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NAVY TRAINING SYSTEM PLAN

FOR THE

GBU-24 SERIES

(PAVEWAY)

LOW LEVEL LASER GUIDED BOMB

HARD TARGET PENETRATOR

N78-NTSP-A-50-0106/D

MARCH 2001

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

This Navy Training System Plan (NTSP) has been developed to identify the life cycle Manpower, Personnel, and Training (MPT) requirements associated with the Guided Bomb Unit (GBU)-24 Series Low Level Laser Guided Bomb (LLLGB), Hard Target Penetrator (HTP). No previous NTSP exists for the GBU-24 Series LLLGB, HTP.

The GBU-24B/B LLLGB, HTP, and by extension, the GBU-24E/B, are an evolution of the United States Air Force (USAF) developed PAVEWAY I and II Laser-Guided Weapon Systems. The GBU-24E/B is an upgraded follow-on to the previously developed GBU-24B/B LLLGB, HTP which is now in Weapon System Acquisition Process III (Production, Development, and Operational Support). The GBU-24E/B, currently in Phase II (Engineering and Manufacturing Development), will eventually replace the GBU-24B/B. For the purposes of this document, except for specific design or other noted differences, the information provided will apply to both the GBU-24B/B and the GBU-24E/B versions of the weapon.

Operations in the Persian Gulf during Operation Desert Storm demonstrated that the Navy had limited capability to destroy buried or surface-hardened targets such as command and control bunkers, aircraft revetments, and shelters, with weapons employed from tactical aircraft. Based upon this need and the availability of the proven USAF 2,000 pound class GBU-24A/B laser-guided PAVEWAY III, in 1991 the Assistant Secretary of the Navy for Research, Development, and Acquisition authorized the procurement, modification, and qualification of the GBU-24A/B for Navy use. This resulted in the GBU-24B/B HTP weapon system, which was capable of overcoming the deficiencies demonstrated during Desert Storm.

The GBU-24 B/B provides significant capabilities, but a requirement to field an "Enhanced" GBU-24 was established by Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) (N780) in June 1997. After review of the program Plan of Action and Milestones (POA&M), CNO authorized the proposed modification, qualification and procurement of 500 GBU-24E/B weapons.

The GBU-24 Series maintenance concept is based on an overall objective to ensure that sufficient tactical weapons are available to fulfill commitments of operational activities and to restore unserviceable units to serviceable condition with minimal downtime. Maintenance requirements are allocated to the organizational, intermediate, and depot levels of maintenance as defined in the Naval Ordnance Maintenance Management Program (NOMMP), Office of the Chief of Naval Operations Instruction (OPNAVINST) 8000.16 (series). Workload associated with the GBU-24 system does not increase manning levels, and no additional manpower requirements are associated with introducing the system.

The GBU-24 Series training concept is to provide Initial and Follow-on training for maintenance and operator personnel. This training is divided into organizational (O) and intermediate (I) level maintenance training based on OPNAVINST 8000.16. Depot (D) level maintenance and any D-level training required is accomplished by the USAF. Operator training is provided to aviators at the Strike Fighter Weapons Schools (SFWS) and the appropriate Fleet Readiness Squadrons (FRS). Platform weapons school organizational level training is provided to F-14 and F/A-18 maintenance personnel at the appropriate Naval Air Maintenance Training Group (NAMTRAGRU) Maintenance Training Unit (MTU) or Detachment and Fleet Replacement Enlisted Skills Training (FREST) activity. Weapons loading training is conducted at the appropriate aircraft loading school. Intermediate level (I-level) maintenance personnel are trained at the appropriate MTU or Detachment.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Page

Executive Summary i

List of Acronyms iv

Preface viii

PART I - TECHNICAL PROGRAM DATA

A. Title-Nomenclature-Program I-1

B. Security Classification I-1

C. Manpower, Personnel, and Training Principals I-1

D. System Description I-2

E. Developmental Test and Operational Test I-2

F. Aircraft and/or Equipment/System/Subsystem Replaced I-3

G. Description of New Development I-3

H. Concepts I-7

I. On Board (In-Service) Training I-17

J. Logistics Support I-20

K. Schedules I-21

L. Government Furnished Equipment and Contractor Furnished Equipment

Training Requirements I-22

M. Related NTSPs and Other Applicable Documents I-22

PART II - BILLET AND PERSONNEL REQUIREMENTS II-1

PART III - TRAINING REQUIREMENTS III-1

PART IV - TRAINING LOGISTICS SUPPORT REQUIREMENTS IV-1

PART V - MPT MILESTONES V-1

PART VI - DECISION ITEMS/ACTION REQUIRED VI-1

PART VII - POINTS OF CONTACT VII-1

LIST OF ACRONYMS
ADG Adapter Group
AFB Air Force Base
AFG Airfoil Group
AIMD Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance Department
AMTCS Aviation Maintenance Training Continuum System
AO Aviation Ordnanceman
ASM Aviation Maintenance Training Continuum System - Software Module
BCM Capability of Maintenance
BFD Battery Firing Device
BIT Built-In Test
BUPERS Bureau of Personnel
CAI Computer Aided Instruction
CBT Computer-Based Training
CEST Classroom Explosive Ordnance Disposal System Trainer
CFY Current Fiscal Year
CINCLANTFLT Commander In Chief, Atlantic Fleet
CINCPACFLT Commander In Chief, Pacific Fleet
CMI Computer Managed Instruction
CNET Chief of Naval Education and Training
CNO Chief of Naval Operations
COMNAVAIRESFOR Commander, Naval Air Reserve Forces
COMNAVAIRLANT Commander, Naval Air Force, Atlantic Fleet
COMNAVAIRPAC Commander, Naval Air Force, Pacific Fleet
COTS Commercial Off-the-Shelf
CTP Critical Technical Parameters
CV Aircraft Carrier
CVN Aircraft Carrier Nuclear
CWTPI Conventional Weapon Technical Proficiency Inspection
D-Level Depot Level
DT&E Developmental Test and Evaluation
DTM Data Transfer Module
ECR Electronic Classrooms
EOD Explosive Ordnance Disposal
EODTEUs EOD Technical Evaluation Units
ETJ Electronic Training Jacket
FASO Fleet Aviation Specialized Training Group
FMS Foreign Military Sales
FOT&E Follow-on Operational Test and Evaluation
FREST Fleet Readiness Enlisted Skills Training
FRS Fleet Readiness Squadron
FTD Fleet Training Devices
FY Fiscal Year
g g-force
GBU Guided Bomb Unit
GCU Guidance Control Unit
GEU Guidance Electronics Unit
GPS Global Positioning System
HARDMAN Hardware/Manpower
HTP Hard Target Penetrator
I-Level Intermediate Level
ICW Interactive Courseware
ILSP Integrated Logistics Support Plan
IMU Inertial Measurement Unit
INS Inertial Navigation System
IOC Initial Operating Capability
IOT&E Initial Operational Test and Evaluation
LDT Load Drill Trainer
LLLGB Low Level Laser Guided Bomb
LRC Learning Resource Centers
MALS Marine Aviation Logistics Squadron
MATMEP Marine Aviation Training Management Evaluation Program
MTMEP Maintenance Training Management and Evaluation Program
MCCDC Marine Corps Combat Development Command
MCO Marine Corps Order
MIL-STD Military-Standard
MOS Military Occupational Specialty
MOTT Mobile Ordnance Training Team
MPT Manpower, Personnel, and Training
MTIP Maintenance Training Improvement Program
MT Mission Trainer
MTL Master Task List
MTU Maintenance Training Unit
NA Not Applicable
NAB Naval Amphibious Base
NAMTRAGRU Naval Air Maintenance Training Group
NAMTRAGRUDET Naval Air Maintenance Training Group Detachment
NAS Naval Air Station
NAVAIRSYSCOM Naval Air Systems Command
NAVPERSCOM Navy Personnel Command
NAVSCOLEOD Navy Explosive Ordnance Disposal School
NAVSURFWARCEN Naval Surface Warfare Center
NAWCWD Naval Air Warfare Center, Weapons Division
NEC Navy Enlisted Classification
NOMMP Naval Ordnance Maintenance Management Program
NS Naval Station
NSAWC Naval Strike and Air Warfare Center
NTSP Navy Training System Plan
NWS Naval Weapons Station
OATMS OPNAV Aviation Training Management System
OFP Operational Flight Program
OFT Operational Flight Trainer
O-Level Organizational Level
OPEVAL Operational Evaluation
OPNAV Office of the Chief of Naval Operations
OPNAVINST Office of the Chief of Naval Operations Instruction
OPO OPNAV Principal Official
OPTEVFOR Operational Test and Evaluation Force
PC Personal Computer
PEST Practical Explosive Ordnance Disposal System Trainer
PFY Previous Fiscal Year
PMA Program Manager, Air
POA&M Plan of Action and Milestones
PTT Part Task Trainer
RFOU Ready For Operational Use
RIO Radar Intercept Officer
RSC Raytheon Systems Company
SFTI Strike Fighter Tactics Instructor
SFTP Strike Fighter Training Program
SFTS Strike Fighter Training System
SFWS Strike Fighter Weapons School
SFWT Strike Fighter Weapons and Tactics
T/M/S Type/Model/Series
TBD To Be Determined
TD Training Device
TEV Test and Evaluation
TMCR Technical Manual Contract Requirements
TD/TTE Training Devices and Technical Training Equipment
UIC Unit Identification Code
USAF United States Air Force
USMC United States Marine Corps
USN United States Navy
WSMR White Sands Missile Range
WSO Weapons and Sensor Operator
WST Weapon System Trainer

