

R-050-6203

HH-60H Aircrewman Weapons Tactics (Advanced)

On line

Oct 99

D/E-2C-2501

SH-60B Category I Fleet Replacement Pilot

On line

Oct 99

D/E-2C-2502

SH-60B Category II Fleet Replacement Pilot

On line

Oct 99

D/E-2C-2503

SH-60B Category III Fleet Replacement Pilot

On line

Oct 99

D/E-2C-2504

SH-60B Category IV Fleet Replacement Pilot

On line

Oct 99

D/E-2C-2506

SH-60B Fleet Replacement Squadron Instructor Training

On line

Oct 99

D/E-050-2501

SH-60B Fleet Replacement Light Airborne Multi Purpose System (LAMPS) MK III Aircrew Training Category I

On line

Oct 99

D/E-050-2502

SH-60B Fleet Replacement Aircrew Training Category II

On line

Oct 99

D/E-050-2505

SH-60B Fleet Replacement Aircrew Instructor Under Training

On line

Oct 99

D/E-050-2506

SH-60B Fleet Replacement Aircrew Category V

On line

Oct 99

None USMC

AH-IW Pilot Basic

On line

NA

None USMC

AH-1W Pilot Transition

On line

NA

None USMC

AH-IW Pilot Conversion

On line

NA

None USMC

AH-1W Pilot Refresher

On line

NA

None USMC

AH-1W Modified Refresher

On line

NA

** A-4H-0111

Surface Warfare Officer Prospective Commanding Officer

On line

Oct 99

** A-4H-0112

Surface Warfare Officer Prospective Executive Officer

On line

Oct 99

** A-4H-0107

Surface Warfare Officer Department Head

On line

Oct 99

** A-4H-0118

Surface Warfare Officer Division Officer

On line

Oct 99

** K-2G-0033

Tactical Action Officer

On line

Oct 99

** A-493-0038

Laser System Safety Officer (Category 1)

On line

Oct 99

** A-493-0067

Laser System Safety Officer (Category 2)

On line

Oct 99

** C-602-3770

Laser Safety Fundamentals

On line

Oct 99

* HH-60H Pilots also receive their training through course D/E-2C-0804.

** The courses listed will be impacted in only a nominal way.

(2) Organizational Maintenance. Organizational level maintenance personnel are trained at the appropriate MTU or FREST for specific aircraft maintenance. Weapon loading skills are further enhanced through on-board proficiency training. TDs required for follow-on and proficiency training include the TGM/CATM (described above) and the DATM.

    • M-34 Dummy Air Training Missile. The M-34 DATM is an inert missile with mass properties and an external configuration representative of the AGM-114B, AGM-114K, and AGM-114M missiles. It is a training device to facilitate instruction and familiarization for transporting, handling, loading, and visual inspection procedures.

The Hellfire Modular Missile System is taught in Aviation Ordnanceman Common Core Class A1 school, and in the following organizational level maintenance training courses. The Hellfire Modular Missile System source material has been incorporated in these courses with minimal impact. It causes no change in student throughput or chargeable student billets, and therefore, these courses will not appear in Parts II and III.

COURSE NUMBER

 

COURSE TITLE

AGM-114B RFT

AGM-114K RFT

TRACK NUMBER

C-646-3346

AH-1 Navy Armament and Control Delivery System (NARCADS) Intermediate Maintenance

On line

Oct 99

M-602-5811

C-198-9351

AH-1W Tow/Hellfire Control and Display System Integrated Organizational Maintenance

On line

Oct 99

M-102-2024

C-646-9361

H-1 Armament Systems Maintenance

On line

Oct 99

NA

C-646-9407

SH-60 Armament and Related Organizational Level Maintenance

On line

Oct 99

D/E-646-0840

C-646-9408

SH-60F Conventional Weapons Loading

On line

Oct 99

NA. Stand Alone Course

C-646-9409

SH-60B Conventional Weapons Release and Control and Weapons Loading/Downloading

On line

Oct 99

NA, Stand Alone Course

C-646-9412

* See Note

SH-60 Conventional Weapons Release and Control and Weapons Loading/Downloading

TBD *

TBD *

D/E 646-0840

E-646-0842

SH-60F/HH60H Conventional Weapons Loading

On line

Oct 99

NA

K-050-2131

LAMPS Aviation Ordnance Handling

On line

Oct 99

NA

* Note: This course will combine C-646-9408 and C-646-9409 to produce a generic H-60 AO, who can be assigned to any type SH-60 squadron. Formal delivery and availability of this training is dependent upon update of existing SH-60 Weapons Loading Manuals.

