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NAVY TRAINING SYSTEM PLAN

FOR

AVIATION LIFE SUPPORT SYSTEMS

N88-NTSP-A-50-9206A/D

JUNE 2000

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

This Navy Training System Plan (NTSP) identifies manpower, personnel, and training requirements associated with Aviation Life Support Systems (ALSS). ALSS include specialized clothing and equipment designed to permit aircrew personnel to function within their flight environment, safely escape from a disabled aircraft, survive after escaping the aircraft, and facilitate Search and Rescue (SAR) efforts. Several new systems are being added to the ALSS inventory including the following:

    • Navy Combat Edge (NCE) Anti-Gravity Flight Ensemble
    • CWU-79/P Passenger Anti-Exposure Survival Suit (PAESS)
    • A/P22P-7(V) Quick Donning Flyer's Anti-Exposure Apparel Assembly CWU-60/P
    • AN/URT-140 Radio Beacon Set
    • AN/PRC-149 Radio Set
    • Advanced Laser Eye Protection Visor (ALEPV)
    • MBU-23(V)/P Enhanced Pressure-Demand Oxygen Mask
    • FLU-8B/P Automatic Inflation Device
    • LPU-32/P Life Preserver Assembly
    • LPU-33/P and LPU-34/P Low-Profile Floatation Collars (LPFC)
    • LRU-30/A, LRU-31/A, and LRU-32/A Multi-Place Life Rafts (MPLR)
    • SRU-40/P Helicopter Aircrew Breathing Device (HABD)
    • Joint Service Aircrew Mask (JSAM)
    • Joint Protective Aircrew Ensemble (JPACE)
    • Integrated Helmet Mounted Display and Sighting System (IHMDSS)
    • Onboard Oxygen Gas Generating System (OBOGGS)
    • Onboard Inert Gas Generating System (OBIGGS)

Navy Aircrew Survival Equipmentman (PR) personnel and Flight Equipment Marines with Military Occupational Specialty (MOS) 6060 perform maintenance of most ALSS at the organizational and intermediate levels. At the organizational level, Aviation Structural Mechanic (Safety Equipment) (AME) personnel and Marine Corps Aircraft Safety Equipment Mechanics with Navy Enlisted Classifications (NEC) or MOSs applicable to the specific aircraft perform maintenance on ejection seats and oxygen systems.

ALSS operator training is integrated into general and aircraft-specific aircrew training through the Naval Aviation Survival Training Program and Fleet Readiness Squadron Training, and has a separate NTSP documenting specific requirements. Maintenance training for PRs and Marines with MOS 6060 is currently established in class A1 and C1 courses. Maintenance training for AMEs and Marine Aircraft Safety Equipment Mechanics is provided through aircraft-specific Naval Aviation Maintenance Training Group Detachment courses.

Since ALSS is a mature program, all manpower requirements are established. No changes to existing manpower are projected.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Page

Executive Summary i

List of Acronyms iii

Preface vi

PART I - TECHNICAL PROGRAM DATA

A. Nomenclature-Title-Program I-1

B. Security Classification I-1

C. Manpower, Personnel, and Training Principals I-1

D. System Description I-2

E. Developmental Test and Operational Test I-2

F. Aircraft and/or Equipment/System/Subsystem Replaced I-3

G. Description of New Development I-4

H. Concepts I-32

I. Onboard (In-Service) Training I-40

J. Logistics Support I-42

K. Schedules I-46

    1. Government Furnished Equipment and Contractor Furnished Equipment

Training Requirements I-48

M. Related NTSPs and Other Applicable Documents I-48

PART II - BILLET AND PERSONNEL REQUIREMENTS II-1

PART III - TRAINING REQUIREMENTS III-1

PART IV - TRAINING LOGISTICS SUPPORT REQUIREMENTS IV-1

PART V - MPT MILESTONES V-1

PART VI - DECISION ITEMS/ACTION REQUIRED VI-1

PART VII - POINTS OF CONTACT VII-1

LIST OF ACRONYMS

ABO

Aviators Breathing Oxygen

AEPS

Aircrew Escape Propulsion System

AIMD

Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance Department

ALEPV

Advanced Laser Eye Protection Visor

ALSS

Aviation Life Support Systems

AME

Aviation Structural Mechanic (Safety Equipment)

AMTCS

Aviation Maintenance Training Continuum System

ANVIS

Aviators Night Vision Imaging System

ASTC

Aviation Survival Training Center

AT

Aviation Electronics Technician

   

BTN

Below-The-Neck

   

CAD

Cartridge Actuated Device

CBR

Chemical, Biological, and Radiological

CNO

Chief of Naval Operations

CO2

Carbon Dioxide

COMNAVAIRLANT

Commander Naval Air Force Atlantic Fleet

COMNAVAIRPAC

Commander Naval Air Force Pacific Fleet

CW

Continuous Wave

   

DME

Distance Measuring Equipment

DT

Developmental Test

   

EOD

Explosive Ordnance Disposal

   

FAILSAFE

Fleet Air Introduction Liaison Survival Aircrew Flight Equipment

FMS

Foreign Military Sales

FRS

Fleet Readiness Squadron

FY

Fiscal Year

   

G

Gravity

GSA

Government Services Administration

+Gz

High Positive Acceleration

   

HABD

Helicopter Aircrew Breathing Device

HEED

Helicopter Emergency Egress Device

HF

High Frequency

   

IHMDSS

Integrated Helmet Mounted Display and Sighting System

ILSP

Integrated Logistics Support Plan

IOC

Initial Operational Capability

   

JHMCS

Joint Helmet Mounted Cueing System

JPACE

Joint Protective Aircrew Ensemble

JSAM

Joint Service Aircrew Mask

JSTRAP

Joint Systems Training Plan

   

LOX

Liquid Oxygen

LPFC

Low-Profile Floatation Collar

LSC

Lifesaving Systems Corporation

   

MATMEP

Maintenance Training Management and Evaluation Program

MCAS

Marine Corps Air Station

MOS

Military Occupational Specialty

MPLR

Multi-Place Life Raft

MRC

Maintenance Requirement Card

MSD

Material Support Date

MTIP

Maintenance Training Improvement Program

MTRR

Maintenance Training Requirements Review

MTU

Maintenance Training Unit

   

NA

Not Applicable

NACES

Navy Aircrew Common Ejection Seat

NADEP

Naval Aviation Depot

NAF

Naval Air Facility

NAMP

Naval Aviation Maintenance Program

NAS

Naval Air Station

NASTP

Naval Aviation Survival Training Program

NATEC

Naval Air Technical Data and Engineering Service Command

NATOPS

Naval Air Training and Operating Procedures Standardization

NATTC

Naval Air Technical Training Center

NAVICP

Naval Inventory Control Point

NAWCAD

Naval Air Warfare Center Aircraft Division

NCE

Navy Combat Edge

NDI

Non-Developmental Item

NEC

Navy Enlisted Classification

NES

Navy Egress System

NOMI

Naval Operational Medicine Institute

NTSP

Navy Training System Plan

NVIIS

Night Vision Image Intensifier Set

   

OBIGGS

Onboard Inert Gas Generating System

OBOGGS

Onboard Oxygen Gas Generating System

OBOGS

Onboard Oxygen Generating System

OEAS

Oxygen Enriched Air System

OMD

Operational Maintenance Department

OPNAV

Office of the Chief of Naval Operations

OPNAVINST

Office of the Chief of Naval Operations Instruction

OT

Operational Test

   

PAESS

Passenger Anti-Exposure Survival Suit

PBG

Pressure Breathing for G

PHSRU

Parachute Harness Sensing Release Unit

PM

Preventive Maintenance

PMA

Program Manager, Air

PR

Aircrew Survival Equipmentman

PSI

Pounds Per Square Inch

   

RFT

Ready For Training

   

SAR

Search And Rescue

SDLM

Standard Depot Level Maintenance

SEAWARS

Sea Water Activated Release System

SSP

Standard Soft Pack

   

TPL

Thermoplastic Liner

TTE

Technical Training Equipment

   

UHF

Ultra High Frequency

ULSS

User's Logistics Support Summary

   

WC

Work Center

PREFACE

The Aviation Life Support Systems (ALSS) Navy Training System Plan (NTSP) was first developed in August 1991. This Draft NTSP updates the Approved NTSP, A-50-9206/A, dated June 1997, and complies with the guidelines set forth in the Navy Training Requirements Documentation Manual, OPNAV P-751-1-9-97. This update reflects the latest information on the ALSS program. Specifically, adding new systems to the ALSS inventory including:

    • The Navy Combat Edge (NCE) Anti-Gravity Flight Ensemble
    • CWU-79/P Passenger Anti-Exposure Survival Suit (PAESS)
    • A/P22P-7(V) Quick Donning Flyer's Anti-Exposure Apparel Assembly CWU-60/P
    • AN/URT-140 Radio Beacon Set
    • AN/PRC-149 Radio Set
    • Advanced Laser Eye Protection Visor (ALEPV)
    • MBU-23(V)/P Enhanced Pressure-Demand Oxygen Mask
    • FLU-8B/P Automatic Inflation Device
    • LPU-32/P Life Preserver Assembly
    • LPU-33/P and LPU-34/P Low-Profile Floatation Collars (LPFC)
    • LRU-30/A, LRU-31/A, and LRU-32/A Multi-Place Life Rafts (MPLR)
    • SRU-40/P Helicopter Aircrew Breathing Device (HABD)
    • Joint Service Aircrew Mask (JSAM)
    • Joint Protective Aircrew Ensemble (JPACE)
    • Integrated Helmet Mounted Display and Sighting System (IHMDSS)
    • Onboard Oxygen Gas Generating System (OBOGGS)
    • Onboard Inert Gas Generating System (OBIGGS)

Four other new systems are part of ALSS, but have separate NTSPs documenting their specific requirements. They are:

    • AN/AVS-9(V) Night Vision Image Intensifier Set
    • SJU-17 (V) Navy Aircrew Common Ejection Seat (NACES)
    • Oxygen Enriched Air System (OEAS)
    • Joint Helmet Mounted Cueing System (JHMCS)

Although considered a part of ALSS, ejection seats are beyond the scope of this NTSP and have been removed. Specific information regarding ejection seats and associated training tracks for Aviation Structural Mechanic (Safety Equipment) (AME) personnel is found in the individual aircraft NTSPs as referenced in Part I, section M of this document. Refer to A-50-9803/D for information on ALSS operator training through the Naval Aviation Survival Training Program (NASTP).

N88-NTSP-A-50-9206A/D

June 2000

PART I - TECHNICAL PROGRAM DATA

A. NOMENCLATURE-TITLE-PROGRAM

1. Nomenclature-Title-Acronym. Aviation Life Support Systems (ALSS)

2. Program Element

a. Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation 0604264NBA5

b. Operation and Maintenance 0702207NBA1

c. Other Procurements 070801NBA3

B. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION

1. System Characteristics Unclassified

2. Capabilities Unclassified

3. Functions Unclassified

C. MANPOWER, PERSONNEL, AND TRAINING PRINCIPALS

OPNAV Principal Official (OPO) Program Sponsor CNO (N880G4)

OPO Resource Sponsor CNO (N880G4)

Marine Corps Program Sponsor CMC (ASL-33)

Developing Agency NAVAIRSYSCOM (PMA202)

Training Agency CINCLANTFLT

CINCPACFLT

CNET

NOMI

Training Support Agency NAVAIRSYSCOM (PMA205)

Manpower and Personnel Mission Sponsor CNO (N12)

NAVPERSCOM (PERS-4, PERS-404)

Director of Naval Training CNO (N7)

Commander, Reserve Program Manager COMNAVAIRESFOR (N-711)

Marine Corps Force Structure MCCDC (C53)

D. SYSTEM DESCRIPTION

1. Operational Uses. ALSS are composed of specialized clothing and equipment designed to permit aircrew personnel (i.e., Pilots, Naval Flight Officers, and Enlisted Aircrewmen) to function within their flight environment, safely escape from a disabled aircraft, survive after escaping the aircraft, and assist with the rescue effort. Various combinations of ALSS are employed on every Navy and Marine Corps aircraft, depending on the aircraft type, mission, and flight environment.

The NCE aircrew protective assembly is a system of specialized garments and equipment that provide an interface between the pilot and the aircraft. The NCE has been designed to significantly reduce the adverse effects of excessive, sustained, and rapid onset High Positive Acceleration (+Gz) forces. Other new systems include:

    • CWU-79/P PAESS
    • A/P22P-7(V) Quick Donning Flyer's Anti-Exposure Apparel Assembly CWU-60/P
    • AN/URT-140 Radio Beacon Set
    • AN/PRC-149 Radio Set
    • ALEPV
    • MBU-23(V)/P Enhanced Pressure-Demand Oxygen Mask
    • FLU-8B/P Automatic Inflation Device
    • LPU-32/P Life Preserver Assembly
    • LPU-33/P LPFC
    • LPU-34/P LPFC
    • LRU-30/A MPLR
    • LRU-31/A MPLR
    • LRU-32/A MPLR
    • SRU-40/P HABD
    • JSAM
    • JPACE
    • IHMDSS
    • OBOGGS
    • OBIGGS

2. Foreign Military Sales. Information concerning Foreign Military Sales (FMS) and other procurements may be obtained by contacting the Aircrew Systems, Program Manager, Air (PMA) 202.

E. DEVELOPMENTAL TEST AND OPERATIONAL TEST

1. Developmental Test

a. Navy Combat Edge. Developmental Test (DT)-IIB for the NCE was conducted from June 1994 to April 1995 at Naval Air Warfare Center Aircraft Division (NAWCAD) Patuxent River, Maryland. DT-IIC was conducted at NAWCAD Patuxent River in June 1995 and was completed in August 1995. NAWCAD Warminster, Pennsylvania, personnel conducted operation and maintenance training for DT and pre-Operational Test (OT) personnel prior to NCE testing.

b. Joint Protective Aircrew Ensemble. JPACE DT-I was completed in first quarter Fiscal Year (FY) 00. DT-IIA is scheduled to begin in fourth quarter FY00. DT-IIB is scheduled to begin in fourth quarter FY01. DT-IIC is scheduled to begin in third quarter FY02 in conjunction with the Air Warrior survival vest program OT. DT-IID is scheduled to begin in third quarter FY03 in conjunction with the JSAM OT.

2. Operational Test

Navy Combat Edge. NCE OT-1A, OT-1B, and OT-1C were completed at the following locations:

    • Naval Air Station (NAS) Oceana, Virginia Beach, Virginia
    • NAS Lemoore, California
    • Marine Corps Air Station (MCAS) Beaufort, South Carolina
    • MCAS Miramar, San Diego, California

OT-IIA was conducted from July through August 1995 at NAWCAD Patuxent River. OT-IIB began in October 1995 and was completed in February 1996. OT-IIB was conducted by VX-9. Operational Evaluation personnel received operation and maintenance training from NAWCAD Warminster personnel.