PREFACE

This Navy Training System Plan (NTSP) for the GBU-24 Series Low Level Laser Guided Bomb Hard Target Penetrator has been prepared within the guidelines set forth in Office of the Chief of Naval Operations Instruction (OPNAVINST) 1500.76.

N78-NTSP-A-50-0106/D

March 2001

PART I - TECHNICAL PROGRAM DATA

A. NOMENCLATURE-TITLE-PROGRAM

1. Nomenclature-Title-Acronym. GBU-24 Series Low Level Laser Guided Bomb, Hard Target Penetrator (LLLGB, HTP).

2. Program Element. 0205601N

B. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION

1. System Characteristics. Unclassified.

2. Capabilities. Unclassified.

3. Functions. Unclassified.

C. MANPOWER, PERSONNEL, AND TRAINING PRINCIPALS

OPNAV Principal Official (OPO) Program Sponsor CNO (N780D)

OPO Resource Sponsor CNO (N780D)

Developing Agency NAVAIRSYSCOM (PMA 201)

Training Agency CINCLANTFLT

CINCPACFLT

COMNAVAIRESFOR

CNET

MCCDC

Training Support Agency NAVAIRSYSCOM (PMA205)

Manpower and Personnel Mission Sponsor CNO (N12)

NAVPERSCOM (PERS-4, PERS-404)

Director of Naval Training CNO (N7)

Commander, Reserve Program Manager COMNAVAIRESFOR

Marine Corps Combat Development Command

Manpower Management TFS Division

D. SYSTEM DESCRIPTION

1. Operational Uses. The GBU-24 Series LLLGB, HTP is a weapon which has a laser guidance package attached to a penetrator warhead (Paveway III electronics and mechanical assemblies added to the nose and tail of the BLU-109 bomb body). It is carried and launched from F-14B/D and F/A-18C/D/E/F (hereafter referred to as F-14 or F/A-18) aircraft and is designed for use when attacking hardened targets. The weapon will operate from a variety of different launch scenarios (high/low altitude, level/dive/loft deliveries). Terminal impact angles can be optimized for hardened targets with a number of orientations (including vertical or horizontal targets).

2. Foreign Military Sales. Foreign Military Sales (FMS) procurement is anticipated after Operational Evaluation (OPEVAL). The USAF, as the executive service, is responsible for FMS.

E. DEVELOPMENTAL TEST AND OPERATIONAL TEST

1. Initial Operational Test and Evaluation (IOT&E) of the GBU-24 system was first conducted in 1987 by the USAF Tactical Air Warfare Center. Based on USAF results, CNO determined that the GBU-24 effectiveness and reliability met Navy requirements. The Navy conducted Follow-on Operational Test and Evaluation (FOT&E) (OT-III), verifying the compatibility and integration of the GBU-24 system as delivered from Naval aircraft. OT-III FOT&E of the GBU-24B/B project was conducted at Naval Air Warfare Center, Weapons Division (NAWCWD), China Lake and White Sands Missile Range (WSMR), from October to December 1993, and at sea aboard USS CAMDEN (AOE 2) and USS CARL VINSON (CVN-70) in October 1993.

2. Developmental Test and Evaluation (DT&E) of the GBU-24E/B will be conducted to ensure compatibility with Navy requirements. The developmental testing planned prior to and during operational testing will include tests structured to gather ground and flight test data for various areas of interest. These tests include Critical Technical Parameters (CTP) and test conditions that were not addressed or demonstrated at lesser levels during weapon development. GBU-24E/B weapon performance, integration and compatibility features will be determined against the requirements of Navy unique operations and environments. Flight test results will be used to validate the full interface and power-only mode of the weapon and carriage and release envelopes for the F/A-18 and F-14. Testing will support eventual fleet clearance for carriage and employment of the weapon system. All test results will be used to support a decision to initiate operational testing.

3. The GBU-24E/B has been enhanced with the addition of the navigational capability provided by a Global Positioning System (GPS). OT-IIIA will test this new capability and the legacy mode of the GBU-24E/B. OT-IIIA for GBU-24E/B is currently scheduled to be conducted in 2nd and 3rd quarter FY01 at various sites, including NAWCWD, China Lake and Point Mugu, WSMR, and at sea aboard an aircraft carrier (CV/CVN), under various environmental conditions. The GBU-24E/B system will be operated and maintained by VX-9 personnel during OT-IIIA.

F. AIRCRAFT AND/OR EQUIPMENT/SYSTEM/SUBSYSTEM REPLACED. The GBU-24 Series LLLGB, HTP does not replace any existing Navy or Marine Corps weapon system.

G. DESCRIPTION OF NEW DEVELOPMENT

1. GBU-24B/B Functional Description. The GBU-24B/B is a laser guided bomb capable of single or multiple carriage on host aircraft. Guidance is provided by laser energy reflected from the target. Target illumination may be provided by the delivery aircraft, another aircraft, or a ground designator. The weapon will operate from a variety of different launch scenarios (high/low altitude, level/dive/loft deliveries). Terminal impact angles can be optimized for hardened targets with a number of orientations (including vertical or horizontal targets). Four delivery options (MODEs) can be selected by setting the MODE switch (on the side of the Guidance Control Unit (GCU)) prior to aircraft takeoff. Once the weapon has been released from the aircraft, the ensuing flight can be divided into three phases: Initialization, Midcourse, and Terminal Guidance.