(3) Intermediate Maintenance. Intermediate maintenance training is available for Navy and Marine Corps Aviation Ordnance personnel through the appropriate NAMTRAGRU DET MTU, Fleet Training Center (FTC), and FREST activity. The Fleet Training Center (FTC) San Diego, California, has been identified as the course model manager for Hellfire capable frigate type ship's company handling and storage training. Subsequently, LAMPS Aviation Ordnance Handling Course K-050-2131 has been identified for incorporation of Hellfire Tactical Missile shipboard handling and storage training. The TD required for intermediate maintenance training is the DATM.

The following courses have been updated to include AGM-114B and AGM-114K data:

Title ...................

Air Launched Guided Missiles Intermediate Maintenance

CIN ....................

C-122-3111 (part of D/E-646-7007)

Model Manager...

MTU 4030 NAMTRAGRU DET Norfolk, Virginia

Description ...

This course provides ordnance personnel with knowledge of the Sparrow, Sidewinder, Phoenix, Sidearm, Maverick, Harpoon, Standoff Land Attack Missile, High-Speed Anti-Radiation Missile, Walleye, Tactical Air-Launched Decoy, and Air Nitrogen Purifier Units.

Location ............

MTU 4030 NAMTRAGRU DET, Mayport

MTU 4032 NAMTRAGRU DET, Norfolk

MTU 4033 NAMTRAGRU DET, North Island

MTU 4035 NAMTRAGRU DET, Whidbey Island, Washington

Length ................

12 days

RFT date ............

Currently available

Skill identifier .....

AO 6801 awarded upon completion of track D/E-646-7007

TTE/TD .............

M-34 DATM

Prerequisite .........

C-646-2011, Aviation Ordnanceman Common Core Class A1 C-646-2012, Aviation Ordnanceman Weapons Department Strand Class A1

Title ...................

Aviation Ordnance Intermediate Maintenance Technician

CIN ....................

C-646-3105 (part of M-646-7026)

Model Manager ..

NAMTRAGRU DET 4034, Marine Attack Training Squadron (VMAT)-203 FREST, MCAS Cherry Point

Description .........

This course provides ordnance personnel with knowledge required by USMC personnel working on ordnance/armament in the Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance Department environment.

Location .............

VMAT-203 FREST, MCAS Cherry Point

Length ................

73 days

RFT date ............

Currently available

Skill identifier .....

MOS 6541 awarded upon completion of track M-646-7026

TTE/TD .............

M-34 DATM

Prerequisite .........

C-646-2011, Aviation Ordnanceman Common Core Class A1

C-646-2012, Aviation Ordnanceman Airwing Strand Class A1

(4) Depot Level Training. Hellfire Modular Missile System depot level training was designed for personnel assigned to the DOP and consisted of advanced intermediate level maintenance and depot level maintenance courses. The prime contractor of the AGM-114B and AGM-114K taught these courses.

(5) Explosive Ordnance Disposal Training. Explosive Ordnance Disposal Training is conducted at Naval Explosive Ordnance Disposal School Eglin Air Force Base (AFB), Florida. The TDs required for EOD training are the PEST and the Classroom Explosive System Trainer (CEST):

    • Practical Explosive Ordnance Disposal System Trainer. The PEST is a full-scale model fabricated from actual hardware, having approximately the same weight and center of gravity as the tactical missile. The PEST is used for teaching Rendering Safe Procedure.
    • Classroom Explosive System Trainer. The CEST is an inert cutaway model displaying locations and types of explosive and hazardous materials, initiators, igniters, and fuze.