F. AIRCRAFT AND/OR EQUIPMENT/SYSTEM/SUBSYSTEM REPLACED. Various Anti-Gravity (G) systems, including Anti-G garments and hardware currently used by aircrew personnel in high-performance fighter-attack aircraft, will be replaced by the NCE.

NEW

REPLACED

CRU-103/P G-Compensated Oxygen Regulator (part of the NCE system)

CRU-79/P, CRU-82/P, and CRU-88/P

AN/URT-140 Radio Beacon Set

AN/URT-33A and AN/PRT-5

AN/PRC-149 Radio Set

AN/PRC-90-2, AN/PRC-112, and AN/PRC-125

LPU-32/P Life Preserver Assembly

LPP-1/-1A and LPU-30/P

LPU-33/P Low-Profile Floatation Collars

LPU-23/P series

LPU-34/P Low-Profile Floatation Collars

LPU-21/P series

FLU-8B/P Automatic Inflation Device

FLU-8A/P

LRU-30/A Multi-Place Life Rafts

LRU-12/A and LRU-13/A

LRU-31/A Multi-Place Life Rafts

LRU-14(A)/A

LRU-32/A Multi-Place Life Rafts

LRU-15/A

CSU-13B/P Anti-G Garment

CSU-15/P

MBU-23(V)/P Enhanced Pressure-Demand Oxygen Mask

MBU-5/P

G. DESCRIPTION OF NEW DEVELOPMENT

1. Functional Description. For the purpose of this NTSP, all ALSS clothing and equipment have been divided into functional groups and are described below. All ALSS garments and protective devices are available in a variety of sizes to ensure a proper fit.

a. A/P22P-16 Navy Combat Edge. The NCE is an integrated aircrew flight ensemble designed to increase protection from the physiological hazards associated with +Gz forces. During exposure to +Gz forces, blood pooling in the lower portions of the body deprives the brain of an adequate supply of oxygenated blood and causes a loss of vision followed by a loss of consciousness. The NCE provides a Pressure Breathing for G (PBG) system for protection against the effects of positive acceleration (+4 to +9G) at altitudes up to 50,000 feet. The basic NCE concept is an adaptation of an advanced technology system developed by the United States Air Force (USAF), modified with Navy unique features compatible with current life support, survival, and rescue equipment. The anti-G valve system installed in the aircraft senses the onset of positive G-forces and automatically provides pressurized air to the anti-G garment and oxygen regulator. Regulated oxygen is then supplied to the NCE assembly equipment to provide for vest and helmet bladder inflation and positive pressure breathing. The NCE components described below will be integrated with other protective features of current ALSS equipment to achieve the full combat potential of the weapon system. The NCE is currently programmed for use only in the F/A-18 aircraft.

(1) HGU-87/P22P-16 Aircrew Protective Helmet Assembly. The HGU-87/P22P-16 is a modified HGU-68/P tactical aircraft helmet upgraded with a helmet bladder assembly. The assembly includes an inflatable occipital bladder that connects to the oxygen mask breathing hose. The occipital bladder automatically inflates with the onset of positive G-forces to a pressure equal to the mask pressure, thereby tightening the mask to the face to prevent leakage.

(2) HGU-89/P22P-16 Aircrew Protective Helmet Assembly. The HGU-89/P22P-16 is a modified HGU-85(V)/P. This modification incorporates the same bladder assembly as the HGU-87/P22P-16 helmet, and also provides for the use of MXU-810/U Night Vision System. It can be modified to accommodate the AN/AVS-9 Night Vision Image Intensifier Set (NVIIS).

(3) MBU-24/P22P-16 Oxygen Mask. The NCE uses the MBU-24/P22P-16 Oxygen Mask, which is designed to provide gaseous oxygen for breathing and inflation of the occipital bladder while maintaining face seal integrity under positive pressure breathing conditions. The mask assembly incorporates a separate inhalation and exhalation valve design that requires the breathing hose to be offset from the center of the mask. A compensation tube interconnects the inhalation and exhalation valves and directs a portion of the inhalation pressure to the underside of the exhalation valve plate, keeping the exhalation valve shut during inhalation. In addition to the inhalation and exhalation valves, the mask assembly consists of a silicone facepiece and associated hardshell, microphone and amplifier, hoses, retention straps, and offset bayonet connectors that attach the MBU-24/P22P-16 to the HGU-87/P22P-16 helmet assembly. A bladder supply hose connects the mask assembly to the occipital bladder installed inside the HGU-87(V)/P22P-16 helmet.

(4) CSU-21/P22P-16 Counter-Pressure Vest. The CSU-21/P22P-16 Counter-Pressure Vest connects with the chest-mounted CRU-103/P G-Compensated Oxygen Breathing Regulator. The vest's primary function is to externally balance the internal chest cavity pressure associated with Assisted Positive Pressure Breathing (APPB) and PBG. External counter pressure is necessary to reduce the risk of lung damage and to aid in exhalation. The CRU-103/P supplies regulated oxygen at a predetermined schedule to inflate the vest under +Gz force conditions. A flame resistant cloth outer shell houses a pneumatic bladder and incorporates a front slide fastener closure to provide easy donning and doffing, and laces to allow sufficient adjustment for correct fit. The vest fill-dump valve maintains the pressure differential between the vest and the mask at less than four inches of water at inspiratory pause.

(5) CRU-103/P G-Compensated Oxygen Breathing Regulator. The CRU-103/P is an automatic, positive pressure breathing type regulator that provides on-demand Aviator's Breathing Oxygen (ABO) to the aircrew via the MBU-24/P22P-16 oxygen mask. The regulator incorporates a pressure-proportioning valve that receives pressure signals from the G valve outlet via a sensing line and delivers pressure to the mask, mask tensioning occipital bladders, and counter-pressure vest. Designed to interface with either the OEAS or Liquid Oxygen (LOX) systems, the CRU-103/P will replace the CRU-79/P, CRU-82/P, and CRU-88/P miniature oxygen regulators through attrition, and is compatible with the MBU-12/P series and MBU-23/P22P-16 oxygen masks.

(6) CSU-20/P22P-16 Cutaway Anti-G Garment. The CSU-20/P22P-16 Cutaway Anti-G Garment is used to pressurize the lower torso area. The CSU-20/P22P-16 is similar to the CSU-13B/P Anti-G Suit, except that it provides a 40 percent increase in leg and abdomen bladder coverage to further aid in preventing blood pooling in the legs. It has a flame resistant cloth outer shell which houses a bladder, is cut away at the groin and knees, and has waist and inner-leg slide fasteners, adjustment lacing with covers, and leg pockets with slide fastener closures. The lower garment bladder inflates automatically to a pressure determined by the automatic anti-G suit pressure regulating valve installed aboard the aircraft. A G-sensing line located between the anti-G garment hose quick connect and the G-compensated oxygen-breathing regulator provides the pneumatic signal to the regulator that enables the NCE system to operate. The regulator responds to the signal and delivers the appropriate output pressures for aircraft applied Gs. The bladder, when inflated, restricts the downward flow of blood to the waist and feet, thereby lessening the effect of blood pooling.

(7) TTU-551/E Leakage Tester. The TTU-551/E Leakage Tester is a self-contained portable unit for performing operational leak tests of the HGU-87/P22P-16 and HGU-89/P22P-16 Helmet Assemblies, and the CSU-21/P22P-16 Counter Pressure Vest. Regulated low-pressure oxygen is used by the Leakage Tester to evaluate the operational integrity of these devices.

b. CSU-15/P and CSU-13B/P Anti-G Garments. Anti-G Garments are designed to provide protection against the high G-forces experienced in high-performance aircraft. An Anti-G garment consists of a fire-resistant cloth outer shell that houses a bladder. As G-forces increase, the bladder inflates to pressures that are predetermined in an automatic valving system installed in the aircraft. The inflated bladder restricts the flow of blood downward to the aircrewman's waist and feet, thereby lessening the effects of blackout. Anti-G garments are used by aircrew personnel operating EA-6B, F/A-18, AV-8B, F-14, T-2, TA-4, T-38, T-45, and F-5 aircraft. CSU-13B/P garments are replacing the CSU-15/P garments through attrition.

c. Anti-Exposure Clothing. Anti-Exposure Clothing is designed to protect aircrew personnel and passengers from exposure to cold weather and/or water conditions in the event of immersion. Anti-exposure clothing is used by the aircrew personnel of all Navy and Marine Corps aircraft operating in geographic areas that pose a potential threat of exposure.

(1) A/P22P-6 Series Constant Wear Anti-Exposure Assembly. The typical A/P22P-6 Series Constant Wear Anti-Exposure Assembly consists of a waterproof CWU-62/P series outer garment with permanently attached waterproof socks worn over a one-piece liner and cold weather undergarments to provide thermal protection. A CWU-27/P flyer's coverall is worn over the assembly with an inflatable hood and mittens stowed in the pockets.

(2) CWU-79/P Passenger Anti-Exposure Survival System. The CWU-79/P PAESS, which comprises the A/P22P-17 Anti-Exposure Apparel Assembly, is designed to provide cold weather and/or water protection for non-combat equipped passengers. The ensemble will be used for all passengers on Carrier Onboard Delivery (COD) and Vertical Onboard Delivery (VOD) aircraft on flights over water or where cold climatic conditions could be hazardous or fatal should emergency egress be necessary. The suit is a modified size-12 CWU-62A/P Anti-Exposure Coverall. The CWU-79/P has an attached HGU-32/P Hood and there are adjustment straps that enable the coverall to fit passengers of various sizes. HAU-12/P Anti-Exposure Mittens are included in a stowage pocket on the right thigh and CWU-75 Anti-Exposure Socks are attached as an integral part of the assembly.

(3) A/P22P-7(V) Quick Donning Flyers Anti-Exposure Apparel Assembly CWU-60/P. The A/P22P-7(V) Quick Donning Flyers Anti-Exposure Apparel Assembly is an emergency use assembly designed to keep the wearer warm and dry. The complete assembly provides protection from the thermal effects of cold water immersion in the event of emergency over water aircraft egress. The assembly consists of underclothing, the CWU-45/P Cold Weather Flyer's Jacket, CWU-18/P Cold Weather Trousers, CWU-60/P Quick Donning Anti-Exposure Coverall, CMU-21/P22P-7(V) modified Survival Vest, LPU-27/P22P-7(V) Life Preserver, HGU-32/P Anti-Exposure Hood, and HGU-47(V)4/P or (V)2/P Helmet. The jacket and trousers provide thermal insulation for winter flights over land and water and can be worn under the CWU-60/P Coverall in an emergency.

d. Aviators' Clothing. Aviators' clothing is designed for wear by aircrew personnel as outer garments during flight operations in any military aircraft. Aviators' clothing consists of safety boots, coveralls, gloves, jackets, cold weather trousers, and HGU-4/P Sunglasses. Aircrew safety boots are high-top style with steel toes and are made of leather with fuel-resistant soles. Coveralls and gloves are made of fire-resistant Nomex material. The jacket is available in leather or nylon. Cold weather trousers are constructed of insulated nylon. Aviators' clothing is manufactured in different weights to ensure adequate protection for a wide range of temperatures and weather conditions.

e. Breathing Masks

(1) Quick Donning Oxygen and Smoke Masks. The MBU-10/P Quick Donning Oxygen Mask and two models of Full Face Oxygen and Smoke Masks are designed to dispense gaseous oxygen from a demand type regulator, and provide protection from smoke, carbon monoxide, and other incapacitating gasses. These masks are employed by aircrew personnel aboard C-130, E-6A, and P-3C aircraft.

The MBU-10/P consists of a suspension assembly and an oxygen mask assembly. The hanging suspension holder is mounted in the aircraft to facilitate stowage, a suspension assembly that incorporates a bracket assembly, cushions, straps, retention assemblies, and yoke assembly. The oxygen mask assembly is of a hard shell and molded rubber construction that incorporates the microphone, valve assembly, cord and snap assembly, connector, combination inhalation-exhalation valve, hose, cable guides and clamps, and a cable and plug assembly.

The full face oxygen and smoke masks consist of a molded rubber faceplate with microphone cavity, plastic lens, inhalation valves, exhalation valve, molded rubber headstrap assembly, and a delivery hose with communications leads. The delivery hose for the MIL-M-19417B type mask is covered with knitted tubular polyamide and the communication cable is molded into the hose with leads extending for attachment for the mask-mounted microphone. The delivery hose for the part number 651-469 type mask is made of flexible black silicon and has an external communications lead coiled around it following the convolutions of the hose. Both masks utilize the MC-3A Connector to connect with the aircraft's oxygen system, and may be worn with earphones or with a protective helmet.

(2) MBU-12/P Pressure-Demand Oxygen Mask. The MBU-12/P Pressure-Demand Oxygen Mask is designed to be worn over the face forming a seal on the cheeks, over the bridge of the nose, and under the chin. The mask is designed for use with a regulator that provides ABO upon demand at a pressure schedule dependent on the altitude. The mask may also be used with continuous flow bailout or walk-around oxygen sources. The mask provides facial protection from projectiles and fire as well as being qualified for depths up to 16-feet under water, and permits utilization of the valsalva maneuver to equalize pressure in the middle ear during descent.

The basic MBU-12/P subassembly is a lightweight, low profile, pressure-demand type oxygen mask. The mask features an integral pliable silicone face piece and polysulphonate hard shell. The mask also has a combination inhalation-exhalation valve and a flexible silicone hose. The typical mask assembly contains offset bayonets for attaching the mask to the helmet, a connector used to attach the mask to the regulator or walk around units or a regulator used to control the flow of oxygen to the mask, the appropriate communications cables to connect the mask to the aircraft intercommunications system, and a microphone and amplifier. Adding or removing major components to and from the basic MBU-12/P Oxygen Mask subassembly configures six variations of the mask to obtain the desired configuration, which depends on the aircrew communication equipment and oxygen requirements in specific types of aircraft. Aircraft applications include the F-14, F-16, F/A-18 (without NCE installed), AV-8B, S-3, EA-6B, E-2C, C-2A, KC-130, T-2, TA-4, T-34, and T-45, and is being evaluated for use in the MV-22.