Initialization. During Initialization phase, there is an approximate two second wait period to permit safe separation distance of the weapon from the aircraft. The control system is then activated. The GCU determines the MODE selection and examines altitude data from the barometer within the GCU. From this available information, an optimum MIDCOURSE flight trajectory is determined.

Midcourse. The midcourse flight selection is based upon the conditions measured during the Initialization phase. The Midcourse flight profile and seeker scan functions are optimized to provide the best possible probability for acquiring the target, while maintaining the maximum energy for penetration. The midcourse phase is maintained until the target is acquired.

Terminal Guidance. After the weapon acquires the target, it enters the Terminal Guidance phase of flight. During this phase the weapon trajectory is optimized to provide the best possible penetration of the target, based upon the target conditions determined by the GCU during the Initialization phase of flight.

The following paragraphs provide a functional description of the GBU-24B/B GCU, Airfoil Group (AFG), Adapter Group (ADG), Fuze System, and penetrator body.

a. Guidance Control Unit, WGU-39/B. The GCU detects the laser energy reflected from the target, processes the signals, and guides the weapon to the target. The GCU consists of a seeker platform assembly, a guidance electronics unit (GEU), and a control actuator assembly. The seeker platform converts the laser energy into line-of-sight error signals and sends them to the GEU. The GEU receives the seeker platform signals and processes them into control commands for the control actuator assembly. There are four CODE SELECT switches and two MISSION SELECT switches (MODE and WEAPON IDENT) located on the side of the GEU that are set prior to aircraft launch to match mission requirements.

b. GCU Components

(1) Seeker Platform Assembly. The seeker platform is a gimbaled laser seeker. The laser sensor is a four-quadrant detector system that senses the location of a target within the instantaneous field of view. The laser energy reflected from the target is converted into line-of-sight error signals that are amplified, then sent to the GEU.

(2) Guidance Electronics Unit. The GEU receives the seeker platform signals and processes them into control commands for the control actuator assembly. The CPU-186A/B GEU contains four CODE SELECT switches and two MISSION SELECT switches located on the side of the GEU that are set prior to launch to match mission requirements.

(3) Control Actuator Assembly. The control actuator assembly contains the cold gas pneumatic system, barometer, control fin shafts, system battery, and system activation battery (thermal battery firing device). The system activation battery provides the voltage to activate the system thermal battery and gyro assemblies. The pneumatic system is a two-axis servosystem that receives commands from the GEU and positions the control fins to maneuver the weapon.

c. Airfoil Group, BSU-84/B and BSU-84A/B

The AFG consists of a forward adapter assembly, four control fin assemblies, a folding wing assembly, and three arming lanyards. The forward adapter assembly mounts the GCU to the warhead. The control fins attach to the control actuator assembly and maneuver the system in flight. The wing assembly spider and linkage assembly located in the interior of the AFG, when held by the wing release latch, compresses a set of springs and folds the wings into the fairing. Tripping the latch releases the spider. The springs push the spider and linkage assembly, moving the wings to the extended position. The wing release latch is activated when the weapon system is released from the aircraft, and after arming cable extraction.

d. Adapter Group, ADG-770/B. The adapter group consists of a hardback, two suspension lugs, two lug sleeves, aft fairing assembly, and an FZU extender. The hardback attaches to the BLU-109 bomb body and provides for the proper clearance of the weapon when attached to the aircraft. The lug sleeves bolt to the bomb body and the suspension lugs screw into the lug sleeves. The aft fairing assembly provides an aerodynamic interface between the bomb body and wing assembly. The FZU extender sits in the arming well of the BLU-109 bomb body and extends to the bottom of the hardback. The FZU arming cable is routed through the extender, and the FZU is attached to the hardback on top of the extender.

e. Fuze Assembly, FMU-143E/B. The fuze assembly consists of an FMU-143 bomb fuze, a retractile cable assembly, an arming lanyard, a safety pin WARNING flag, a fuze mount retainer, 2 eighteen inch lanyards, and an FZU-32B/B initiator. The FMU-143 bomb fuze assembly is designed to detonate 60 milliseconds after impact. A selected arming delay of 5.5 or 12 seconds is initiated when the bomb is released from the aircraft. The Navy is authorized the 12 seconds delay only because of safe separation concerns and premature detonations. The FZU-32B/B initiator is used to generate and supply power to arm the fuze.

f. Penetrator Warhead, BLU-109A/B. The bomb case is made from modified 4340 alloy steel with a body designed for improved ballistics. The heavy-walled steel case provides the penetration capabilities of 4 to 6 feet of reinforced concrete. A conduit (charging tube) connects the fuze well to the arming well. The fuze well accepts and mounts the FMU-143E/B fuze assembly. The FZU-32B/B initiator is mounted in the arming well on the upper surface of the bomb and is connected to the fuze via a retractile electrical cable through the charging tube conduit. The BLU-109A/B contains PBXN-109 explosive fill and is thermally protected to provide additional insensitive munitions capability over the original Tritonal fill used in the Air Force version.

2. GBU-24E/B Functional Description. The GBU-24E/B is a GPS-aided, all-weather guided bomb capable of single or multiple carriage on host aircraft. The GBU is normally mounted on aircraft with full or partial Military-Standard (MIL-STD)-1760 communications interface, but can alternatively be used on aircraft without any umbilical interface with the GBU. The GBU mission options are selected prior to captive carriage and delivery, and when installed on a full interface aircraft, the mission may be changed prior to weapon launch. In the enhanced mode the GBU is intended to engage stationary targets for which it has been prebriefed with target location information and mission options. It is also capable of engaging moving targets of opportunity when used as a conventional GBU when the all-weather enhanced capabilities are not required. Upon release in the enhanced mode, the GBU flies the selected midcourse and terminal trajectory to the prebriefed target location without requiring continuous laser designation. If a laser designated target is acquired within the field of regard, the GBU will upgrade the target coordinates using the location of the designated target. If released from the host aircraft without power applied, the GBU performs as a conventional laser guided bomb, searching for and engaging a properly coded continuous laser return without using prebriefed target coordinates. After launch, the weapon is in autopilot control until target acquisition. At target acquisition, the weapon is guided to target impact. The following paragraphs provide a functional description of the GBU-24E/B GCU, AFG, ADG, Fuze System, and penetrator body.

a. Guidance Control Unit, WGU-39A/B. The WGU-39A/B GCU provides the same primary laser guidance mode as the WGU-39/B, but the GCU has been modified to incorporate the GPS electronics, GPS antennas, the Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU), and the software updated to add the GPS/Inertial Navigation System (INS) guidance capability and integrate the existing laser processing. The guidance mode will be "accurate" when using GPS only, or "precision" when GPS guidance is augmented with midcourse or terminal lasing of the target. GCU capabilities with the various possible aircraft interfaces are as follows:

(1) Full Interface. When a full-interface is provided to the weapon (GCU), downloading of targeting data, weapon operating mode, GPS Crypto-Keying, GPS Emphemeris/Almanac data and transfer alignment information is provided by the aircraft. The GCU provides weapon status data back to the aircraft via the interface. Modification of targeting data is possible via the aircraft interface anytime prior to release of the weapon. The GBU-24E/B is configured to be compatible with the F/A-18C/D Operational Flight Program (OFP)-13C JDAM communications interface. The GCU has a Built-in-Test (BIT) capability. When the GBU-24 E/B is loaded on an aircraft with full interface, the aircrew will be able to perform BIT while the aircraft is in flight.