The following table lists the applicable EOD training courses. The Hellfire Modular Missile System source material will be incorporated in these courses with minimal impact. This will cause no change in student throughput or chargeable student billets

EXPLOSIVE ORDNANCE DISPOSAL COURSES

COURSE NUMBER

COURSE TITLE

RFT DATE

A-431-0011

Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) Phase II (Navy)

On-line

A-431-0012

Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) Phase II

On-line

G-431-0001

EOD Pre-deployment Team Training

On-line

c. Student Profiles

SKILL IDENTIFIER

PREREQUISITE SKILL AND KNOWLEDGE REQUIREMENTS

AO 6801

C-646-2011, Aviation Ordnanceman Common Core Class A1

C-646-2013, Aviation Ordnanceman Weapons Department Strand Class A1

MOS 6541

C-646-2011, Aviation Ordnanceman Common Core Class A1

C-646-2012, Aviation Ordnanceman Airwing Strand Class A1

d. Training Pipelines. The following training tracks apply and are available in OPNAV Aviation Training Management System (OATMS):

TRACK NUMBER

TRACK TITLE

D/E-646-7007

General Shipboard/NAS Weapons Department Aviation Ordnance Maintenance

M-646-7026

Aviation Ordnance Technician Intermediate Maintenance

I. ON-BOARD (IN-SERVICE) TRAINING

1. Proficiency or Other Training Organic to the New Development. Pilot, Weapons System Operator, and Aviation Tactical Officer weapons proficiency training is accomplished in three steps: Academic, Simulator, and Captive Carry:

    • Academic. Aircrews receive academic training within their respective squadrons from the weapon subject matter expert. Selected squadron aircrew receive additional classroom weapon training from HS-1 NAS Jacksonville and HS-10 NAS North Island.
    • Simulator. The appropriate weapon tactical trainer is set up by the squadron for the aircrew to gain required proficiency prior to captive carry of the selected weapons.
    • Captive Carry. The selected training weapons are loaded on an aircraft at which time the aircrew will gain proficiency and final qualification on the selected weapons.

a. Maintenance Training Improvement Program. The Maintenance Training Improvement Program (MTIP) is used to establish an effective and efficient training system responsive to fleet training requirements. MTIP is a training management tool that, through diagnostic testing, identifies individual training deficiencies at the organizational and intermediate levels of maintenance. MTIP is the comprehensive testing of one's knowledge. It consists of a bank of test questions managed through automated data processing. The Deputy Chief of Staff for Training assisted in development of MTIP by providing those question banks (software) already developed by the Navy. MTIP was implemented per OPNAVINST 4790.2 series. MTIP allows increased effectiveness in the application of training resources through identification of skills and knowledge deficiencies at the activity, work center, or individual technician level. Refresher training is concentrated where needed to improve identified skill and knowledge shortfalls. MTIP will be replaced by the Aviation Maintenance Training Continuum System (AMTCS). Current planning is for AMTCS to begin full implementation for fleet deployment on 01 October 2000.

COMNAVAIRPAC has discontinued using MTIP. They are currently using maintenance data products as a source to determine maintenance training deficiencies until AMTCS is implemented.

b. Aviation Maintenance Training Continuum System. AMTCS will provide career path training to the Sailor or Marine from their initial service entry to the end of their military career. AMTCS is planned to be an integrated system that will satisfy the training and administrative requirements of both the individual and the organization. The benefits will be manifested in the increased effectiveness of the technicians and the increased efficiencies of the management of the training business process. By capitalizing on technological advances and integrating systems and processes where appropriate, the right amount of training can be provided at the right time, thus meeting the Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) mandated "just-in-time" training approach.

Technology investments enable the development of several state-of-the-art training and administrative tools: Computer-Based Training (CBT) for the technicians in the Fleet in the form of ICW with Computer Managed Instruction (CMI) and Computer Aided Instruction (CAI) for the schoolhouse.

Included in the AMTCS development effort is the Aviation Maintenance Training Continuum System - Software Module (ASM) which provides testing [Test and Evaluation (TEV)], recording [Electronic Training Jacket (ETJ)], and a Feedback system. The core functionality of these AMTCS tools are based and designed around the actual maintenance-related tasks the technicians perform, and the tasks are stored and maintained in a Master Task List (MTL) data bank. These tools are procured and fielded with appropriate COTS hardware and software, i.e. Fleet Training Devices (FTD) - Laptops, PCs, Electronic Classrooms (ECR), Learning Resource Centers (LRC), operating software, and network software and hardware.