(3) MBU-23(V)/P Enhanced Pressure-Demand Oxygen Mask. The MBU-23(V)/P series Enhanced Pressure-Demand Oxygen Mask is a low profile pressure demand oxygen mask and was developed for Non-Positive Pressure Breathing for G (Non-PPB) applications in aircraft not equipped with the NCE system. The mask was designed as an alternative solution for personnel having problems wearing the MBU-12/P oxygen mask and as a replacement for the MBU-5/P Oxygen Mask. The basic mask configuration is nearly identical to the NCE MBU-24(V)P22P-16 Oxygen Mask except that it does not include a bladder supply hose to connect the mask assembly to the NCE helmet occipital bladder. Individual configurations of the MBU-23(V)/P series were designed to meet aircrew communication equipment and oxygen requirements in specific types of aircraft. Aircraft applications include the F-14, F-16, F/A-18 (without NCE installed), AV-8B, S-3, EA-6B, E-2C, C-2A, T-2, TA-4, T-34, and T-45.

f. A/P22P-9( ) (V) Helicopter Aircrew Chemical Biological Radiological Protective Clothing

(1) Chemical Biological Radiological Protective Clothing. Chemical Biological Radiological (CBR) Protective Clothing provides protection against chemical and/or biological warfare agents. It includes the A/P23P-14A(V) CBR Respirator Assembly (Helo-Upgrade) which is composed of the MCK-3A/P Mask with nose occluder, the Lower Assembly including a pusher fan, and the A/P375-1 Intercom Set. The Helo-Upgrade is the currently deployed and issued configuration for the Helicopter community, and is being evaluated for use in the MV-22. A new and improved Respirator Assembly, referred to as CBR-Non-Developmental Item (NDI), is the A/P22P-14(V) Respirator Assembly, and it comes in four variants, five sizes for each variant. The CBR-NDI Respirator Assembly is Navy unique. The clothing ensemble provides aircrew personnel with a blown filtered air supply.

(2) Chemical Biological Radiological Protective Masks. The MCK-3/P -3A/P CBR Protective Masks are designed to provide helicopter aircrew with head, eye, and respiratory protection against the toxic and lethal effects of chemical or biological agents and radioactive fallout. The assembly provides above-the-neck protection during in-flight and ground operations and fits beneath standard issue helmets and protective equipment with a minimum of interference. The mask is designed for wear in conjunction with below-the-neck protective clothing. The Special Missions Manual, NAVAIR 13-1-6.10, describes in detail the required CBR clothing and equipment for each type of special mission.

The major components of a typical MCK-3( )/P series Protective Mask are the hood and faceplate. The hood, made of impervious bromo-butyl rubber, covers the entire head and extends down past the neck. A molded, one-piece polycarbonate faceplate is sealed into the front of the hood. The upper part is transparent and forms the optical area. The lower part is shaped to fit the wearer's lower face. Included on the faceplate is a nose occluder, toggle harness, anti-drown connector, drinking tube, microphone assembly, and valves and adapters required to connect the mask to portable oxygen, ventilators, or aircraft as required.

(3) Joint Service Aircrew Mask. The JSAM is currently in acquisition Phase II (Engineering and Manufacturing Development) and has reached Acquisition Milestone II. JSAM is designed as a Joint Service program to replace all existing CBR and oxygen masks for all fixed and rotary wing aircraft in all services. Specific details regarding this program will be included in a forthcoming Joint System Training Plan (JSTRAP) that is currently in development.

(4) Below-The-Neck Protective Clothing. The Below-the-Neck (BTN) portion of the A/P22P-9( ) (V) Protective Assemblies provide chemical and biological agent protection for helicopter aircrew personnel. The components that comprise the BTN protective ensemble are chemical liner, cotton undergarments, chemical protective socks, disposable footwear covers, aircrew cape, chemical protective gloves, and chemical glove inserts.

The one-piece chemical liner is made of a nylon viscous non-woven fabric. The fabric's outer surface is treated with a fluorochemical liquid repellent finish, which repels liquid agents. The fabric's inner surface is coated with activated charcoal, which absorbs chemical vapors. The cotton undershirt and drawers are worn under the chemical liner to prevent skin irritation from the charcoal lining and to minimize the amount of perspiration contamination to the chemical liner. The chemical protective socks are made of four-millimeter polyethylene. They are vapor agent impermeable to protect the feet from chemical agents. The footwear covers are worn over the flyer's boots to protect aircrew personnel from contamination en route between the shelter and the aircraft. The footwear covers must be removed before entering the aircraft. The aircrew cape is a large clear disposable plastic bag worn over the body. The cape protects the user from liquid contamination en route to the aircraft and must be removed before entering the aircraft. The chemical protective gloves are made of butyl to protect the hands from chemical agents. Chemical glove inserts are made of 100% cotton knit and must be worn under the chemical protective gloves to absorb perspiration.

(5) Joint Protective Aircrew Crew Ensemble. The JPACE is currently in Phase I (Program Definition and Risk Reduction) of the Weapon System Acquisition Process. The Acquisition Milestone II Decision and entry into Phase II (Engineering and Manufacturing Development) is anticipated in June 2000. JPACE is an integrated aircrew ensemble that addresses the thermal stress experienced by aircrew, provides Chemical-Biological protection, and reduces the bulk and weight of current ensembles. There are two basic designs currently being evaluated:

    1. An Under Garment/Outer Shell combination
    2. A one piece Chemical Protective Coverall (CPC) that would additionally replace the CWU-27/P duty uniform aircrew flight suit

JPACE is designed as a Joint Service program to replace all existing aircrew CBR BTN ensembles for all fixed and rotary wing aircraft in all services. Specific details regarding JPACE will be included in a forthcoming JSTRAP that is currently in development.

g. Ejection Seats. The five primary models of ejection seats installed in Navy and Marine Corps aircraft are the Douglas ESCAPAC Model Series, North American LS-1, the Martin-Baker MK-GRU-7 series, SJU-4/5/6 series, and the SJU-17(V) NACES. Although considered a part of ALSS, ejection seats are beyond the scope of this NTSP. Specific information regarding ejection seats and associated training tracks for AME personnel may be found in the individual aircraft NTSPs as referenced in section M of this document. Refer to NTSP A-50-8517C/D for additional information regarding the NACES ejection seat program. Aircraft application by type is listed in the following table:

EJECTION SEAT MODEL

AIRCRAFT APPLICATION

ESCAPAC Series

S-3; TA-4J

LS-1

T-2

MK-GRU-7A

F-14A/B

MK-GRUEA-7

EA-6B

SJU-4A

AV-8B

SJU-5A

F/A-18B (back), F/A-18A/C

SJU-6A

F/A-18B (front)

SJU-17(V) NACES

F-14D; T-45A, F/A-18C/D/E/F

h. Emergency Radios

(1) AN/URT-140 Radio Beacon Set. The AN/URT-140 is a compact, non-combat, emergency location beacon utilizing an advanced multi-moded waveform for improved Search and Rescue (SAR) position location. It is capable of both manual and automatic activation, and timed and continuous operation while transmitting on the standard waveform that increases detection and location by ground and airborne SAR teams. It will replace the AN/URT-33A and AN/PRT-5 through attrition.

(2) AN/URT-33A Radio Beacon Set. The AN/URT-33A is a battery-powered emergency radio beacon transmitter that, when activated, transmits a tone-modulated radio frequency signal from a downed aircrew member to the rescue party. The hand-held AN/URT-33A is housed in a watertight case. It has both a flexible and a telescoping antenna. Either an automatic deployment device or a manual on-off switch can activate the set. The AN/URT-33A is employed in Seat Survival Kits for ejection seat use, and in multi-place life rafts for non-ejection seat use.

(3) AN/PRT-5 Radio Transmitting Ultra High Frequency Set. The AN/PRT-5 is an emergency radio transmitter that transmits a tone-modulated radio frequency signal in both the High Frequency (HF) and Ultra High Frequency (UHF) ranges. The set has an inflatable float assembly that allows it to float at sea or sit upright on land. The battery pack is designed to provide 72-hours of continuous operation. The AN/PRT-5 is battery-powered and contains a UHF antenna, HF antenna, power switch, and float assembly that is inflated by a Carbon Dioxide (CO2) cartridge or mouth valve. The top section of the transmitter set contains the electronics package and the lower part is the battery case. The AN/PRT-5 is employed in large multi-place life rafts only.

(4) AN/PRC-149 Radio Set. The AN/PRC-149 is a compact, light-weight, handheld, half-duplex, non-combat personal emergency communication radio and emergency location beacon transmitter that includes an advanced triple frequency multi-moded waveform for improved beacon position determination by SAR forces. For training purposes, the AN/PRC-149 will be available in a training configuration that will be used as a single frequency (245.0 MHz) beacon and voice transmitter. In addition, the radio can be outfitted with a C-XXX/PRC-149 Swimmer's Control Unit. This allows SAR teams free use of their hands while operating the radio. It will replace the AN/PRC-90-2, AN/PRC-112, and AN/PRC-125 through attrition.

(5) AN/PRC-90-2 Survival Beacon. The AN/PRC-90-2 Survival Beacon is a dual-channel personal emergency rescue transmitter, used principally for two-way voice or modulated Continuous Wave (CW) communications between a downed aircrew member and a rescue aircraft. It also contains a swept-frequency homing beacon signal to guide rescue efforts. The hand-held AN/PRC-90-2 is battery-powered and contains a flexible antenna, interchangeable telescopic antenna, functional switch, CW button for Morse code, volume control, and earphone. The AN/PRC-90-2 is stowed in the SV-2B Survival Vest or in the Torso Harness when modified with survival pockets.

(6) AN/PRC-112 Radio Set. The AN/PRC-112 Radio Set is a UHF Amplitude Modulation (AM) voice radio with five operator selected frequencies (three are preset frequencies and two are operator-selectable). One of the programmable frequencies is normally used for Distance Measuring Equipment (DME) functions. DME permits an AN/ARS-6 equipped helicopter to query the AN/PRC-112 and receive a cockpit readout that provides an approximate direction and distance to the survivor. The AN/PRC-112 operates overtly by radiating a beacon signal with a range of approximately three times that of the AN/PRC-90-2. When placed in the transponder mode, the radio set operates covertly in conjunction with AN/ARS-6 SAR avionics equipment, providing bearing and range information to SAR forces. Powered by a lithium sulfur dioxide battery, it provides superior performance in cold weather operations. A new version of the AN/PRC-112 has been developed through the incorporation of Global Positioning System (GPS) modules. Modified radios are labeled AN/PRC-112B and are currently in production. The AN/PRC-112 is stowed in the SV-2B Survival Vest or in the Torso Harness when modified with survival pockets, and is currently limited in use to forward-deployed troops and cold weather operations.

(7) AN/CRT-3 Series Radio Set. The AN/CRT-3 series Radio Sets are emergency transmitting systems that enable downed aircrewmen to send an automatic distress signal, or by using a manual key, to send coded signals to rescue parties. The AN/CRT-3 consists of a hand-generated, self-contained power supply and keying assembly. Also included are a three-position selector switch, push-button telegraph key, signal lamp and jack, antenna assembly, hand crank (for the generator), balloon and kite (to raise the antenna wire), and a hydrogen generator (to inflate the balloon). All items are packed into a floatable equipment container. The AN/CRT-3 differs from other survival radio applications in that it is carried in SAR aircraft, and dropped by parachute to downed aircrew personnel, instead of being immediately available as a part of their survival item kits.

i. Helmets and Eye Protection

(1) Helmets. The helmet provides face, eye, ear, and head protection during normal flight operations, in-flight buffeting, and emergency landings. The helmet is designed to distribute impact forces over the entire head and absorb these forces so that a minimum amount of impact reaches the wearer.

(a) HGU-68/P Helmet. The typical HGU-68/P series Helmet consists of an outer shell assembly, form-fit or Thermoplastic Liner (TPL), visor, and communications system. The outer shell assembly is constructed of Kevlar and resin. A neoprene rubber beading provides protection from the shell edges. An adjustable boom type microphone is attached to the lower left side of the shell for use in non-tactical aircraft. The optional form-fit liner is constructed of polystyrene backing, a leather covering, and a comfort pad. The TPL assembly is a lightweight inner liner that consists of a five-layer, preformed plastic assembly and a removable, washable cloth cover. The earcup assemblies are made of molded plastic-formed cavities housing earphones that provide intercommunications within a sound attenuating environment. An ear seal is attached to the flat side of the earcup to provide comfort and an acoustic seal to the wearer. A visor assembly is installed on the upper front section of the outer shell. Single and dual lens visors are used with the lens lowered into a position over the eyes by a manual adjustment screw. The helmet assembly is secured to the head by a chin-nape strap. Cables attached to the helmet connect the earphones and boom microphone assembly to the aircraft's communications system or to the oxygen mask. Adapter plates are mounted on the outer shell to accommodate special equipment such as telescopic sight units and night vision systems. Individual configurations of the HGU-68/P series were designed to meet aircrew communication equipment in specific types of aircraft. Aircraft applications include the F-14, F-16, F/A-18 (without NCE installed), AV-8B, S-3, EA-6B, E-2C, C-2A, T-2, TA-4, T-34, and T-45.

(b) HGU-84/P Replacement Helicopter Helmet. The typical HGU-84/P series helmet features a lightweight outer shell assembly, constructed of a multi-layer mixed composite of graphite fabric and ballistic nylon fabric, with the helmet edge trimmed for optimal peripheral vision. They afford enhanced stability and comfort through the use of an integrated chin-nape strap and a TPL, are compatible for use with the AN/AVS-6 NVIIS, the MCK-3A/P CBR Protective Mask, and the MBU-17(V)2/P Oxygen Mask. Aircraft applications include all models of the H-1, H-2, H-3, H-46, H-53, H-57, and H-60; the HGU-82/P is being evaluated for use in the MV-22.

(2) Advanced Laser Eye Protection Visor. The ALEPV is being developed as a day and night usable, low energy visor for use by fixed and rotary wing aircrew in a fixed, multiple wavelength laser threat environment. There are three configurations of the ALEPV: EEU-12/P for all rotary wing aircraft, EEU-13/P for the HGU-87/P and HGU-89/P, and the EEU-14/P for the HGU-68/P. The ALEPV is also compatible with cockpit displays, night vision systems, and fire control systems. The ALEPV will be consumable; organizational level maintenance will be limited to cleaning and replacement.

(3) Joint Helmet Mounted Cueing System. The JHMCS is a helmet mounted cueing and display system which, in conjunction with the AIM-9X Sidewinder missile system, provides a high off-boresight capability for Navy and USAF tactical fighter aircraft. This capability gives the warfighter first-look, first-shot, air-to-air, and air-to-ground weapons and sensor cueing that allows eyes out of the cockpit targeting within the visual range arena. The JHMCS has produced major improvements in pilot situational awareness, with good overall system accuracy, faster target acquisition, and less exposure time. An Initial NTSP for the JHMCS is currently being developed by AIR 3.4.1.1.

(4) Integrated Helmet Mounted Display and Sighting System. The AH-1Z incorporates an IHMDSS featuring dual Cathode Ray Tube (CRT) projection onto the visor. The IHMDSS can display information from all aircraft sensors including the helmet's detachable low light image intensification (I2) camera. The IHMDSS allows flight instrument and situational symbology to be overlaid on the projected image.

j. Life Rafts. Life rafts are designed for use by aircrew members and passengers forced down at sea. They can also be used on land to ford rivers or as shelters. One-man life rafts are most commonly used by aircrewmen in ejection seat-type aircraft, in which case the life raft is an integral part of a soft or hard-type survival kit. Larger life rafts are normally stowed in readily accessible areas inside the aircraft fuselage in compartments specifically designed for that purpose. Some life rafts automatically inflate upon deployment.