(2) Power-only Interface. When the GCU is provided with a power-only interface (such as the F-14 aircraft will provide), targeting data, GPS Almanac data and weapon operating mode are provided to the weapon via a Data Transfer Module (DTM). This DTM must be programmed (below deck) and plugged into the side of the GCU prior to aircraft take-off. GPS Crypto-Keying of the weapon GCU must be accomplished using a KYK-13 (or equivalent). All operations are accomplished by removing a small panel on the side of the GCU. GPS acquisition, IMU transfer alignment and development of a navigation solution are performed within the GCU after power-up. A signal line from the weapon is provided to indicate weapon "ready / not ready" status to the pilot. The time required to accomplish the acquisition and generation of guidance solutions is considerably longer than with full-interface communications with the aircraft. Re-targeting is not possible without removal and reprogramming of the DTM.

(3) No Interface. With no interface, the weapon GCU will operate in the laser-only mode, as if it were a GBU-24B/B. Four delivery options (MODEs) can be selected by setting the MODE switch (on the side of the GCU) prior to aircraft takeoff. Unlike the full-interface or power-only interfaces, the weapon is unpowered at release, and is activated upon separation via a lanyard attached to the GCU Battery Firing Device (BFD). Once the weapon has been released from the aircraft, the ensuing flight can be divided into three phases: Initialization, Midcourse, and Terminal Guidance.

b. Airfoil Group, BSU-84B/B. The BSU-84B/B consists of the wing assembly, the forward adapter assembly which attaches the GCU to the warhead, and the four canards which are installed into the GCU control section. The cant of the wings within the current wing assembly is being changed slightly to decrease the weapon rate of roll. The wings are folded within the wing assembly and are lanyard deployed upon separation from the aircraft. The wings and canards provide lift and turning capability which permit much longer range employment than earlier Paveway II laser-guided weapons.

c. Adapter Group, ADG-770A/B. The adapter group consists of a hardback, two suspension lugs, lug sleeves, and an aft fairing. The hardback provides proper spacing and mechanical interfacing of the weapon to a variety of Navy and Air Force aircraft bomb racks. The hardback originally used on the GBU-24B/B has been modified to provide a mounting for an electrical connector and a conduit for an electrical cable which connects the GCU to the MIL-STD-1760 aircraft interfacing connector on the aft end of the hardback. The lug sleeves bolt to the bomb body and the suspension lugs screw into the lug sleeves. The suspension lugs project through holes in the hardback. The aft fairing provides an aerodynamic interface between the warhead and wing assembly.

d. Warhead, BLU-109A/B. The GBU-24E/B uses the same BLU-109A/B warhead which has been qualified for use with the GBU-24B/B.

e. Fuze, FMU-143E/B. The GBU-24E/B uses the FMU-143E/B fuze, which has been qualified for use with the GBU-24B/B. The FZU-32B/B provides power for the fuze, following lanyard activation upon separation from the aircraft. The MIL-STD-1760 interface cable has necessitated a change in the arming wire routing to the aft solenoid.

f. Containers. The following is a list of the containers used to package the GBU-24 components:

GBU-24 Series Component Container
BLU-109A/B Warhead

FMU-143E/B Fuze

BSU-84/B, A/B, and B/B AFG

WGU-39/B and A/B GCU

ADG-770/B and A/B Adapter Group (Spacers)( MK 3 Lugs)

MHU-212/E Pallet

PA-60

CNU-373/E

CNU-371/E

CNU-439A/E (ADG 770/B)

or CNU-439 B/E(ADG-770A/B)

4. Physical Description. Physical characteristics of the GBU-24 Series weapons are as follows:

Dimensions GBU-24 B/B GBU-24 E/B
Length 169.7 in. 169.7 in.
Weight 2348.3 lb. 2411.5 lb.
Wing Span (closed) 36.0 in. 36.0 in.
Wing Span (open) 80.4 in. 80.4 in.
Suspension 30.0 in. 30.0 in.

5. New Development Introduction. The GBU-24B/B is currently in the fleet and the E/B will be introduced to the fleet as an upgraded follow-on to the GBU-24B/B weapon.

6. Significant Interfaces. The GBU-24E/B provides MIL-STD-1760 interface capability which significantly enhances its capability over the GBU-24B/B.

H. CONCEPTS

1. Operational Concept. GBU-24 Series LLLGB, HTP is designed to be deployed with Navy and Marine Corps tactical aircraft squadrons. GBU-24 is intended for use by F-14 and F/A-18 aircraft. GBU-24 is employed in various tactical applications by aircrews, and used during air-to-ground combat evolutions. The weapon is launched from an aircraft at enemy ground targets, guided by internal GPS guidance.

2. Maintenance Concept. The GBU-24 series maintenance concept is based on an over-all objective to ensure adequate tactical assets are available to fulfill commitments of operational activities and provide the means to restore unserviceable units/components to serviceable condition with minimal downtime. Maintenance requirements are allocated to three levels of maintenance as defined in the OPNAVINST 8000.16 (series).

a. Organizational. O-level maintenance for air-launched weapons is performed by personnel within the Aviation Ordnanceman (AO) rating. AOs with Navy Enlisted Classification Codes (NEC) 8341 or 8342 (F/A-18), 8335 or 8345 (F-14) and United States Marine Corps (USMC) Aviation Ordnance personnel with Military Occupational Specialty (MOS) 6531 perform organizational-level maintenance for air launched weapons on F/A-18 and F-14 aircraft. O-level maintenance consists of functions normally performed by an operating unit on a daily basis. O-level maintenance for the GBU-24 Series will consist of:

Aircraft preparation and release and control and interface checks

Visual inspection of weapon

Checking weapon mode switch settings

Weapon handling

Weapon loading and downloading.

Five AOs will be required to handle and load the GBU-24. Using the GBU-24 loading checklists for inspection and loading, a minimum of five USN AOs with NEC 8341 or 8342 (F/A-18), or 8335 or 8345 (F-14) or five USMC AOs with MOS 6531 (one load crew) per squadron are required during peacetime operations, even though only a portion of their workload will be driven by GBU-24 operations.