Upon receipt of direction from OPNAV (N889H), AMTCS is to be implemented and the new tools integrated into the daily training environment of all participating aviation activities and supporting elements. AMTCS will serve as the standard training system for aviation maintenance training within the Navy and Marine Corps, and is planned to supersede the existing MTIP and Maintenance Training Management and Evaluation Program (MATMEP) programs.

2. Personnel Qualification Standards. OPNAVINST 8023.2C outlines requirements for Personnel Qualification Standard (PQS), NAVEDTRA 43202 series. All personnel who handle Non-nuclear Explosive Ordnance (Shipboard Handling and Stowage) require this PQS.

3. Other On-Board or Inservice Training Packages. The Conventional Weapons Technical Proficiency Inspection (CWTPI) is a graded inspection administered every 24 months by Commander Helicopter Squadron Wings Atlantic NAS Jacksonville, Florida, and Commander Helicopter Squadron Wings Pacific NAS North Island. A five-day training course is provided by MTU 1066 NAMTRAGRU DET NS Mayport and MTU 1067 NAMTRAGRU DET NAS North Island prior to the actual CWTPI. The inspection evaluates a squadron's ability to correctly wire-check , upload and download conventional ordnance. The CWTPI determines the need for further conventional weapons load training of squadron AO personnel and weapons loading team members.

Marine Corps on-board training is based on the current series of Marine Corps Order (MCO) P4790.12, Individual Training Standards System MATMEP. This program is designed to meet Marine Corps, as well as Navy OPNAVINST 4790.2G, maintenance training requirements. It is a performance-based, standardized, level-progressive, documentable, training management and evaluation program. It identifies and prioritizes task inventories by MOS through a front-end analysis process that identifies task, skill, and knowledge requirements of each MOS. MTIP questions coupled to MATMEP tasks will help identify training deficiencies that can be addressed with remedial training.

Headquarters, Marine Corps, schedules the USMC activities yearly for Marine Corps Combat Readiness Evaluation. Marine Corps activities participate in war exercises and are evaluated. Training is an on-going Marine Corps evolution that culminates with the Combat Readiness Evaluation. The evaluation determines the need for further conventional weapons load training of squadron personnel.

The United States Navy Explosive Safety Policies, Requirements, and Procedures (Department of the Navy Explosives Safety Policy Manual) OPNAVINST 8023.2 (Series), promulgates the Explosives Handling Personnel Qualification and Certification program. The Explosives Handling Personnel Qualification and Certification program is designed to ensure that all Navy, Marine Corps, and civilians required to handle explosives or explosive devices are fully trained and qualified to perform all functions and task safety

J. LOGISTICS SUPPORT

1. Manufacturers. Approval for full-scale production of the Hellfire Tactical Missiles was granted in 1986, and production of the AGM-114B is complete. All deliveries were made on a dual source contract with Rockwell International, Tactical Systems Division, Duluth, Georgia, and Hellfire Missile Systems Limited Liability Company, Orlando, Florida. The AGM-114K missile is in production and is the follow-on replacement for the AGM-114B. Approval for full-scale production has been granted on sole-source procurement from Martin Marietta Missile Systems, Orlando, Florida. First deliveries began in November 1994.

CONTRACT NUMBER

MANUFACTURER

ADDRESS

DAAA01-90-C-0323

Lockheed Martin Inc.

Lockheed Martin, Inc.

5600 West Sandlake Road

Orlando, FL 32819-8907

2. Program Documentation. The ILSP, Hellfire Modular Missile System AGM-114B and AGM-114K (MS-067 Revision C of August 1994), was approved and distributed in 1994.

3. Technical Data Plan. Applicable information from existing Army technical manuals was used as source data for development of Navy technical manuals. Technical manuals and source data manuals for the Navy are listed in part IV.B.3.

4. Special Test Sets, Tools, and Test Equipment. The AN/AWM-92 or the AN/AWM-101 Release and Control Set is required for organizational level training equipment.