Typical life raft assemblies used in military aircraft consist of a one, four, seven, twelve, or twenty-man life raft and an inflation assembly (CO2 cylinder with inflation valve). MPLR assemblies consist of eight, twelve, and twenty-man configurations. The body of the life raft is comprised of an oval flotation tube constructed of rubberized fabric and an inflatable or non-inflatable floor. The flotation tube may be divided internally by vertical bulkheads to form separate inflatable compartments. The number of bulkheads required is determined by the size and load capacity. Each compartment has an inflation assembly consisting of a CO2 cylinder and a topping-off tube. Survival equipment is stowed in accessory containers and supply pockets attached to the main tube. A sea anchor is attached to the bow of the raft.

(1) LR-1 Life Raft Assembly. The LR-1 is a one-man life raft utilized with various soft and hard type survival kits. It is intended for use by aircrew personnel forced down at sea, and can also be used when forced down over land for fording rivers and streams or as shelter. The LR-1 is inflated either manually by pulling the inflation assembly actuating lanyard, or automatically by gravity drop on Seat Survival Kit actuation. The LR-1 is used in the C-2, E-2, T-2, T-34, T-39, KC-130, A-4, F-14, F/A-18, AV-8, and EA-6B aircraft, and all helicopters except the AH-1. The LR-1 life raft will be replaced through attrition with the LRU-18/U One-Man Vee Bottom Life Raft in Helicopter Backpack Assemblies.

(2) LRU-18/U Life Raft Assembly. The LRU-18/U is intended for use by aircrew personnel forced down at sea, and can also be used when forced down over land for fording rivers and streams or as shelter. It is a lightweight one-man life raft designed to replace the bulkier and heavier LR-1 in certain applications. The LRU-18/U is mandatory for use in the SRU-37/P Helicopter Backpack for use in all helicopters, and in the SKK-9 Survival Kit Container Assembly for use in E-2C aircraft as part of the A/P22P-11 Crew Backpack.

(3) LRU-23/P Life Raft Assembly. The LRU-23/P is a one-man life raft intended for use by aircrew personnel forced down at sea, is designed to provide insulation against low sea and air temperatures, and is stowed in individual seat survival kits. The components are constructed of dark blue single-ply, polyurethane-coated, nylon fabric and are assembled using radio frequency welding techniques. This type of fabric and construction reduces the weight and bulk of the life raft, enhancing its adaptability for use in seat survival kits. The LRU-23/P life raft is installed in seat survival kits used in F-14D, F/A-18, and T-45 aircraft equipped with SJU-17(V)( )/A NACES ejection seats.

(4) LRU-12/A (MK-4) Life Raft Assembly. The LRU-12/A (formerly MK-4) is a four-man inflatable life raft intended for use by aircrew personnel forced down at sea. It is stowed in a readily accessible area inside the aircraft fuselage. The LRU-12/A in its life raft compartment installation is automatically inflated and ejected after the life raft compartment door has been released. The droppable configuration is inflated by pulling the inflation assembly ripcord handle. The four-man life rafts are installed in C-2 and H-3 aircraft, are programmed for obsolescence, and will be replaced through attrition by the LRU-30/A eight-man MPLR.

(5) LRU-13/A (MK-7) Life Raft Assembly. The LRU-13/A (formerly MK-7) is a seven-man inflatable life raft intended for use by aircrew personnel forced down at sea. It is stowed in a readily accessible area inside the aircraft fuselage on all applicable aircraft except the C-2 where it is stowed in the life raft compartment. The LRU-13/A in its life raft compartment installation is automatically inflated and ejected after the life raft compartment door has been released. The droppable configuration is inflated by pulling the inflation assembly ripcord handle. LRU-13/A seven-man life rafts are installed in C-2, C-130, H-3, H-46, H-53, H-57, HH-60H, and P-3 aircraft. The LRU-13/A is being replaced through attrition by the LRU-30/A eight-man MPLR.

(6) LRU-14(A)/A (MK-12A-1) Life Raft Assembly. The LRU-14A/A (formerly MK-12A-1) is a twelve-man inflatable life raft intended for use by aircrew personnel forced down at sea. It is stowed in a readily accessible area inside the aircraft fuselage or in an aircraft compartment designed for rafts. The LRU-14A/A in its life raft compartment installation is automatically inflated and ejected after the life raft compartment door has been released. The droppable configuration is inflated by pulling the inflation assembly ripcord handle. The LRU-14/A configuration was changed to LRU-14A/A by adding a canopy with related components and a heaving line with a pocket. LRU-14A/A twelve-man life rafts are installed in H-46A/D/E, CH-53A/D, and P-3 aircraft. The LRU-14A/A is being replaced through attrition by the LRU-31/A twelve-man MPLR.

(7) LRU-15/A (MK-20) Life Raft Assembly. The LRU-15/A (formerly MK-20) is a twenty-man inflatable life raft intended for use by aircrew personnel forced down at sea. It is stowed in a readily accessible area inside the aircraft fuselage or in an aircraft compartment designed for rafts. The LRU-15/A in its life raft compartment wing installation is automatically inflated and ejected after the life raft compartment door has been released. The droppable configuration is inflated by pulling the inflation assembly ripcord handle. A unique design feature of the LRU-15/A is that it is always right-side-up after inflation. LRU-15/A twenty-man life rafts are installed in E/K/LC-130F/G/R/Q, C-117D, C-118B, C-131F/G, and H-53A/D/E aircraft. The LRU-15/A is being replaced through attrition by the LRU-32/A twenty-man MPLR.

(8) Multi-Place Life Rafts. The MPLRs are intended for use by aircrew personnel forced down at sea. The rafts come in three configurations: eight-man LRU-30/A, twelve-man LRU-31/A, and twenty-man LRU-32/A. The MPLRs are constructed of polyurethane-coated cloth with thermobonded seams. Their design incorporates an auto-erecting canopy, auto-inflating boarding ramps, an insulating floor, and internal and external lights. The rafts are vacuum-packed and come with an accessory container capable of holding all the required USN survival items. The vacuum-packed raft rests on top of the accessory container with both the raft and accessory container contained in the carrying case. The raft is inflated by pulling the inflation assembly ripcord handle located on the end of the carrying case. The life raft, canopy, and boarding ramps fully inflate automatically. After boarding, the attached accessory container is pulled into the raft to access survival items. The MPLR is a joint tri-service program, is Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) approved, and is intended to replace all multi-place life rafts applications through attrition in all aircraft, both fixed and rotary wing, in all services. Navy specific aircraft applications will be in accordance with applicable Naval Air Training and Operating Procedures Standardization (NATOPS) requirements.

k. Oxygen Supply Systems

(1) Liquid Oxygen Converter. The LOX Converter is designed to store and convert LOX into gaseous breathing oxygen for the aircrew's use during flight. Oxygen in its liquid state (approximately -297o F) is stored in a spherical assembly consisting of inner and outer shells separated by an annular space. The annular space is evacuated, preventing the transmittal of heat through the space. The thermos bottle effect created retards heating and eventual conversion of LOX to gaseous oxygen. Valves, tubing, and fittings incorporated in the converter assembly convert LOX on demand to gas, and direct its flow at a controlled rate to the crew for breathing. A typical LOX converter consists of a sphere assembly, build-up and vent valve, relief valve, pressure closing valve, and associated tubing and fittings.

(2) Oxygen Enriched Air System. The OEAS, formerly OBOGS, has begun to replace the LOX system in new production AV-8B, F-14D, F/A-18C/D/E/F, and T-45A aircraft. OEAS provides a continuous supply of oxygen-enriched air to the aircrew when the system is activated during aircraft engine operation. OEAS is comprised of two major equipment groups: the OEAS consisting of an oxygen concentrator, monitor, regulator; and the airframe peculiar equipment including heat exchanger, valving, plumbing, and other components crucial to integrating the system to the aircraft. Refer to the OEAS NTSP, N88-NTSP-A-50-8603C/D for additional information.

(3) Onboard Oxygen Gas Generating System/Onboard Inert Gas Generating System. The OBOGGS/OBIGGS uses a common valve assembly and control scheme to cycle engine bleed air through separate beds of molecular sieve, one set to produce breathing oxygen for four crewmembers and one set to produce nitrogen enriched air to inert fuel tanks. This system also includes a solid state oxygen monitor to confirm performance of the system. OBOGGS/OBIGGS is currently programmed for use only in the MV-22 aircraft.

l. Oxygen Regulators

(1) Aircraft Panel-Mounted Oxygen Regulators. Panel-mounted regulators are used in conjunction with pressure breathing oxygen masks. The regulators provide 100 percent oxygen or an air-and-oxygen mixture at the correct ratio, depending on altitude. All controls and indicators necessary for the operation of the regulator are located on an illuminated panel. The controls consist of an on-off switch, flow switch, and selector switch. An oxygen flow gage and a quantity gage are also provided.

(2) Torso-Mounted Miniature Oxygen Regulators. Miniature regulators are designed for use with the MBU-14 series Oxygen Mask and are part of the oxygen system in all aircraft requiring chest-mounted regulators. The miniature regulator provides 100 percent oxygen to the aircrewman during flight. Miniature oxygen regulators weigh less than four ounces and have no operator controls or adjustments. The regulator is attached to the aircraft's oxygen supply by means of a quick disconnect hose and is mounted on the aircrewman's torso harness or survival vest. As part of an ongoing effort to standardize tactical jet ALSS, the CRU-103/P G-Compensated Oxygen Regulator will replace the CRU-79/P, CRU-82/P, and CRU-88/P Miniature Oxygen Regulators through attrition.

m. Personal Flotation Equipment. Personal Flotation Equipment (life preservers) are worn by aircrew personnel on overwater flights. In the event of bail out, ejection, or ditching, the device keeps the wearer afloat until a raft is boarded or a rescue team arrives. There are two basic models of life preservers, the LPP series for passenger use and the LPU series for continuous wear by aircrew personnel. The basic LPU series assembly consists of a two-chambered flotation assembly constructed of polychloroprene-coated nylon cloth, a casing assembly, two carbon-dioxide inflation assemblies, an oral inflation tube, and survival item pouches which contain dye markers and flares. The pouches are attached to the casing assembly with snap hooks. The dye marker and signal flares are not initially supplied and must be individually requisitioned. It weighs four pounds without survival items and provides a minimum of 65 pounds of buoyancy. LPU series life preservers configured for ejection seat use incorporate an FLU-8B/P auto-inflation device that activates upon water entry.

(1) LPP-1/1A Life Preserver Assembly. The LPP-1/1A is authorized for passengers in cargo or transport type aircraft, both fixed and rotary wing. It consists of a single compartment, yoke-type floatation assembly, a pouch and belt assembly, an inflation assembly, and a storage container, weighs approximately three pounds and provides a minimum of 29 pounds of buoyancy. The flotation assembly is constructed of polychloroprene-coated nylon cloth, and is equipped with an oral inflation valve, signal light, and whistle. The pouch and belt assembly consists of a rubber-coated nylon cloth pouch and adjustable belt, and houses the floatation assembly when not in use. The LPP-1/1A is currently programmed for obsolescence and is being replaced by the LPU-32/P.

(2) Pouch Type Life Preserver Assembly. The Pouch Type Life Preserver is authorized for all troop passengers on Marine Corps helicopters for sea survival situations. It is a standard abandon ship type life preserver used throughout the fleet, adapted for use in Marine Corps aircraft, weighs two pounds and provides a minimum of 29 pounds of buoyancy. The Pouch Type Life Preserver consists of a single compartment flotation assembly, an inflation assembly, belt, hoisting strap, and a pouch. The Pouch Type Life Preserver was introduced for use as an interim measure to fill outstanding back orders of the LPP-1/1A, and is being evaluated for replacement by the LPU-32/P.

(3) LPU-21/P Series Life Preserver Assembly. The LPU-21/P series is authorized for all aircrew personnel wearing compatible flight clothing in non-ejection seat aircraft. It is designed as a constant wear item for use with the survival vest and will not interfere with the removal of the nonintegrated parachute harness.

Modifications to the LPU-21B/P have resulted in new letter designations being assigned. Newly procured LPU-21/P series are designated LPU-21D/P and feature a heat-sealed flotation bladder assembly. The LPU-21C/P flotation assembly may be used in conjunction with the LPU-21D/P casing assembly, and is designated the LPU-21C(V)1/P in this configuration.

(4) LPU-23/P Series Life Preserver Assembly. The LPU-23/P series is authorized for all aircrew personnel in ejection seat aircraft. It is designed as a constant wear item for use with the survival vest and will not interfere with the removal of the nonintegrated parachute harness.

LPU-21/P and LPU-21A/P configured with the FLU-8B/P automatic inflation device are designated LPU-23A/P. Automatic inflation devices are not initially supplied and must be individually requisitioned. Subsequent procurements of the LPU-23/P series were designated LPU-23B/P. Newly procured LPU-23/P series are actually LPU-21D/P life preservers, which when coupled with the FLU-8B/P automatic inflation device are designated LPU-23C/P. The LPU-23B/P flotation assembly may be used in conjunction with the LPU-21C/P casing assembly, and is designated LPU-23B(V)1/P when configured as such. However, the LPU-23C/P flotation assembly may not be used with the LPU-23B/P casing assembly.

(5) LPU-27/P22P-7(V) Life Preserver Assembly. The LPU-27/P22P-7(V) is an LPU-21B/P or LPU-21C/P that has been modified in accordance with Aircrew Systems Change 523 and is not a procured item. The modification added an extension panel to increase the length of the casing webbing belt, and is designed for wear by aircrew personnel of patrol aircraft and as authorized by area type commanders. The extension panel provides the capability of wearing the life preserver with or without the anti-exposure garment.

(6) LPU-28/P and Lifesaving Systems Corporation (Part Number 482) Life Preserver Assemblies. The LPU-28/P and Lifesaving Systems Corporation (LSC) Part Number 482 are authorized for use by helicopter rescue aircrewmen during SAR, and are designed for compatibility with helicopter helmets. They provide storage and pile tape attachment points for the SDU-5/E distress light and the AN/PRC-125 radio. Both assemblies weigh a maximum of 2.5 pounds without accessories and provide a minimum of 30 pounds of buoyancy. They consist of a single compartment flotation assembly, a casing assembly, a waist belt, and a carbon dioxide inflation assembly. The LPU-28/P incorporates a diver's oral inflation valve (mouthpiece type), and a pressure relief valve. The LSC P/N 482 is a modified LPU-28/P with a standard oral inflation tube with a knurled ring locking mechanism; it does not incorporate a pressure relief valve.

(7) LPU-31/P Life Preserver Assembly. The LPU-31/P is authorized for helicopter combatant aircrewmen using the T-65 body armor. It is composed of the LPP-1/1A life preserver and a protective bladder cover, weighs approximately four pounds, and provides a minimum of 29 pounds of buoyancy. Although the LPP-1/1A is currently programmed for obsolescence through attrition, there are no current plans to replace the LPU-31/P with the LPU-32/P.