Visual inspection will be conducted prior to loading and after downloading. There are no preventive maintenance requirements at the O-level.

b. Intermediate. Intermediate-level maintenance is the responsibility of and is performed by designated maintenance activities that support user organizations. The I-level maintenance mission is to enhance and sustain combat readiness and mission capability by providing quality and timely material support to supported activities. The purpose of I-level maintenance is to ensure airborne weapons maintenance functions are performed at the level that ensures optimum economic use of resources. Tactical units requiring Beyond the Capability of Maintenance (BCM) at the I-level are returned to the Depot level maintenance activity ashore for repair or disposition. GBU-24 maintenance is performed ashore at Naval Air Stations (NAS), Marine Aviation Logistics Squadrons (MALS), and afloat on CV/CVNs by Weapons Department Navy AOs with NEC 6801 and Marines with MOS 6541. I-level maintenance of the GBU-24 consists of the following:

Weapon component unpacking and packing

Weapon component inspection

Weapon assembly and disassembly

Gyro switch setting

Weapon inspection

Identification and isolation of problems

Sub-assembly removal and replacement

Minor structural repair and corrosion control

Five AOs will be required to unpack and assembly GBU-24. Using the GBU-24 weapons assembly checklists for unpacking, inspecting, weapon assembly and disassembly, and packing, a minimum of five USN AOs with NEC 6801 per Weapons Department or five USMC AOs with MOS 6541 per MALS are required during peacetime operations, even though only a portion of their workload will be driven by GBU-24 operations.

c. Depot. Depot level maintenance for all GBU-24 components except the BLU-109 bomb body will be provided by Raytheon Systems Company (RSC), Tucson, AZ. Naval Weapons Stations (NWS) will process failed components back to the depot maintenance site. At a future date, depot level maintenance responsibilities will be assumed by the Government at a facility to be determined.

d. Interim Maintenance. The GBU-24 project office, located at NAWCWD, China Lake, California, provides GBU-24E/B technical assistance to organizational and intermediate activities. They provide On-the-Job Training for organizational and intermediate maintenance personnel and operational updates and briefings for flight crews.

3. Manning Concept. The introduction of GBU-24 series into the Navy inventory does not change current manpower requirements at organizational, intermediate, or depot level activities. Aircrew manpower is driven by seat factor and crew ratio. Enlisted manning for fleet squadrons, FRS, and I-level maintenance activities is based on the total assigned workload, not only on specific GBU-24 requirements. Skills required to support the GBU-24 are considered to be within the capability of personnel holding existing NEC/MOS.

4. Training Concept.

a. Training. A systems approach has been applied in the development and preparation of a training program that targets designated operator and maintainer training concurrently with aircraft Type/Model/Series (T/M/S) training conducted at various (in place) training sites. During Hardware/Manpower (HARDMAN) analysis, it was determined that new stand-alone operator or maintenance courses are not required. GBU-24 training is divided into organizational and intermediate-level maintenance, based on OPNAVINST 8000.16 (series). Organizational-level training is provided to operator and maintenance personal. Operator training is provided for F-14 pilots and Radar Intercept Officer (RIO) and F/A-18 pilot and Weapons and Sensor Operator (WSO) personnel. Organizational-level maintenance training is provided to AO personnel in the F-14 and F/A-18 communities with NEC codes 8341 and 8342 (F/A-18), 8335 and 8345 (F-14) and MOS 6531. Intermediate-level training is provided to AO maintenance personnel with NEC 6801 and MOS 6541.

The established training concept for most aviation maintenance training divides "A" School courses into two or more segments called Core and Strand. The "C" School courses are also divided into separate Initial and Career training courses. "A" School Core courses include general knowledge and skills training for the particular rating, while "A" School Strand courses focus on the more specialized training requirements for that rating and a specific aircraft or equipment, based on the student's fleet activity destination. Strand training immediately follows Core training and is part of the "A" School. Upon completion of Core and Strand "A" School, graduates attend the appropriate Initial "C" School for additional specific training. Initial "C" School training is intended for students with a paygrade of E-4 and below. Career "C" School training is provided for E-5 and above personnel to enhance skills and knowledge within their field.

Selected Reserve (SELRES) training is conducted by the Naval Air Reserve at each squadron site per current Commander, Naval Air Reserve Force (COMNAVAIRESFOR) instructions. The training is segmented and tailored for use by SELRES personnel during weekend drill periods and two-week active duty periods. If SELRES personnel and training quotas are available, COMNAVAIRESFOR must coordinate with appropriate quota controls to get training quotas at the FRSs.

(1) Initial Training. Initial training for the GBU-24B/B was conducted in 1994. Initial training for the GBU-24E/B will be provided to Operational Test and Evaluation Force (OPTEVFOR) personnel by Raytheon training personnel prior to the commencement of OPEVAL, and will also be provided to Naval Air Maintenance Training Group (NAMTRAGRU) and Fleet Weapon School Instructors prior to Initial Operating Capability (IOC). One (1) GBU-24E/B course titled "GBU-24E/B, Hard Target Penetrator, Laser Guided Bomb Fleet Familiarization" and sixteen (16) Inert Ground Handling/Loading weapons (Load Drill Trainers (LDT)) will be provided for initial and follow-on training. Delivery of LDTs to various Navy and Marine Corps Weapon Schools, and F/A-18 loading schools will have been completed prior to IOC. The GBU-24E/B Familiarization course will be delivered to the training sites at the same time that initial training is conducted at each site. This course material is to be used to update the current GBU-24 courseware at each training site, at the completion of initial training.

(2) Follow-on Training. Follow-on training for GBU-24E/B developed from the initial training package will be available as part of courses taught at the FRS, Strike Fighter Weapons School (SFWS) Atlantic and Pacific, Naval Strike and Air Warfare Center (NSAWC), and Naval Air Maintenance Training Group (NAMTRAGRU). The addition of GBU-24E/B data into the existing GBU-24 training courses will cause no change in student throughput or chargeable student billets. However, the addition of the GBU-24E/B data into the Precision Guided Weapons Intermediate Maintenance (C-122-3113) course will increase the course length from three to five days.

(a) Operator Training. Pilots, RIOs and WSOs are trained at the appropriate FRS for specific aircraft operation and weapons employment. Pilot, RIO, and WSO skills in tactics and ordnance delivery are further enhanced at the SFWS, NSAWC, and through squadron on-board proficiency training. Pilot and RIO/WSO personnel maintain their proficiency in the F-14 / F/A-18 aircraft through the use of simulators as well as in-aircraft flights. Aircraft Operational Flight Trainers (OFTs), Part Task Trainers (PTTs), Mission Trainers (MTs), and Weapon Systems Trainers (WSTs) provide a cost effective method which allows aircrews to simulate flight conditions to develop team coordination, practice weapon delivery, and simulate emergency procedures in a safe environment. In-aircraft flights allow aircrews to apply procedures practiced in the simulator in the actual flight environment. Actual in-aircraft missions are used to practice air combat maneuvers and weapon delivery procedures. The following table lists the applicable operator training courses. GBU-24E/B source material will be incorporated, and will cause no change in student throughput or chargeable student billets.

COURSE NUMBER COURSE TITLE
D/E-2A-0601 F/A-18 Fleet Replacement Pilot Cat 1
D/E-2A-0602 F/A-18 Fleet Replacement Pilot (Attack) Cat 2
D/E-2A-0604 F/A-18 Fleet Replacement Pilot Cat 3A
D/E-2A-0606 F/A-18 Fleet Replacement Pilot Cat 4
None (USMC) F/A-18D Fleet Replacement Pilot Category 1
None (USMC) F/A-18D Fleet Replacement Pilot Category 2
None (USMC) F/A-18D Fleet Replacement Pilot Category 3
None (USMC) F/A-18D Fleet Replacement Pilot Category 4
None (USMC) F/A-18D Weapon and Sensor Operator (WSO) Category 1
None (USMC) F/A-18D Weapon and Sensor Operator (WSO) Category 2
None (USMC) F/A-18D Weapon and Sensor Operator (WSO) Category 3
None (USMC) F/A-18D Weapon and Sensor Operator (WSO) Category 4
D-2A-1601 F-14 Pilot Category 1
D-2A-1602 F-14 Pilot Category 2
D-2A-1603 F-14 Pilot Category 3
D-2A-1604 F-14 Pilot Category 4
D-2A-1631 F-14D Fleet Replacement Pilot Cat 1
D-2A-1634 F-14D Fleet Replacement Pilot Cat 2
D-2A-1637 F-14D Fleet Replacement Pilot Cat 3
D-2A-1640 F-14D Fleet Replacement Pilot Cat 4
D-2D-1601 F-14 Naval Flight Officer Category 1
D-2D-1602 F-14 Naval Flight Officer Category 2
D-2D-1603 F-14 Naval Flight Officer Category 3
D-2D-1604 F-14 Naval Flight Officer Category 4
D-2D-1631 F-14D Fleet Replacement NFO Category 1
D-2D-1634 F-14D Fleet Replacement NFO Category 2
D-2D-1637 F-14D Fleet Replacement NFO Category 3
D-2D-1640 F-14D Fleet Replacement NFO Category 4