5. Repair Parts. Supply support of Navy peculiar parts for the missile is provided through the Ships Parts Control Center, Mechanicsburg, Pennsylvania. Principal item spares procured are through United States Army Missile Command and are stocked at the DOP. Supply support for the launcher is available through the Naval Inventory Control Point.

6. Contractor Engineering and Technical Services. Rockwell International provided Contractor Engineering and Technical Services (CETS) during the transition period. CETS included two persons, one at former Naval Weapons Station (NWS) Seal Beach, California, and one at former NWS Yorktown, Virginia, and was conducted during 1987.

7. Human Systems Integration. Not Applicable (NA)

K. SCHEDULES

1. Schedule of Events

a. Installation/Delivery Schedule for the Hellfire Modular Missile System. Delivery of the AGM-114B is complete. Fleet release of the AGM-114K began during third quarter FY96. The H-60 Armed-Helicopter Program (Phase II) began fleet installation of the Hellfire Modular Missile System on HH-60H helicopters in March 1999 after completing DT and OT under ECP-1109. Installation of the Hellfire Modular Missile System on SH-60B Helicopters occurred in late FY99 as part of Phase III of the H-60 Armed-Helicopter Program. The AGM-144M deliveries will begin in March 2000.

b. Ready for Operational Use. The Ready for Operational Use (RFOU) date for the AGM-114B was August 1986. The AGM-114K RFOU date was fourth quarter FY97. The RFOU date for AGM-114M is March 2000.

c. Time Require to Install at Operational Sites. NA

d. Foreign Military Sales. Sweden, Israel, and numerous other countries have procured, through the United States Army, various versions of the HMMS. Current sales of the latest versions (AGM-114K and AGM-114M) are ongoing, will be addressed in updates of this NTSP.

e. Training Device and Technical Training Equipment Delivery Schedule

(1) Practical Explosive Ordnance Disposal System Trainer. Three Hellfire PEST trainers were transferred from the U.S. Army to Naval Surface Warfare Center Indian Head in May 1986.

(2) Training Device and Delivery Schedule. Originally, forty-five M-36E1 TGM/CATMs were delivered to the USMC in support of AH-1W training as part of the AGM-114B procurement. Six M-36E1s were procured under ECP-1109, and they are allocated to support the HH-60H Hellfire Integration Program. Ten additional assets were procured by the Program Executive Office, Tactical Aircraft (PEO(T)) PMA242 to support an inventory increase for the Marine Corps for support of AH-1W AGM-114B training. After the completion of DT and OT the six M-36E1 TGM/CATM procured under ECP-1109 were distributed to the appropriate training activities by the Assistant Program Manager for Logistics for the Hellfire Modular Missile System. During Phase III of the H-60 Armed-Helicopter Program, it will be necessary to procure additional assets to support SH-60B Hellfire missile training. Element IV.A.2 of this NTSP contains information on locations of Training Devices. Current asset status and location can be obtained from the Conventional Ammunition Integrated Management System (CAIMS).

L. GOVERNMENT FURNISHED EQUIPMENT AND CONTRACTOR FURNISHED EQUIPMENT TRAINING REQUIREMENTS. NA

 

 

 

M. RELATED NTSPs AND OTHER APPLICABLE DOCUMENTS

DOCUMENT

OR NTSP TITLE

DOCUMENT

OR NTSP NUMBER

PDA

CODE

STATUS

Hellfire ILSP

MS-067

AIR-290

Approved

12 November 1982

Rev. C, August 1994

Hellfire Phased Support Plan

MS-067

AIR 3.1.1

Approved

May 1991

Rev. A, April 1996

M272 Launcher Operational Logistics Support Plan

ARM-078

AIR 3.1.1

Approved

October 1988

M272 Launcher ILSP

ARM-078

AIR 3.1.1

Approved

February 1984

Rev. A, January 1986

AH-lW Aircraft NTSP

A-50-8520D/A

PMA276

Approved

March 1996

SH-60B LAMPS MK-III Part B Aircraft Subsystems NTSP

A-50-7702D/P

PMA299

Approved

November 1994

HH-60H Combat SAR Special Warfare NTSP

A-50-8714B/A

PMA299

Approved

December 1993



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