(8) LPU-32/P Life Preserver Assembly. The LPU-32/P is authorized for passengers and troops in helicopter or transport type aircraft for sea survival situations. It is designed such that one size fits all. It consists of a life preserver yoke assembly in addition to the survival items, a sea-dye marker, a whistle, and a chemlite. The yoke assembly consists of a flotation assembly, two inflators, and a casing cover assembly that includes the belt assembly and the survival items pouch. The LPU-32/P weighs approximately four pounds and provides a minimum of 40 pounds of buoyancy. The LPU-32/P replaced the LPU-30/P and is replacing the LPP-1/1A models through attrition. When either model is available, the LPU-32/P is the preferred life saving device. The LPU-30/P is no longer authorized for use in naval aircraft.

(9) LPU-33/P Low Profile Flotation Collar. The LPU-33/P LPFC is equipped with the FLU-8B/P automatic-manual inflator. It is designed as a constant wear item for use with survival vests and other aircrew equipment in aircraft equipped with ejection seat systems as a replacement for the LPU-23/P series. Weighing only 3 pounds, the LPU-33/P provides a minimum of 65 pounds of buoyancy. It consists of multiple components compactly packed into an exterior cover assembly (casing assembly). The flotation assembly consists of two independent inflatable assemblies (bladders), each with a FLU-8B/P automatic-manual inflator and an oral inflation valve. The bladders are packed inside a black cloth inflation shell. Four straps on the inflation shell pass through grommets on the exterior cover to attach the life preserver to the modified torso harness or survival vest. Two additional straps adjust a plastic buckle that snaps across the wearer's chest to keep the LPU-33/P in position when worn. A beaded handle connected to the FLU-8B/P is mounted on each side of the exterior cover to manually initiate inflation.

(10) LPU-34/P Low Profile Flotation Collar. The LPU-34/P LPFC is identical to the LPU-33/P LPFC except that it is equipped with two manually operated inflation devices. It is designed as a constant wear item for use with compatible clothing and other crew equipment in non-ejection seat fixed wing aircraft, helicopters, and the MV-22 as a replacement for the LPU-21/P series. The LPU-34/P has a zipper (slide fastener) the same color as the exterior cover to aid in distinguishing it from the LPU-33/P, which has a black zipper and is equipped with automatic inflation devices.

(11) LPU-35/P Life Preserver Assembly. The LPU-35/P is a modified LPU-21D/P and is not a procured item. The modification added an extension panel to increase the length of the waist portion of the casing assembly, and is designed for wear by aircrew personnel of non-ejection seat aircraft over cold weather flight clothing. The extension panel provides the capability of wearing the life preserver with or without the anti-exposure garment.

(12) FLU-8B/P Automatic Inflation Device. The FLU-8B/P is a sealed, cartridge actuated automatic inflation device consisting of a sensor housing and body assembly, a 35-gram CO2 cylinder, sensor plug, packaging loop, and a top and bottom gasket. The sensor housing contains an electronic circuit that initiates automatic inflation of the life preserver when immersed in fresh or salt water. Pulling on a beaded handle that is connected to each inflation device by an inflation lanyard and casing flap locking pin initiates manual inflation. Manual inflation is the primary means of actuating the inflation device, and the automatic mode is a secondary back up in the case of injured or unconscious aircrew personnel. The FLU-8B/P is only used in life preservers configured for ejection seat aircraft applications, and has replaced the FLU-8A/P through attrition.

n. Parachutes. There are two types of parachutes utilized in naval aircraft, drogue and personnel. Drogue parachutes are connected to ejection seats, provide deceleration and stabilization of the seat during the bailout trajectory, and initiate the deployment of the personnel parachute. A personnel parachute is an escape device that retards the speed of an aircrew member's descent after bailout or ejection from a disabled aircraft, allowing for a safe, controlled ground or water landing. Backpack and chest-mounted parachutes are used in aircraft that do not have ejection systems installed. Navy Egress System (NES)-type parachutes are used with ejection systems and are an integral part of the ejection seat.

There are four basic personnel parachutes used in Navy aircraft:

    • Twenty-eight foot diameter, flat, circular, nylon canopy with 28 gores (or sections)
    • Twenty-six foot diameter, conical, nylon canopy with 22 gores
    • Twenty-one foot diameter, aeroconical, nylon canopy with 20 gores
    • Seventeen foot diameter, aeroconical, nylon canopy with 20 gores

They are multi-colored with white, olive green, sand, and international orange shades, providing downed aircrew personnel camouflage in snow, forest, and desert environments, and a means to signal rescue aircraft. The basic drogue parachute system consists of two parachutes: a 22-inch diameter controller drogue and a five foot diameter stabilizer drogue, both fabricated of cotton material and interconnected by a connecting line to the apex of the personnel parachute.

The parachute assembly consists of five major components: harness, container, suspension lines, canopy, and pilot chute. The harness is an arrangement of nylon webbing and metal fittings designed to hold the parachute assembly securely to the wearer and provide a seat or sling during descent, and is an integral part of the container for backpack style parachutes. Ejection seat applications utilize the PCU-26/P, PCU-33/P, and PCU-56/P series Torso Harnesses. The container encloses the pilot chute, canopy, and suspension lines while not in use. The suspension lines are made of nylon and join the canopy to the harness. The canopy is a large round area of nylon cloth that, when inflated, slows the descent of the wearer. The pilot chute is a small parachute attached to the top of the canopy. When the parachute is used, the pilot chute accelerates the deployment of the main canopy and suspension lines. Parachutes configured for ejection seat use incorporate Parachute Harness Sensing Release Units (PHSRU), also known as the Seawater Activated Release System (SEAWARS).

(1) NC-3 Personnel Parachute Assembly. The NC-3 is a chest-type parachute with a 28-foot standard flat canopy. The harness is an integral part of the container assembly, and comes in two sizes, regular and oversize. It may also be used in-service with the Standard Soft Pack (SSP) packaged LR-1. The NC-3 is used for emergency bailout from the C-130 aircraft.

(2) NB-6 Personnel Parachute Assembly. The NB-6 is a back type parachute with a 26-foot conical canopy. The harness is an integral part of the container assembly, and comes in two sizes, regular and oversize. The addition or absence of a Model 7000 Automatic Parachute Ripcord Release and lanyard assembly makes up two additional configurations of the parachute. It may also be used in-service with the SSP packaged LR-1 or with the SP-1A Seat Pan Assembly. The NB-6 is used for emergency bailout from the T-34 aircraft.

(3) NB-7 Personnel Parachute Assembly. The NB-7 is a back type parachute with a 28-foot standard flat canopy and is designed for use with the PCU-33/P or PCU-56/P series torso harness assemblies. It is mated to a seat survival kit by a slide fastener and then installed in the aircraft seat. Two different configurations of the parachute are made through the addition or absence of SEAWARS. The NB-7 is used for emergency bailout from the E-2 aircraft.

(4) NB-8 Personnel Parachute Assembly. The NB-8 is a back type parachute with a 28-foot standard flat canopy. The harness is an integral part of the container assembly and comes in two sizes, regular and oversize. It may also be used in-service with the SSP packaged LR-1 or with the SP-1A. The NB-8 is used for emergency bailout from the C-2, C-130, P-3, and T-39 aircraft.

(5) NES-12 Personnel Parachute Assembly. The NES-12 is an ejection seat, back type parachute with a 28-foot standard flat canopy. It works in conjunction with the Douglas ESCAPAC Ejection Seat System, and is designed for use with the PCU-33/P or PCU-56/P series torso harness assemblies. It incorporates a Model 7000 Automatic Parachute Ripcord Release and lanyard assembly, a Ballistic Spreading Gun assembly, and SEAWARS. A unique feature of this parachute assembly is the use of a tri-stage external pilot parachute stowed in a pocket on the container flap. The tri-stage external pilot parachute serves the same purpose as a drogue parachute system, that of deceleration and stabilization of the seat during the bailout trajectory and to initiate the deployment of the personnel parachute. The container has two strap adapters for attachment of the seat survival kit, and in S-3 aircraft applications, a lumbar pad is used to provide back support. The NES-12 is used in S-3 and TA-4 aircraft.

(6) NES-14 Personnel Parachute Assembly. The NES-14 is an ejection seat type parachute with a 28-foot standard flat canopy. It works in conjunction with the MK-GRU-7/7A/EA7 Drogue Parachute Assemblies as part of the Martin Baker MK-GRU-7/7A/EA7 Ejection Seat Systems, is designed for use with the PCU-33/P or PCU-56/P series torso harness assemblies, and incorporates SEAWARS. The NES-14 is used in EA-6B and F-14A/B aircraft.

(7) NES-25A Personnel Parachute Assembly. The NES-25A is an ejection seat, back type parachute with a 28-foot standard flat canopy. It works in conjunction with the LS-1 Drogue Parachute Assembly as part of the North American Aviation LS-1 Ejection Seat Escape System, and is designed for use with the PCU-33/P or PCU-56/P series torso harness assemblies. It incorporates a Model 7000 Automatic Parachute Ripcord Release and lanyard assembly, a Ballistic Spreading Gun assembly, and SEAWARS. The NES-25A is used in T-2 aircraft.

(8) A/P22P-11 Emergency Egress Crew Backpack Assembly. The A/P22P-11 is a back type parachute with a 26-foot conical canopy, and is designed for use with the PCU-33/P or PCU-56/P series Torso Harness Assemblies. The two-piece, upper and lower crew backpack containers are constructed of rigid fiberglass material, and are mated by two hinges and straight pins. The upper container houses the parachute, and the lower container houses an SSK-9/P22P-11 seat survival kit assembly, an emergency oxygen system assembly, LRU-18/U, and survival items. The A/P22P-11 is used for emergency bailout from the E-2C aircraft.

(9) A/P28S-24 Personnel Parachute Assembly. The A/P28S-24 is an ejection seat, headrest type, maneuverable, recovery parachute with a type 1000, 17-foot aeroconical canopy. It is integral to the SJU-5/A and SJU-6/A Aircrew Automated Ejection Seat Escape System, is designed for use with the PCU-33/P or PCU-56/P series Torso Harness Assemblies, and incorporates SEAWARS. The rear of the canopy has two orifices covered with Terylene netting, located 90-degrees apart in gores 4 and 18, to provide forward thrust and horizontal velocity. Two steering lines provide directional control during descent. The aeroconical canopy and the duplex drogue parachute assemblies are packed in a rigid container that is also the headrest for the ejection seat. The A/P28S-24 is used in the F/A-18A/B and F/A-18C/D (lot twelve only) aircraft.

(10) A/P28S-28, -30, -31 Headrest Assemblies. The A/P28S-28, -30, and -31 are ejection seat, headrest type parachutes using a 28-foot standard flat canopy. They are integral to the SJU-4/A, -13/A and -14/A Ejection Seat Escape Systems using the PCU-29/A drogue parachute, are designed for use with the PCU-33/P or PCU-56/P series Torso Harness Assemblies, and incorporate SEAWARS. The A/P28S-28, -30, and -31 are used in AV-8B and TAV-8B aircraft.

(11) A/P28S-32 Personnel Parachute Assembly. The A/P28S-32 is an ejection seat, headrest type, maneuverable, recovery parachute with a type 5000, 21-foot aeroconical canopy. It is integral to the SJU-17 series NACES Escape Systems, is designed for use with the PCU-33/P or PCU-56/P series Torso Harness Assemblies, and incorporates SEAWARS. There are five variants of the A/P28S-32, each basically similar with the difference being confined to the shape and size of the aircraft canopy breakers on the parachute container.

The canopy has two Le-Moigne slots, located 180-degrees apart in gores 6 and 16, to provide directional control and forward velocity on command. The Le-Moigne slots are locked in the closed position by toggle and handle to ensure that the parachute descends vertically on initial opening. Directional control and forward velocity is initially selected by pulling down the two handles between the risers, unlocking the toggle from its loop securing the slots in the closed position. Once the handle and toggle are pulled and the tension is released from the steering lines, the slots open and provide forward drive to the canopy. The aeroconical canopy is packed into a deployment sleeve assembly, which is then packed into a rigid container that attaches to the upper forward face of the ejection seat and serves as a headrest for aircrew personnel. The A/P28S-32 is used in the T-45A, F-14D, F/A-18C/D (except lot twelve), and F/A-18E/F aircraft.

(12) MXU-746/P and MXU-747/P Parachute Harness Sensing Release Units. The PHSRU, also known as SEAWARS, provides a cartridge activated backup automatic mode of separating the parachute from aircrew personnel. Manually activating the canopy release assembly is the primary mode of separating the risers from the aircrew. Automatic release is intended for disabled aircrew personnel or when there is insufficient time to manually activate the release. SEAWARS are designed to release within two seconds after seawater entry. Immersion in fresh water will not activate SEAWARS. The SEAWARS consists of two PHSRUs, both fitted to each set of parachute risers. The left and right sets of risers are designated MXU-746/P and MXU-747/P, respectively. Aircraft application is as described in the associated parachute aircraft applications listed above.

o. Rescue Equipment. Rescue Equipment is comprised of common tools and special equipment used by SAR teams to extract downed aircrewmen. Rescue equipment consists of Aldis lamps, cable grips, carabiners, chemical lights, belay ropes, electric sea markers, pneumatic hand tools, hoisting slings, hoisting vests, forest penetrators, rescue hooks, litters, rescue medical kits, mountain boots, rescue nets, rescue straps, portable oxygen systems, and rappelling equipment. A detailed description of each item may be found in the Aviation Crew Systems Manual, NAVAIR 13-1-6.5.

p. Search and Rescue Swimmer's Personal Equipment. The SAR swimmer's ensemble is an exposure protective assembly designed for continuous wear, and protects the SAR swimmer from exposure to cold water, wind, and spray resulting from emergency rescue actions at sea. The SAR swimmer's wet-suit ensemble consists of a custom made two-piece Farmer John style wet suit, a custom-made two-piece shorty wet suit, hood, gloves, boots, and mask. The mask has a wrap-around face plate made of tempered glass. The snorkel is made of a flexible hose unit and has a mouthpiece attached to a solid upper tube. The swim fins are constructed of solid pliable rubber with adjustable straps and buckles.

q. Seat Survival Kits. The typical seat survival kit is designed for use with a specific ejection system and functions as a seat for the aircrew member. It serves as a container for an emergency oxygen system, life raft, and survival equipment required after ejection. A seat survival kit is a rigid-type container fabricated of molded fiberglass and fits into the seat bucket. It is securely attached by lock receptacles at the lower aft corners of the seat bucket and a negative-G retaining pin receptacle at center forward on the lower container. During normal operation, the kit provides support and comfort for the aircrewman as well as routing for emergency oxygen and communications. If failure occurs in the aircraft oxygen supply, or in case of high altitude or underwater ejection, the kit provides an emergency supply of oxygen for approximately 20 minutes. The lid of the container is fastened to a metal valance and contains the latches and oxygen equipment.