(b) Organizational-level Maintenance Training. Organizational-level maintenance personnel are trained at the appropriate MTU for specific aircraft/weapon loading and maintenance. Weapon loading skills are further enhanced at SFWS, and through on-board proficiency training. A new training concept for most aviation maintenance training has been established. This concept entails dividing C1 courses into separate initial and career training courses. Initial "C" School training is intended for students with a paygrade of E-4 and below. Career "C" School training is provided to personnel E-5 and above to enhance their skills and knowledge within their field. GBU-24 E/B will be taught in the following organizational-level maintenance training courses. Source material will be incorporated into these courses with minimal impact, and cause no change in student throughput or chargeable student billets. The Training Device (TD) that is required for organizational level weapons load training is the LDT.

COURSE NUMBER COURSE TITLE
C-646-9973 F/A-18 Stores Management System (Initial) Organizational Maintenance
C-646-9974 F/A-18 Stores Management System (Career) Organizational Maintenance
D/E-646-0640 F/A-18 Conventional Weapons Loading
D/E-646-0647 F/A-18 Conventional Release System Test
D-646-1647 F-14 Armament Systems (Initial) Organizational Maintenance
D-646-1641 F-14 Armament Systems (Career) Organizational Maintenance
D-646-1640 F-14D Armament Systems Career O-level Maintenance

(c) Intermediate-level Maintenance Training. Intermediate-level maintenance training is available for USN and USMC AOs through the appropriate MTU or Fleet Readiness Enlisted Skills Training (FREST). Existing courses will be updated to include GBU-24E/B data and will extend the course length of the Precision Guided Weapons Intermediate Maintenance (C-122-3113) course from three to five days. Aviation Specialized Training Group (FASO), Atlantic is organized with a Mobile Ordnance Training Team (MOTT) that provides hands-on training for Atlantic Fleet Navy squadrons and CV and CVN ships and shore activities in conventional weapons handling, safety, and stowage. Pacific Fleet MOTT is provided by Commander, Naval Air Force, Pacific Fleet (COMNAVAIRPAC) N85. Requests for MOTT training should be submitted to COMNAVAIRPAC (N85) for Pacific Fleet activities, and to Commander, Naval Air Force, Atlantic Fleet (COMNAVAIRLANT) N85 for Atlantic Fleet activities. The Training Device (TD) that is required for organizational level weapons load training is the LDT.

Title General Shipboard NAS Weapons Department Aviation Ordnance Maintenance
CIN D/E-646-7007
Model Manager MTU 4030 NAMTRAGRU DET Mayport, Florida
Description This course provides training in procedures and safety requirements for:

Receiving, transferring, and stowing conventional weapons

Assembly and disassembly of bombs and rockets

Loading and unloading flare and rocket launchers

Loading and unloading the linkless ammunition loading system

Canning and decanning of miscellaneous ordnance

Complying with applicable publications

This course covers Weapons Department Administration and General Ordnance; and Aircraft Munitions, Assembly and Disassembly. Upon completion of this course, the Aviation Ordnanceman assigned to an Naval Air Station (NAS) Weapons Department or aircraft carrier Weapons Department as conventional weapons handler will have sufficient knowledge and skills to work under minimum supervision in a shipboard or shore environment.

Locations MTU 4030, NAMTRAGRU DET Mayport

MTU 4032, NAMTRAGRU DET, Norfolk, Virginia

MTU 4033, NAMTRAGRU DET, North Island, California

MTU 4035, NAMTRAGRU DET, Whidbey Island, Washington

Length 39 days
RFT date Currently available
Skill identifier AO 6801
TTE/TD Refer to element IV.A.1 for Technical Training Equipment (TTE). Training Device (TD) is the LDT
Prerequisite C-646-2013, Aviation Ordnanceman Ship's Company Strand Class A1 or equivalent background knowledge of the ordnance field

Title Strike Armament Systems Intermediate Maintenance
CIN D/E-646-7001
Model Manager MTU 4033 NAMTRAGRU DET
Description This course provides training in procedures and safety requirements for aircraft armament equipment to include:

Operational checkout

Corrosion control

Troubleshooting

Periodic maintenance

Component removal, repair and replacement

Use of publications, special tools, and test equipment

Upon completion of this course, the Aviation Ordnanceman assigned to an Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance Department will have sufficient knowledge and skills to work on aircraft armament equipment under minimum supervision in a shipboard or shore environment.

Locations MTU 4032, NAMTRAGRU DET Norfolk

MTU 4033, NAMTRAGRU DET North Island

Length 65 days
RFT date Currently available
Skill identifier AO 6802
TTE/TD Refer to element IV.A.1 for TTE. TD is the LDT
Prerequisite C-646-2011, Aviation Ordnanceman Common Core Class A1

Title

Aviation Ordnance Intermediate Maintenance Technician
CIN M-646-7026
Model Manager NAMTRAGRU DET Cherry Point, North Carolina
Description This course provides training in procedures and safety requirements for:

Receiving, transferring, handling and stowing of aircraft gun systems and ammunition

Assembly, disassembly, inspection, and functional check of aircraft gun systems and ammunition

Troubleshooting aircraft gun systems and electronic control units

Safety precautions for aircraft gun systems and ammunition

Upon completion of this course, the Aviation Ordnanceman assigned to a USMC intermediate maintenance activity will have sufficient knowledge and skills to work on aircraft gun systems and ammunition under minimum supervision.

Location VMAT-203 FREST, MCAS Cherry Point, North Carolina
Length 79 days
RFT date Currently available
Skill identifier MOS 6541
TTE/TD Refer to element IV.A.1 for TTE. TD is the LDT
Prerequisite C-646-2012, Aviation Ordnanceman Airwing Strand Class A1

(d) Explosive Ordnance Disposal Training. Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) training is presently conducted by the Naval Explosive Ordnance Disposal School (NAVSCOLEOD) at Eglin AFB, Fort Walton Beach, Florida. Additional advanced and specialized EOD training is provided by EOD Technical Evaluation Units (EODTEUs) at Naval Amphibious Base (NAB) Little Creek, Virginia and Naval Station (NS) San Diego, California. The following EOD courses will be modified to include GBU-24E/B data:

COURSE NUMBER COURSE TITLE
A-431-0011 Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) Phase II (Navy)
A-431-0012 Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) Phase II
G-431-0001 (EOD) Pre-deployment Team Training

(e) Student Profiles. The following prerequisite skill and knowledge requirements must be completed prior to attending NEC 6801 and MOS 6541 training.

SKILL

IDENTIFIER

PREREQUISITE SKILL

AND KNOWLEDGE REQUIREMENTS

AO 6801 C-646-2011, Aviation Ordnance Common Core Class A1

And

C-646-2012, Aviation Ordnance Airwing Strand Class A1

Or

C-646-2013, Aviation Ordnance Weapons Department Strand Class A1

MOS 6541 C-646-2011, Aviation Ordnance Common Core Class A1

And

C-646-2012, Aviation Ordnance Airwing Strand Class A1

Or

C-646-2013, Aviation Ordnance Weapons Department Strand Class A1

The following table lists the enlisted manpower and personnel classifications required that support GBU-24.

RATING and

NEC or MOS

TITLE
AO 8341 F/A-18 Armament System Organizational Apprentice Maintenance Technician
AO 8342 F/A-18 System Organizational Maintenance Technician
AO 6531 Aircraft Ordnance Technician (F/A-18)
AO 6541 Aviation Ordnance Intermediate Maintenance Technician
AO 6801 Air Launched Weapons Technician
AO 8845 F-14 Armament Systems Initial O-level Maintenance
AO 8345 F-14 Armament Systems Career O-level Maintenance
AO 8335 F-14D Armament Systems Career O-level Maintenance

(f) Training Pipelines. The following training tracks apply and are available in the Office of Chief of Naval Operations (OPNAV) Aviation Training Management System (OATMS). The addition of GBU-24E/B data into the existing GBU-24 training courses will cause no change in student throughput or chargeable student billets. However, the addition of the GBU-24E/B data into the Precision Guided Weapons Intermediate Maintenance (C-122-3113) course will increase the course length from three to five days. There are no new training pipelines required for the operation and maintenance of the GBU-24E/B.

TRACK NUMBER TRACK TITLE
D/E-646-0641 F/A-18 Systems Organizational Maintenance Technician
D/E-646-7007 General Shipboard/NAS Weapons Department Aviation Ordnance Maintenance
M-646-7026 Aviation Ordnance Technician Intermediate Maintenance
D/E-646-0653 F/A-18 Armament Systems Organizational Maintenance

b. Training Devices and Technical Training Equipment (TD/TTE). The GBU-24 TD is the (inert) GBU-24B/B LDT and will be used only for load drill training. The LDT is internally ballasted to the approximate weight and balance of the GBU-24B/B. The LDT's may be uploaded and downloaded on F-14 and F/A-18 aircraft, and handled on authorized equipment for training purposes but are not authorized for flight.

Practical and Classroom Explosive Ordnance Disposal System Trainers (PEST/CEST) will be required for the EOD training facilities. The PEST is a full-scale model fabricated from actual hardware, having approximately the same weight and center of gravity as the tactical weapon. The PEST is used for teaching render-safe procedures. CEST is an inert, cut-away model of the GBU-24, displaying locations and types of explosive and hazardous materials, initiators, igniters, and fuze, to facilitate instruction on the weapon. The PEST will be provided, and a GBU-24 series system will be provided to allow the EOD community to design and construct a CEST to meet specific classroom requirements.

I. ON-BOARD (IN-SERVICE) TRAINING

1. Proficiency or Other Training Organic to the New Development

a. Maintenance Training Improvement Program. The Maintenance Training Improvement Program (MTIP) is used to establish an effective and efficient training system responsive to fleet training requirements. MTIP is a training management tool that, through diagnostic testing, identifies individual training deficiencies at the O and I-levels of maintenance. MTIP is the comprehensive testing of one's knowledge. It consists of a bank of test questions managed through automated data processing. MTIP was implemented per OPNAVINST 4790.2 series. MTIP allows increased effectiveness in the application of training resources through identification of skills and knowledge deficiencies at the activity, work center, or individual technician level. Refresher training is concentrated where needed to improve identified skill and knowledge shortfalls. MTIP will be replaced by the Aviation Maintenance Training Continuum System (AMTCS). Current planning is for AMTCS to begin full implementation for fleet deployment on FY02.

b. Aviation Maintenance Training Continuum System. AMTCS will provide career path training to the Sailor or Marine from their initial service entry to the end of their military career. AMTCS is planned to be an integrated system that will satisfy the training and administrative requirements of both the individual and the organization. The benefits will be manifested in the increased effectiveness of technicians and the increased efficiencies of the management of the training business process. By capitalizing on technological advances and integrating systems and processes where appropriate, the right amount of training can be provided at the right time, thus meeting the CNO mandated "just-in-time" training approach.

Technology investments enable the development of several state-of-the-art training and administrative tools: Computer-Based Training (CBT) for the technicians in the Fleet in the form of Interactive Courseware (ICW) with Computer Managed Instruction (CMI) and Computer Aided Instruction (CAI) for the schoolhouse.

Included in the AMTCS development effort is the Aviation Maintenance Training Continuum System - Software Module (ASM) which provides testing (Test and Evaluation (TEV)), recording (Electronic Training Jacket (ETJ)), and a Feedback system. The core functionality of these AMTCS tools are based and designed around the actual maintenance-related tasks the technicians perform, and the tasks are stored and maintained in a Master Task List (MTL) data bank. These tools are procured and fielded with appropriate Commercial Off-the-Shelf (COTS) hardware and software, i.e. Fleet Training Devices (FTD) - Laptops, Personal Computers (PCs), Electronic Classrooms (ECR), Learning Resource Centers (LRC), operating software, and network software and hardware.

Upon receipt of direction from OPNAV (N789H), AMTCS is to be implemented and the new tools integrated into the daily training environment of all participating aviation activities and supporting elements. AMTCS will serve as the standard training system for aviation maintenance training within the Navy and Marine Corps, and is planned to supersede the existing MTIP and Maintenance Training Management and Evaluation Program (MTMEP) programs.

c. Strike Fighter Training Program. NSAWC N7 (Topgun), SFWS Atlantic, and SFWS Pacific are developing post-FRS training at the squadron level for Navy Strike Fighter aircraft (F/A-18). This post-FRS training continuum is known as the Strike Fighter Training Program (SFTP) and is composed of three equally critical elements: the Strike Fighter Weapons and Tactics (SFWT) curricula, the Strike Fighter Tactics Instructor (SFTI), and the SFTS. The SFWT curricula will be taught by each squadron's SFTI, who will be supported by the SFTS, a multimedia CBT system that will host CMI, CAI, CBT and ICW. Aircrew weapons proficiency training will continue to be accomplished using existing methods: Academic, Simulator (e.g., Weapons Tactics Trainer/Weapons System Trainer), Captive Air Training Missile (CATM) and/or embedded aircraft simulation, and live missile shots supported by the Non-Combat Expenditure Allowance. However, capability ratings will be based upon performance rather than completion, i.e., it will not be based simply upon completing the training events, but upon how well they are completed. Training events will be measured using defined metrics, and collectively these events will be evaluated to determine actual combat readiness, quantitatively (objectively) rather than qualitatively (subjectively).