The lower portion of the container consists of the latching mechanism, life raft, and survival equipment including an AN/URT-33A emergency radio beacon. The radio beacon lanyard is attached to the aircraft and is actuated when the aircrewman ejects. The two parts of the kit are fastened together by a lock and latch mechanism and can be quickly separated for access to the life raft and survival equipment. The ventilated seat cushion and the non-ventilated thigh support cushions are attached with hook and loop fasteners.

(1) SKK-9 Life Raft and Survival Kit. The SKK-9 is part of the A/P22P-11 Crew Backpack Assembly. It functions as a backrest for aircrew personnel, a container for a parachute assembly, a container for an emergency oxygen system, and as a life raft and survival items container. It is made up of a rigid two-piece fiberglass container and houses an LRU-18/U one man vee-bottom life raft in the lower container on the right hand side. The SKK-9 is not designed for use independent of the A/P22P-11 Crew Backpack; it is used for emergency bailout from the E-2C aircraft.

(2) Soft Pack Survival Kits. The Seat Pans (Douglas, P/N 5811863-503, and the SP-1A, P/N 68A74E1-1) are designed for use with both ejection and non-ejection seats and function as a seat for aircrew personnel as well as a container for an emergency oxygen system. The Soft Pack Survival Kits (Standard, Special, High Speed, and Modified High Speed Soft Packs) may be used with the seat pans and function as a container for a life raft and survival items. These Seat Pans and Soft Pack Survival Kits are used in conjunction with the NC-3, NB-6, and NB-8 parachute assemblies in C-2, C-130, P-3, T-34, and T-39 aircraft.

(3) Ventilated Seat Pan. The Ventilated Seat Pan is designed for use with non-ejection seat aircraft. It functions as a seat for aircrew personnel as well as a container for an emergency oxygen system, and is attached to a SSP survival kit. The Ventilated Seat Pan and SSP are used in the E-2C and C-2A aircraft.

(4) RSSK-3 Seat Survival Kit. The RSSK-3 is designed for use with the North American LS-1 ejection seat and functions as a seat for aircrew personnel as well as an emergency oxygen system, life raft, and survival equipment container. Manufactured by North American Rockwell Corporation, the RSSK-3 is used in T-2 series aircraft.

(5) RSSK-8 Series Seat Survival Kit. The RSSK-8 series is designed for use with Douglas ESCAPAC ejection seats and functions as a seat for aircrew personnel as well as an emergency oxygen system, life raft, and survival equipment container. There are three manufacturers of the RSSK-8 series, Rocket Jet Engineering Corporation, Scott Aviation Corporation, and East-West Industries. The RSSK-8 series is used in all models of the A-4 and S-3 aircraft.

(6) SKU-2/A Seat Survival Kit. The SKU-2/A is designed for use with the MK-GRU-7, MK-GRU-7A, and MK-GRUEA-7 Ejection Systems and functions as a seat for aircrew personnel and as an emergency oxygen system, life raft, and survival equipment container. The basic SKU-2/A is manufactured by East-West Industries, and Grumman Aerospace Corporation supplies complete assemblies. The SKU-2/A is used in the F-14A/B and EA-6B aircraft.

(7) SKU-3/A Seat Survival Kit. The SKU-3/A is designed for use with the SJU-5/A and SJU-6/A Ejection Seats and functions as a seat for aircrew personnel and as an emergency oxygen system, life raft, and survival equipment container. The basic SKU-3/A is manufactured by East-West Industries, and McDonnell Aircraft Company supplies complete assemblies. The SKU-3/A is used in the F/A-18A/B and F/A-18C/D (lot twelve only) aircraft.

(8) SKU-6/A Seat Survival Kit. The SKU-6/A is designed for use with the SJU-4/A Ejection Seat and functions as a seat for aircrew personnel and as an emergency oxygen system, life raft, and survival equipment container. The basic SKU-6/A is manufactured by East-West Industries, and Stencel Aero Engineering Corporation supplies complete assemblies. The SKU-6/A is used in the AV-8B aircraft.

(9) SKU-7/A Seat Survival Kit. The SKU-7/A is designed for use with the SJU-17(V)3/A and SJU-17(V)4/A versions of the NACES Ejection Seat System, and functions as a seat for aircrew personnel and as an emergency oxygen system, life raft, and survival equipment container. The basic SKU-7/A is manufactured by East-West Industries, and Martin-Baker Limited supplies complete assemblies. The SKU-7/A is used in the F-14D aircraft.

(10) SKU-10/A Seat Survival Kit. The SKU-10/A is designed for use with the SJU-17(V)1/A and SJU-17(V)2/A versions of the NACES Ejection Seat System, and functions as a seat for aircrew personnel and as an emergency oxygen system, LRU-23/P Life Raft, and survival equipment container. The basic SKU-10/A is manufactured by East-West Industries, and Martin-Baker Limited supplies complete assemblies. The SKU-10/A is used in the F/A-18C Bureau Numbers 164197 and subsequent, F/A-18D Bureau Numbers 164196 and subsequent, and F/A-18E/F aircraft.

(11) SKU-11/A Seat Survival Kit. The SKU-11/A is designed for use with the SJU-17(V)5/A and SJU-17(V)6/A versions of the NACES ejection seat system, and functions as a seat for aircrew personnel and as an emergency oxygen system, LRU-23/P Life Raft, and survival equipment container. The basic SKU-11/A is manufactured by East-West Industries, and Martin-Baker Limited supplies complete assemblies. The SKU-11/A is used in the T-45A aircraft.

(12) SKU-12/A Seat Survival Kit. The SKU-12/A is designed for use with the MK-GRU-7, MK-GRU-7A, and MK-GRUEA-7 Ejection Systems and functions as a seat for aircrew personnel and as an emergency oxygen system, life raft, and survival equipment container. The basic SKU-12/A is manufactured and supplied by American Safety Flight Systems. The SKU-12/A is used in the F-14A/B Bureau Numbers 157980 through 159630 and EA-6B Bureau Numbers 159631 and subsequent.

r. Survival Vests

(1) SV-2B Survival Vest. The SV-2B is designed for use by all aircrew members except when small arms protective body armor is worn. The vest provides storage for survival equipment while maintaining minimum bulk and weight. Additionally, the vest provides for integration of a life preserver and chest-mounted oxygen regulator. It does not interfere with use of either the regular or integrated-type parachute harness.

The SV-2B is constructed basically of nylon cloth. An adjustable harness, leg straps, and entrance side fastener provide the means of fitting and securing the vest to the aircrew member. Elastic straps at the rear allow for greater mobility. Pockets are provided for stowage of survival items. When required, a chest-mounted oxygen regulator is located inside a fabric sleeve and secured to the vest with Velcro.

(2) CMU-21/P22P-7(V) Survival Vest. The CMU-21/P22P-7(V) is an SV-2B modified by ACC 522 and is not a procured item. The modification allows for expansion of the vest's circumference for wear over bulky clothing, and is designed for use of aircrew members in patrol aircraft.

(3) CMU-23( )/P Survival Vest. The CMU-23/P series is an SV-2B modified by ACC 506 for use with helicopter aircrew equipped with the A/P22P-9(V) CBR Protective Clothing Ensemble, and is not a procured item. The CMU-23A/P is an SV-2B or CMU-23/P modified by ACC 616 for rotary wing aircrews who are equipped with the A/P22P-14(V)1 CBR NDI Respirator Assembly and is a dual-purpose vest. For routine missions where there is no potential of CBR exposure, the CMU-23A/P vest is configured like a normal SV-2B. With interchangeable pocket configuration, however, the CMU-23A/P vest can be quickly reconfigured for missions requiring CBR protection.

(4) CMU-24/P Survival Vest. The CMU-24/P is designed for use by all over land SAR and TH-57 Helicopter aircrew members. The vest provides storage for survival equipment necessary during overland missions. The CMU-24/P is constructed of nylon mesh fabric with woven nylon pockets. It has a separating slide fastener front closure and lacing located on the back for size adjustment.

(5) CMU-29(V)2/P Chemical Biological Radiological Overvest. The CMU-29(V)2/P is used to store the pusher fan and filter canister when the A/P22P-14(V) CBR Respirator Assemblies are worn by fixed wing aircrews. It is worn over either the CMU-23A/P or CMU-33/P. It is constructed primarily of nylon mesh, nylon straps, and nylon cloth, and incorporates adjustable shoulder and waist straps along with a front slide fastener. Pockets are provided for stowage of the pusher fan and filter canister, battery, flashlight, hook knife, and oxygen mini-regulator.

(6) CMU-30/P22P-15 Survival Vest. The CMU-30/P22P-15 is designed specifically for helicopter aircrews operating in hostile territory, and is compatible with the LPU-21/P and both soft and hard body armor. The survival equipment pockets are modular in design so location of survival items may be changed upon approval of the type commander.

(7) CMU-33/P22P-18(V) Survival Vest. The CMU-33/P22P-18(V) is an integral component of the A/P22P-18(V) Aircrew Survival - Armor Protective Assembly, and is designed to be compatible with PRU-60A/P22P-15 and PRU-61A/P22P-15 armor assemblies, Army .50 caliber armor assembly, and Navy, Air Force, and Army life preserver assemblies. The survival equipment pockets are modular in design so location of survival items may be configured to suit type commander requirements and different environments. There are two configurations of the vest, Type I and Type II.

The Type I vest has an integrated removable hoisting harness, designed for use by aircrews of helicopters and most fixed-wing non-ejection seat aircraft, and is currently being evaluated for use in the V-22 aircraft. The Type II vest has no integrated hoisting harness but comes with torso harness attachment straps, and is designed to integrate with the PCU-33 series or PCU-56 series Torso Harnesses worn by fixed-wing ejection seat aircraft aircrews and some fixed-wing non-ejection seat aircraft.

s. Aircrew Survival Armor Protective Assemblies

(1) A/P22P-15 Helicopter Aircrew Survival and Armor Protective Assembly. The A/P22P-15 fully integrates a CMU-30/P22P-15, LPU-21/P, and PRU-61/P22P-15 Hard and PRU-60/P22P-15 Soft Small Arms Protective Body Armor. It provides protection, both front and back, for the vital organs of the aircrew member's torso against armor-piercing rounds up to .30 caliber, and has been designed to provide one-hand, two-operation quick disconnect of the hard armor plates. The PRU-60/P22P-15 soft armor provides Type IIIA protection against small arms such as the .44 magnum and 9 mm. The PRU-61/P22P-15 Hard Armor provides Type IV protection, or up to .30 caliber armor-piercing bullets.

(2) A/P22P-18(V) Aircrew Survival - Armor Protective Assembly. The A/P22P-18(V) (formerly referred to as AIRSAVE) is a Joint, Tri-Service effort designed to replace existing survival vests (Navy and Marine Corps AISAP, Army SARVIP, and Air Force CMU-21/P) and be usable in all aircraft communities. It consists of a Type I or II CMU-33/P22P-18(V) Survival Vest, soft or hard body armor, and a flotation assembly. It is compatible with the Navy and Marine Corps LPU-21/P, LPU-23/P, LPU-33/P, and LPU-34/P; the Air Force LPU-9; and the Army LPU-10 Life Preservers. Enhanced aircrew vital organ protection is provided since the vest is also compatible with PRU-60/P22P-15 Soft and PRU-61/P22P-15 Hard Armor and the Army .50 caliber armor plate. It has been designed to provide one-hand, two operation quick disconnect of the hard armor plate.

t. Torso Harness. The Torso Harness provides for the integration of the parachute harness, lap belt assembly, shoulder restraint, and rescue harness. The harness provides mobility while restraining the wearer to the seat during emergency conditions, and serves as a parachute harness during ejection. The torso harness consists of a nylon webbing harness. An adjustable shoulder restraint with quick-release fittings provides attachment of a parachute assembly. A gated D-ring attached to the right hand shoulder adjustable strap is inter-woven with the canopy release adapter, and attaches to the helicopter hoist hook during rescue. There are currently four different harnesses in use.

(1) PCU-17/P Crew Restraint Harness Assembly. The PCU-17/P integrates the Air Force PCU-17/P Personnel Restraint Harness and the Air Force HBU-6/P Safety Strap Assemblies, as the authorized Navy SAR-Loadmaster crew safety-restraint system. The PCU-17/P provides crew restraint when performing SAR kit and air drop duties from the P-3 aircraft, and Loadmaster and air drop duties from the C-2 aircraft, and may not be used in conjunction with any Navy Emergency Personnel Parachute Assemblies or Systems.

(2) PCU-26/P Personnel Parachute Torso Suit Harness Assembly. The PCU-26/P and the HBU-18/A Lap Belt Assembly are designed for aircrew personnel to don in the aircraft. The PCU-26/P Torso Harness Assembly and HBU-18/A Lap Belt configuration are exclusively designed for use by the Blue Angels aboard the flight demonstration F/A-18 aircraft, and may not be used with any other parachute assembly or aircraft system.

(3) PCU-33/P Series Parachute Restraint Harness Assembly. The PCU-33/P series provides integration of the parachute harness, lap belt assembly, and the shoulder restraint harness. It provides mobility for aircrew personnel while providing restraint in the seat and serves as a parachute harness in case of aircraft ejection or bailout. The PCU-33/P consists of nylon webbing encased in a nylon fabric channel and is configured into a sleeveless, legless, torso garment available in 16 stock sizes and custom-fit. A gated D-ring is interwoven with the canopy release adapter on the right shoulder strap to facilitate the rescue of downed aircrew personnel. Webbing bands are incorporated at the waist area for attaching a life preserver in the event a survival vest is not used. The basic harness can be modified into seven different configurations through incorporation of various Aircrew Systems Changes to add different survival item pockets, eliminating the requirement for a survival vest. The PCU-33/P is utilized in all AV-8, C-2, E-2, EA-6B, S-3, T-2, TA-4, T-45, F-14, and F/A-18 aircraft. The PCU-33/P is being replaced through attrition by the PCU-56/P series Harness.

(4) PCU-56/P Series Parachute Restraint Harness Assembly. The PCU-56/P series was designed to replace the PCU-33/P series through attrition, and incorporates many design changes to accommodate both male and female aircrew personnel. Like the PCU-33/P, it consists of nylon webbing encased in a nylon fabric channel and is configured into a sleeveless, legless, torso garment. However, the PCU-56/P allows for a harness adapter assembly to be used in order to adjust the harness to a vast range of sizes, reducing the number of stock sizes from 17 to 3. It also incorporates two channels in the main sling for the routing of the chest strap, thus making it even more adjustable than a PCU-33/P series harness. An optional inner garment vest assembly is available to facilitate optimum fitting of the chest strap for female aircrew personnel. These changes combined to reduce the number of requirements for custom-fit PCU-33/P series Harnesses. However, a custom-fit PCU-56/P is available to those aircrew personnel who are unable to achieve a proper fit with available stock sizes. The basic harness can be modified into four different configurations through incorporation of various Aircrew Systems Changes to add different survival item pockets, eliminating the requirement for a survival vest. The PCU-56/P is utilized in all AV-8, C-2, E-2, EA-6B, S-3, T-2, TA-4, T-45, F-14, and F/A-18 aircraft.

u. Underwater Emergency Breathing Devices. There are currently two Underwater Emergency Breathing Devices in use, the SRU-36/P Helicopter Emergency Egress Device (HEED) and the SRU-40/P HABD. The SRU-40/P will replace the SRU-36/P through attrition.

(1) SRU-36/P Helicopter Emergency Egress Device. The SRU-36/P HEED is a compact, lightweight breathing apparatus used by helicopter, E-2, and C-2 aircrew personnel during emergency ditching in water, and is being evaluated for use in the MV-22. The device provides two to four minutes of breathing air depending on the depth under water, water temperature, and the individual using the device. The SRU-36/P HEED is composed of two major components; an aluminum cylinder and a demand-type, 2-stage regulator with attached mouthpiece. The cylinder has a capacity of 1.8 cubic feet of air at a rated pressure of 3000 Pounds Per Square Inch (PSI). The regulator is a simple demand type mounted directly into the cylinder. The regulator consists of a metallic inner main body encased in a plastic housing, exhaust disc, pressure indicator, and an on-off valve.

(2) SRU-40/P Helicopter Aircrew Breathing Device. The SRU-40/P HABD is a compact, lightweight breathing assembly with a rated cylinder pressure of 3000 PSI. It is intended for use by helicopter, E-2, and C-2 aircrew personnel during emergency ditching in water, and is being evaluated for use in the MV-22. The device provides one to three minutes of breathing air depending upon the depth under water, water temperature, and the individual using the device. The SRU-40/P HABD is a two stage device that comes in one size only. It is a compact, self-contained breathing device consisting of a first stage regulator and a second stage regulator with a 20-inch hose connecting the two regulators.

The first stage regulator assembly consists of the first stage regulator subassembly, the pressure gage subassembly, and the cylinder. An indicator ring on the first stage displays on-off status and a safety burst disc in the safety disc subassembly prevents over pressurization. The cylinder has a capacity of 1.5 cubic feet of air at a rated pressure of 3000 PSI.

The second stage regulator consists of the mouthpiece subassembly and the box bottom, the plastic chamber, and other integral parts. It has two exhaust valves that are covered for protection from becoming unseated, and provide greater security of a negative pressure in the demand chamber. Because of the constant pressure between the two stages, breathing is relatively easy and water does not enter the mouthpiece or chamber.

v. Night Vision Imaging Systems. There are currently three different Night Vision Imaging Systems in use in Navy and Marine Corps Aircraft, the MXU-810/U Cats-Eyes Night Vision System, the AN/AVS-6(V) Aviators Night Vision Imaging System (ANVIS), and the AN/AVS-9(V) Night Vision Image Intensifier Set. The AN/AVS-9(V) Night Vision Image Intensifier Set is a new upgrade that uses state-of-the-art light intensifying technology to incorporate substantial improvements in clarity of night vision imaging, resulting in near 20/20 vision. The system provides significant increases in all areas of performance and reliability over the MXU-810/U Cats-Eyes and older Omni II versions of the AN/AVS-6(V). The AN/AVS-9(V) is currently in acquisition Phase III, is being introduced to the fleet, and will replace the MXU-810/U Cats-Eyes Night Vision System and the AN/AVS-6(V) ANVIS through attrition. Refer to NTP A-50-9304/A for additional information on the MXU-810/U Cats-Eyes Night Vision System. Refer to NTP A-50-8214D/D for additional information on the AN/AVS-6(V) ANVIS. Refer to the Initial NTSP for additional information on the AN/AVS-9(V) Night Vision Image Intensifier Set.

2. Physical Description. Not Applicable (NA)

3. New Development Introduction. Various ALSS items have been introduced into the fleet over the past two decades as new production items. The following items are recent additions or will be added to the ALSS inventory in the near future.

a. Navy Combat Edge. The NCE is being introduced into the fleet through the Type Commanders as new production items. Introduction began in November 1999.

b. TTU-551/E Leakage Tester. The TTU-551/E is manufactured by NAWCAD Lakehurst, and is planned for introduction into the fleet through the Type Commanders as an addition to the Individual Material Readiness List (IMRL). A total of fifty-six units were procured, manufactured, and are currently being introduced to the fleet. The use of ABO in organizational level Aircrew Survival Equipmentmen (PR) Work Centers (WC) aboard ship is an issue requiring resolution. There are currently two plans being evaluated. Final resolution will be reflected in future updates of this NTSP. The two alternatives are:

    • Exclusive use of the test set at the intermediate level Oxygen Shop (81C) aboard ship
    • Use of filtered clean compressed air instead of ABO at the organizational level aboard ship

c. CWU-79/P Passenger Anti-Exposure Survival System. The CWU-79/P PAESS was introduced first in December 1995 (450 units) through an Engineering Change Proposal (ECP) to modify a surplus stock of existing size-12 CWU-62A/P Anti-Exposure Suits. These suits were modified by various Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance Departments (AIMD).

d. A/P22P-7 (V) Quick Donning Flyer's Anti-Exposure Apparel Assembly CWU-60/P. The CWU-60/P replaced the QD-1.

e. AN/URT-140 Radio Beacon Set. The AN/URT-140 Radio Beacon Set will replace approximately 8,000 AN/URT-33A and AN/PRT-5 systems. The initial delivery of 80 units was completed in March 2000. The remaining units will be delivered through a series of three more lots scheduled for delivery completion by September 2000. The distribution plan is for production assets to be divided evenly between and introduced by the Fleet Type Commanders, Commander Naval Air Force Atlantic Fleet (COMNAVAIRLANT), and Commander Naval Air Force Pacific Fleet (COMNAVAIRPAC).

f. AN/PRC-149 Radio Set. The AN/PRC-149 Radio Set will replace approximately 11,000 AN/PRC-90-2, AN/PRC-112, and AN/PRC-125 systems. The initial delivery of 400 units was completed in March 2000. The remaining units will be delivered through a series of three more lots scheduled for delivery completion by September 2000. The distribution plan is for production assets to be divided evenly between and introduced by the Fleet Type Commanders (COMNAVAIRLANT and COMNAVAIRPAC).

g. AN/PRC-112 Radio Set. The initial delivery of 3,726 AN/PRC-112 Radio Sets has been completed. The Naval Inventory Control Point (NAVICP) procures the radio through the Army.

h. Advanced Laser Eye Protection Visor. The ALEPV is currently in Phase II (Engineering and Manufacturing Development) of the Weapon System Acquisition Process, with Acquisition Milestone III scheduled for March 2000. It is scheduled for introduction into the fleet through the Fleet Type Commanders and issued upon deployment of the receiving squadron.

i. LPU-32/P Life Preserver Assembly. The LPU-32/P will replace the LPU-30/P and LPP-1/1A through attrition. The initial contract of 9,000 units has been completed. The LPU-32/P was introduced to the fleet as a new production item in FY99.

j. LPU-33/P Low Profile Flotation Collar. The LPU-33/P LPFC will replace the LPU-23/P through attrition. The initial contract of 12,000 units was awarded in July 1996. The distribution plan is for production assets to be divided evenly between and introduced by the Fleet Type Commanders (COMNAVAIRLANT and COMNAVAIRPAC).

k. LPU-34/P Low Profile Flotation Collar. The LPU-34/P LPFC will replace the LPU-21/P through attrition. The initial contract of 12,000 units was awarded in July 1996. The distribution plan is for production assets to be divided evenly between and introduced by the Fleet Type Commanders (COMNAVAIRLANT and COMNAVAIRPAC).

l. FLU-8B/P Automatic Inflation Device. Information is not currently available.

m. PCU-56/P Torso Harness. The initial delivery of the PCU-56/P Torso Harness has been completed. Continued delivery is through normal supply channels.

n. SRU-40/P Helicopter Aircrew Breathing Device. The SRU-40/P HABD will replace approximately 8,000 SRU-36/P HEEDs through attrition.

o. Multi-Place Life Raft. The MPLR began fleet introduction as a new production item in FY00. Attrition is projected to occur over a ten-year period, with final deliveries in FY10.

4. Significant Interfaces. Most ALSS provides the necessary interfaces between personnel and the aircraft as well as the environment under several scenarios as depicted in the functional descriptions above.

5. New Features, Configurations, or Material. NA

H. CONCEPTS

1. Operational Concept. ALSS consists of specialized clothing and equipment that provide aircrew members with a physiologically safe environment, a means of escaping a disabled aircraft, and the capability to survive and interface with rescuers after escape.

2. Maintenance Concept. The Naval Aviation Maintenance Program (NAMP), Office of the Chief of Naval Operations Instruction (OPNAVINST) 4790.2G, provides general direction and guidance regarding the maintenance of ALSS. The Aviation Crew Systems Manual, NAVAIR 13-1-6.1 through NAVAIR 13-1-6.10, provides specific guidance and technical information related to the configuration, application, function, inspection, and repair of aircrew safety and survival equipment. The information contained in each volume is intended for organizational, intermediate, and depot levels of maintenance as prescribed by the NAMP.

The maintenance concept for ALSS is based on preventive and corrective maintenance including inspections, fittings, adjustments, repair, rework, and replacement of malfunctioning parts or clothing items while maximizing the use of the lowest level of maintenance.

The maintenance concept for the MPLR is based on preventive maintenance including inspections and replacement of expired survival items at the organizational level. Intermediate maintenance is limited to Place-In-Service inspections on new acquisitions only. All corrective maintenance and five-year recertification will be accomplished by contractor supported depot level maintenance.

a. Organizational. Organizational level maintenance of ALSS consists of preventive and corrective maintenance actions performed at the squadron level. Navy PR and Marine Corps Flight Equipment Marines, Military Occupational Specialty (MOS) 6060, maintain the flight equipment including clothing, masks, helmets, regulators, flotation devices, survival equipment, and parachutes in WC 13A, Aircrew Personal Protective Survival Equipment Shop. Aviation Structural Mechanics (Safety Equipment) (AMEs) and Marine Corps Aircraft Safety Equipment Mechanics with the appropriate aircraft Navy Enlisted Classification (NEC) or MOS maintain the ejection seats and oxygen systems in WC 13B, the Egress and Environmental Systems Shop.

(1) Preventive Maintenance. Preventive Maintenance (PM) of all ALSS is conducted at specific intervals in accordance with established procedures depicted in the Maintenance Requirements Cards (MRC) for each specific type of equipment. PM may consist of any of the following actions: inspections, adjustments, functional tests, scheduled removal and replacement, and lubrication as prescribed in the MRCs.

(2) Corrective Maintenance. Corrective Maintenance (CM) of ALSS may consist of any of the following actions depending on the specific requirements to maintain the equipment: system testing, fault isolation, removal and repair or replacement of defective parts, and inspections. When appropriate, faulty Weapon Replaceable Assemblies are forwarded to the intermediate level for repair.

b. Intermediate. Intermediate level maintenance of ALSS is performed at Navy AIMDs by PR personnel and at Marine Aviation Logistics Squadrons (MALS) by Marine Corps personnel, MOS 6060. PR 7356 personnel perform tests, inspections, and repair of various oxygen systems, regulators, and test stands. In the Aviators' Life Support Systems Division, WC 800, maintenance actions include functional tests and adjustments, fault isolation, and the removal and replacement of high-time and defective parts. Shore station AIMD facilities also provide organizational level support for Naval Air Facility (NAF)/NAS/Operational Maintenance Department (OMD) personnel and transient aircrew personnel.

Emergency radios are tested and inspected by Navy Aviation Electronics Technicians (AT), NEC 6611, and Marine Corps Aircraft Communication Systems Technician, MOS 6412, in WC 610, Communications and Navigation Branch.

c. Depot. Depot level maintenance of specific ALSS equipment is performed at Naval Aviation Depots (NAVAVNDEPOTs) or Contract Depot Repair Activities. Most ALSS does not require depot level maintenance. However, maintenance actions at this level consist of repairs, adjustments, calibration, and inspections. Naval Surface Warfare Center Indian Head, Maryland, is responsible for all cartridges, Cartridge Actuated Devices (CAD), and Aircrew Escape Propulsion System (AEPS) devices employed by ejection seat systems that are reworkable. Ejection seats undergo depot level rework concurrently with the aircraft's Standard Depot Level Maintenance (SDLM) cycle.

SPECIFIC ALSS MAINTENANCE RESPONSIBILITIES

 

ORGANIZATIONAL

INTERMEDIATE

DEPOT

MAJOR

ALSS GROUP

SKILL

MOS

WC

SKILL

MOS

WC

 

Anti-Exposure Clothes

PR

6060

13A

PR 0000

6060

81A

NA

*Anti-G Garments

PR

6060

13A

PR 0000

6060

81A

NA

*Aviator's Clothing

PR

6060

13A

PR 0000

6060

81A

NA

*Breathing Masks

PR

6060

13A

PR 0000

6060

81A

NA

CBR Protective Clothes

PR

6060

13A

PR 0000

6060

81A

NA

+Ejection Seats

AME

6083

6085

6086

6087

13B

AME 8332

6083

81D

Designated

Naval Aviation Depot (NADEP)

or Contractor

Maintenance

Emergency Radios

PR

6060

13A

AT 6611

6412

610

Designated

NADEP

*Helmets

PR

6060

13A

PR 0000

6060

81A

NA

*ALEPV

PR

6060

13A

PR 0000

6060

81A

NA

Life Rafts

PR

6060

13A

PR 0000

6060

81B

NA

MPLR

PR

6060

13A

PR 0000

6060

81B

Contractor

Maintenance

Liquid Oxygen Converters

AME

6083

6085

6086

6087

13B

PR 7356

6060

81C

Designated

NADEP

NCE

PR

6060

13A

PR 0000

6060

81A

NA

Oxygen Regulators

PR

6060

13A

PR 7356

6060

81C

Designated

NADEP

Parachutes

PR

6060

13A

PR 0000

6060

81A

NA

Life Preservers

PR

6060

13A

PR 0000

6060

81B

NA

Rescue Equipment

PR

6060

13A

PR 0000

6060

81A

NA

SAR Swimmers Personal Equipment

PR

6060

13A

PR 0000

6060

81A

NA

Seat Survival Kits

PR

6060

13A

PR 7356

6060

81B/81C

NA

Survival Vests

PR

6060

13A

PR 0000

6060

81A

NA

Torso Harnesses

PR

6060

13A

PR 0000

6060

81A

NA

* Note: Station AIMDs provide organizational level support on these items for NAF/NAS/OMD personnel and transient aircrew personnel.