2. Personnel Qualification Standards. Not Applicable (NA)

3. Other Onboard In-Service Training Packages. Squadron loading teams will maintain their proficiency by participating in frequent upload and download training exercises.

a. Conventional Weapons Technical Proficiency Inspection. The Conventional Weapon Technical Proficiency Inspection (CWTPI) is a graded inspection administered by SFWS for the F/A-18 aircraft. The CWTPI covers all areas of conventional weapon load and release and control system checks. The inspection evaluates the squadron's ability to wire-check, upload and download conventional ordnance, use applicable publications, and place ordnance on its designated target. The squadron inspection is conducted annually, six months prior to deployment, or at the request of the squadron's Commanding Officer. A written examination is required by all personnel, including squadron aviators, directly involved in the inspection. A 72-hour time limit is granted for the completion of the entire evolution. The final grade is an average score derived from the written exams, ordnance loads, wire checks, and the aviator's proficiency to deliver weapons on target. Pre-inspection training is provided by the appropriate SFWS followed by the CWTPI. The CWTPI determines the need for further conventional weapons load training of squadron AO and Aviation Electronics Technician personnel at the appropriate school.

b. Marine Corps Onboard Training. The Marine Corps onboard training is based on the current series of Marine Corps Order (MCO) P4790.12, Individual Training Standards System and Marine Aviation Training Management Evaluation Program (MATMEP). This program is designed to meet Marine Corps, as well as Navy OPNAVINST 4790.2 (Series), maintenance training requirements. It is a performance-based, standardized, level-progressive, documentable, training management and evaluation program. It identifies and prioritizes task inventories by MOS through a front-end analysis process that identifies task, skill, and knowledge requirements of each MOS. MTIP questions coupled to MATMEP tasks will help identify training deficiencies that can be addressed with remedial training.

USMC activities are scheduled yearly for Marine Corps Combat Readiness Evaluation by Headquarters, Marine Corps. Marine Corps activities participate in war exercises and are evaluated. Training is an ongoing Marine Corps evolution that culminates with the Combat Readiness Evaluation. The evaluation determines the need for further conventional weapons load training of squadron personnel.

c. United States Navy Explosive Safety Policies, Requirements, and Procedures. The United States Navy Explosive Safety Policies, Requirements, and Procedures (Department of the Navy Explosives Safety Policy) OPNAVINST 8020.14 (series), promulgates the Explosives Handling Personnel Qualification and Certification program. The Qualification and Certification program is designed to ensure that all Navy, Marine Corps, and civilians required to handle explosives or explosive devices are fully trained and qualified to perform all functions and tasks safety.

J. LOGISTICS SUPPORT

1. Manufacturer and Contract Numbers

CONTRACT NUMBER MANUFACTURER ADDRESS
F42630-96-C-0002 Raytheon Systems Company (RSC) P.O. Box 11337

Tucson, AZ 85743-1337

2. Program Documentation. The Naval Air Systems Command published and distributed Integrated Logistics Support Plan (ILSP) Number WP-354 dated Mar 95.

3. Technical Data Plan. Navy technical manual requirements have been developed per the Technical Manual Contract Requirements (TMCR) 79-92 document as listed below.

Table I-8. Technical Manuals

TITLE MANUAL NUMBER DATE USER LEVEL
F/A-18C/D Airborne Weapons Stores Loading Manual A1-F18AE-LWS-000 Interim Change

Sept 98

Organizational
F/A-18C/D Airborne Weapons Stores Loading Checklist (GBU-24) A1-F18AE-LWS-660 Change 1

July 99

Organizational
F/A-18E/F Airborne Weapons Stores Loading Manual A1-F18EA-LWS-000 1 August 1999 Organizational
F/A-18E/F Airborne Weapons Stores Loading Checklist (GBU-24) A1-F18EA-LWS-660 TBD Organizational
Support Equipment Configuration Manual NAVAIR 11-140-25 Interim Change

Mar 97

Organizational/Intermediate
Intermediate Maintenance Weapons Support Facilities GBU-24 series NAVAIR 11-5A-36 Change 1

Nov 99

Intermediate
Airborne Weapons Assembly Manual for GBU NAVAIR 11-140-10 Apr 2000 Intermediate
Airborne Weapons Assembly Checklist for Paveway III, GBU NAVAIR 140-10-2 Change 1

Mar 2000

Intermediate
Ships Weapons Installation Manual NAVAIR 11-120-83 Feb 97 Intermediate
F-14 Airborne Weapons/Stores Loading Manual NA 01-F14AAA-75 Change 2

Feb 2000

Organizational
F-14 Airborne Weapons/Stores Loading Checklist(GBU-24) NA 01-F14AAA-75-34 March 2000 Organizational

4. Test Sets, Tools, and Test Equipment

The GBU-24 has a limited requirement for special tools, which are listed in table I-9.

5. Depot Level Maintenance. All D-level maintenance on GBU-24 series weapons, with the exception of the BLU-109 bomb body, is currently provided by RCS, Tucson, AZ. At a future date, D-level maintenance will be provided at a Government facility to be determined.

6. Repair Parts. Repair parts lists are located in NA 11-140-10 and NA 11-5A-36 manuals.

7. Human Systems Integration. NA

Table I-9. GBU-24 Series Special Tools

Nomenclature Part Number/NSN Usage
1-inch drive, 8-inch extension (Note 1) 5861 GBU-24 buildup
Actuator, Wing 2713536-1 Folding of wing assemblies
Adapter, ratchet, (Note 1) L673A, A-A-2173 GGG-W-641 GBU-24 buildup
Adapter, wrench, 3 Finger Socket (Note 1) 824449-3 Install/remove retainer bolt, GBU-24B/B
Pocket Level and Plumb, Torpedo (Note 1) 5210-00-516-3356 Align GCU gyro, GBU-24B/B
Retainer Wrench (Fuze) (Note 1) 923AS219-2 Install/remove fuze mounting retainer
Retainer Wrench (Initiator) (Note 1) 923AS328 Install/remove initiator retaining ring
Straight Shaft Tool Local Manufacture Remove adapter spacer / retainer flange, GBU-24E/B
Wrench, Torque, 000-1000 foot-lbs. TQ (Note 1) 1003A AA-24115120-00-555-1521 GBU-24 buildup
Wrench, Torque, 000-300 inch-lbs. TE 25A A-A-2411 GBU-24 buildup
Wrench, Torque, 000-150 inch-lbs. TE 12A GBU-24 buildup
Wrench, Torque, 000-600 inch-lbs. TE 50A GBU-24 buildup

NOTES: 1. Item part of GBU Tool Set, 787AS709.

K. SCHEDULES

1. Schedule of Events

a. Installation/Delivery Schedule. TBD

b. Ready for Operational Use Schedule. To ensure all activities are Ready for Operational Use (RFOU) with GBU-24E/B, all training activities will receive initial training prior to IOC and provide training to fleet activities deploying with the GBU-24E/B.

c. Time Required to Install at Operational Sites. NA

d. Foreign Military Sales and Other Source Delivery Schedule. FMS procurement is anticipated after OPEVAL. The USAF is the executive service for the GBU-24 and is responsible for FMS activities.

e. Training Device and Technical Training Equipment Delivery Schedule. LDTs have been positioned at all training sites. PEST and CEST TBD

L. GOVERNMENT FURNISHED EQUIPMENT AND CONTRACTOR FURNISHED EQUIPMENT TRAINING REQUIREMENTS. NA

M. RELATED NTSPs AND OTHER APPLICABLE DOCUMENTS

DOCUMENT TITLE DOCUMENT

NUMBER

PDA

CODE

STATUS
F/A-18 Weapon System NTSP A-50-7703G/A PMA265 Approved

Nov 97

F-14 Weapon System NTSP N88-NTSP-A-50-8511B/A PMA-241 Approved

Mar 00

Integrated Logistic Support Plan (ILSP) WP-354 AIR-3.1.1 Approved

Mar 95



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