+ Note: Ejection Seat intermediate level maintenance is performed only at NAS Whidbey Island, Washington.

d. Interim Maintenance. NA

e. Life-Cycle Maintenance Plan. The MPLR is the only component of ALSS other than ejection seats incorporating a life-cycle maintenance plan. The organizational level will remove and forward the MPLR to the contractor once every five years for recertification. Ejection seats undergo depot level rework concurrently with the aircraft's SDLM cycle.

3. Manning Concept. No changes are necessary to current manpower requirements. ALSS operators are the aircrew members who wear the protective clothing and equipment and use the aircraft installed systems. Navy PR personnel and Marine Corps Flight Equipment Marines, MOS 6060, perform organizational and intermediate level maintenance on most ALSS. AME personnel and Marine Corps Aircraft Safety Equipment Mechanics (MOSs 6083, 6085, 6086, and 6087) perform organizational level maintenance on ejection seats and oxygen systems installed on specific aircraft. Organizational and intermediate maintenance manpower is driven by the overall maintenance requirements at each activity and not by any particular ALSS item.

4. Training Concept. Initial operator and maintenance training for all ALSS currently employed has been completed. Initial training for new ALSS will either be conducted by the manufacturer or contractor or will be conducted by Navy personnel who will provide on-site indoctrination training to aircrew and maintenance personnel. Follow-on ALSS operator training is conducted as part of general and aircraft-specific aircrew training via aviation physiology, aviation water survival, and Fleet Readiness Squadron (FRS) training.

The established training concept for most aviation maintenance training divides "A" School courses into two or more segments called Core and Strand. Many organizational level "C" School courses are also divided into separate Initial and Career training courses. "A" School Core courses include general knowledge and skills training for the particular rating, while "A" School Strand courses focus on the more specialized training requirements for that rating and a specific aircraft or equipment, based on the student's fleet activity destination. Strand training immediately follows Core training and is part of the "A" School. Upon completion of Core and Strand "A" Schools, graduates going to organizational level activities attend the appropriate Initial "C" School for additional specific training. Initial "C" School training is intended for students in paygrades E-4 and below. Career "C" School training is provided to organizational level personnel, E-5 and above, to enhance skills and knowledge within their field. "A" School graduates going to intermediate level activities attend the appropriate intermediate level "C" School. Intermediate level "C" Schools are not separated into Initial and Career courses. ALSS organizational and intermediate level maintenance training for PR and MOS 6060 personnel is established at PR Class A1 and intermediate level C1 schools. Marine Corps students are enrolled in both Core and Strand training as provided by the A1 course at this time.

The decision was made at the April 2000 Maintenance Training Requirements Review (MTRR) conference to eliminate the Core and Strand training track concept in the PR Class A1 school, combining C-602-2037 into C-602-2035 and eliminating the C-602-2037 Strand as a separate course. C-602-2035 was also extended by ten days to include flight clothing fitting procedures, newly procured systems, and deleting obsolete equipment. Additionally, a proposal was accepted to divide the Survival Equipment phase of the course into two units, and include night vision systems, CBR equipment, and a practical laboratory exercise.

Significant changes were approved to the PR Class C1 School, C-602-2040, in the 1997 MTRR including incorporation of the CRU-103/P Oxygen Regulator, OEAS, and the NACES Packing Press, adding a combined total of fifteen days to the existing training track. At the April 2000 MTRR, proposals to extend the course by three days to include the HABD and delete the CRU-88/P Oxygen Regulator were also approved.

Current planning is to have all accepted MTRR proposals incorporated into the training track and Ready for Training (RFT) no later than October 2001.

a. Initial Training. When new ALSS is being introduced into the fleet, two basic methods of initial training may be employed. One method is for the contractor or manufacturer to provide initial training to instructor and fleet cadre personnel. This method of initial training was used for NACES and OEAS, which were completed in FY93 and FY91, respectively.

The more common method of providing ALSS initial training is for the Fleet Air Introduction Liaison Survival Aircrew Flight Equipment (FAILSAFE) Team to visit each site, including other training activities, providing indoctrination training to aircrew and maintenance personnel. These FAILSAFE Teams receive their training either from the manufacturer or the development activity. The FAILSAFE Team for the NCE will receive their training from NAWCAD Patuxent River; however, a schedule has not yet been determined. As the NCE is introduced into the fleet, PR personnel and Marine Corps MOS 6060 personnel will receive on-site maintenance training from FAILSAFE Teams. Initial training for the PCU-56/P Torso Harness is being provided on-site by Naval Air Warfare Center, Weapons Division (NAWCWD) China Lake, instead of through FAILSAFE.

Due to their similarity to other ALSS, the Replacement Helicopter Helmet, Passenger Anti-Exposure Survival Suit, and AN/PRC-112 Survival Beacon do not require initial training. Initial training requirements for the ALEPV and MPLR have not been identified, but will be included in future updates to this NTSP.

b. Follow-On Training. ALSS follow-on training is provided to fleet personnel through several avenues. This includes formal courses conducted at a training facility and On-the-Job Training (OJT) conducted on-site by unit personnel.

(1) Operator Training. ALSS operator training is an integral part of all aircrew training courses. Aircrew members receive training through the NASTP and the appropriate FRS.

(a) Naval Aviation Survival Training Program. Aviation Survival Training Centers (ASTC) conduct several aviation physiology training courses to meet the various needs of the fleet through the NASTP. Each physiology training course provides some aspect of ALSS training as needed. This includes the proper ways of wearing, adjusting, and using the numerous garments, helmets, and masks; use of emergency and rescue equipment such as survival vests, radios, rafts, and parachutes; and procedures for employing an ejection seat. Refer to the NASTP NTSP N88-NTSP-A-50-9803/D for information on specific ALSS training courses that are provided by the ASTCs.

(b) Fleet Readiness Squadron. The FRSs conduct aircraft-specific training for aircrews, including proper fit and use of the appropriate anti-G garment, oxygen system, and ejection envelope training as identified in the NATOPS manual for the aircraft. Refer to the respective aircraft's NTSP for specific course information on aircrew training conducted at the FRSs.

(2) Maintenance Training

(a) Organizational and Intermediate Maintenance Training for PR and MOS 6060 Personnel. The majority of ALSS organizational and intermediate maintenance training for PR and MOS 6060 personnel is currently provided by the Aircrew Survival Equipmentman Class A1 course. The Class C-1 courses cover specific intermediate maintenance training requirements and are not utilized for organizational maintenance training.

The Oxygen Systems Components Test Stand/Oxygen Regulator Repair course (C-602-2027), along with the LOX Converter Test Stand/LOX Converter and SKU Repair course (C-602-2028), and the Aviators Breathing Oxygen-ABO-Test Site Operator/ Analyst course (C-670-2018) will be taught as pipeline courses through the new training track, C-602-2040. OEAS has been incorporated into the C-602-2028 pipeline, and detailed information regarding this course can be found in the OEAS NTSP listed in paragraph M. The Advanced Sewing Machine Repair course (C-602-2029) will remain a stand-alone course. Information concerning these courses is depicted below.

Title

Aircrew Survival Equipment Intermediate Maintenance Pipeline

CIN

C-602-2040 (track)

Model Manager

Naval Air Technical Training Center (NATTC) Pensacola

Description

This course provides the Aircrew Survival Equipmentman, both Navy and Marine Corps personnel, E-4 and above, the skills necessary to perform and supervise the maintenance of aviator's equipment and systems at the intermediate level of maintenance. This course is a pipeline track made up of:

  • C-670-2018, Aviators Breathing Oxygen-ABO-Test Site Operator/Analyst
  • C-602-2027, Oxygen Systems Components Test Stand/Oxygen Regulator Repair
  • C-602-2028, LOX Converter Test Stand/LOX Converter and SKU Repair

The course is group-paced instruction. All students receive the technical knowledge and skill training necessary to operate, maintain, and repair:

  • Oxygen systems component test stands
  • Personal and panel mounted oxygen regulators
  • Aviators breathing oxygen surveillance program
  • Liquid oxygen converters
  • Seat survival kits

Location

NATTC Pensacola

Length

54 days

RFT date

Currently available

Skill identifier

PR 7356

TTE/TD

As listed in element IV.A.1

Prerequisites

  • C-602-2035, Aircrew Survival Equipmentman, Common Core Class A1
  • C-602-2037, Aircrew Survival Equipmentman, Intermediate Level Strand Class A1
  • Paygrade E-5 or career designated E-4

Title

Advanced Sewing Machine Repair

CIN

C-602-2029

Model Manager

NATTC Pensacola

Description

This course provides the Aircrew Survival Equipmentman, both Navy and Marine Corps, skills necessary to perform and supervise the maintenance and repair of sewing machines in the Naval inventory, at the intermediate level of maintenance. The course is group-paced instruction. All students receive the technical knowledge and skill training necessary to operate, maintain, and repair sewing machines. Training is in-depth and technical, and covers all aspects of operation to timing repair and complete overhaul.

Location

NATTC Pensacola

Length

19 days

RFT date

Currently available

Skill identifier

None

TTE/TD

As listed in element IV.A.1

Prerequisite

  • C-602-2035, Aircrew Survival Equipmentman, Common Core Class A1
  • Paygrade E-5 or career designated E-4

c. Student Profiles

(1) Organizational Level Maintenance Training for AME Personnel, 83XX, and Aircraft Safety Equipment Mechanics, MOSs 6083, 6085, 6086, and 6087. ALSS organizational level maintenance training for AME and MOSs 6083, 6085, 6086, and 6087 personnel is conducted for the specific aircraft. These courses include training on the ejection seat and oxygen system for the particular aircraft, including OEAS. For current organizational maintenance course information for AMEs and Marines, as well as annual training input requirements, refer to the corresponding aircraft NTSP as listed in section M.

(2) Training for PR Personnel, Aircraft Safety Equipment Mechanics, and MOS 6060. Intermediate level maintenance training on the NACES was RFT in July 1996 for PRs at Naval Air Maintenance Training Group Detachment Maintenance Training Unit (MTU)s 1038, NAS Lemoore, California, and MTU 1039, NAS Oceana, Virginia. Refer to the NACES NTSP for additional information including annual training input requirements.

d. Training Pipelines. A training track has been established, Aircrew Survival Equipment Intermediate Maintenance, C-602-2040, for the award of NEC 7356 to PR personnel in paygrades E-5 to E-7 or career designated E-4 personnel. Organizational and intermediate maintenance courses for the OEAS and NACES are detailed in their separate NTSPs and applicable aircraft NTSPs as listed in section M. Both the OEAS and NACES NTSPs address the training track to be established for the intermediate level courses on these two systems. This pipeline training track was RFT in October 1995, and includes the following three courses:

  • C-602-2027, Oxygen Systems Components Test Stand / Oxygen Regulator Repair
  • C-602-2028, LOX Converter Test Stand / LOX Converter / OEAS and SKU Repair
  • C-670-2018, Aviators Breathing Oxygen - ABO - Test Site Operator / Analyst

The Advanced Sewing Machine Repair course is a stand-alone Class F1 course, and is not associated with any other pipeline courses or tracks.

(1) Explosive Ordnance Disposal Training. Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) training courses A-431-0011 and A-431-0012 include general training in recognition, safety procedures, disarming, and removal of CADs and AEPS devices. EOD personnel will respond in cases of crash, fire, and partial or full ejection involving an aircraft equipped with an ejection seat.

(2) Selected Reserve Training. Currently, NATTC Pensacola has not programmed Selected Reserves (SELRES) personnel for PR or ALSS training.

I. ONBOARD (IN-SERVICE) TRAINING

1. Proficiency or Other Training Organic to New Development

a. Maintenance Training Improvement Program. The Maintenance Training Improvement Program (MTIP) was implemented per OPNAVINST 4790.2 series, however, is no longer utilized. MTIP will be replaced by the Aviation Maintenance Training Continuum System (AMTCS). Current planning is for AMTCS to begin implementation for fleet deployment on 1 October 2000.

b. Aviation Maintenance Training Continuum System. AMTCS provides the Sailor or Marine career path training from their initial service entry to the end of their military career. AMTCS is an integrated system that satisfies the training and administrative requirements of both the individual and the organization; the benefits are manifested in the increased effectiveness of the technicians and the increased efficiencies of the management of the training business process. By capitalizing on technological advances and integrating systems and processes where appropriate, the right amount of training can be provided at the right time, thus meeting the CNO's mandated "just-in-time" training approach.

AMTCS provides a cost effective training continuum as an integrated system, which satisfies the training and administrative requirements of both the individual Sailor or Marine and the organization. Technology investments enabled the design and development of several state-of-the-art training and administrative tools: Computer-Based Training (CBT) for the technicians in the Fleet in the form of Interactive Courseware (ICW) with Computer Managed Instruction (CMI) and Computer Aided Instruction (CAI) for the schoolhouse.

Included in the AMTCS development effort is the Aviation Maintenance Training Continuum System - Software Module (ASM) which provides testing {Test and Evaluation (TEV)}, recording {Electronic Training Jacket (ETJ)}, and a Feedback system. The core functionality of these AMTCS tools are based and designed around actual maintenance related tasks the technicians perform, and the tasks are stored and maintained in a Master Task List (MTL) data bank. These tools are procured and fielded with appropriate COTS hardware and software i.e. Fleet Training Devices (FTD) - Laptops, PCs; Electronic Class Rooms (ECR); Learning Resource Centers (LRC) and operating software, network software and hardware.

Upon receipt of direction from OPNAV (N889H), AMTCS is to be implemented and the new tools integrated into the daily training environment of all participating aviation activities and supporting elements. AMTCS will serve as the standard training system for aviation maintenance training within the Navy and Marine Corps, and is planned to supersede the existing MTIP and Maintenance Training Management and Evaluation Program (MATMEP) programs. AMTCS implementation will begin with the F-14, E-2C, and all models F/A-18 aircraft. For more information on AMTCS refer to PMA205-3D3.

2. Personnel Qualification Standards. Personnel Qualification Standards (PQS) is no longer applicable to ALSS and has been discontinued.

3. Other Onboard or In-Service Training Packages. Marine Corps onboard training is based on the current series of MCO P4790.12, Individual Training Standards System and MATMEP. This program is designed to meet Marine Corps, as well as Navy OPNAVINST 4790.2 series, maintenance training requirements. It is a performance-based, standardized, level-progressive, documentable, training management and evaluation program. It identifies and prioritizes task inventories by MOS through a front-end analysis process that identifies task, skill, and knowledge requirements of each MOS. MTIP questions coupled to MATMEP tasks will help identify training deficiencies that can be enhanced with refresher training. (MATMEP is planned to be replaced by AMTCS.)

J. LOGISTICS SUPPORT. Due to the volume of items addressed in this NTSP, it would be impractical to provide the logistics requirements for each specific item. Since most of the ALSS has been in service for a considerable number of years, many of the items now have more than one manufacturer. Integrated Logistic Support Plans (ILSP) are not required for all ALSS. For those ALSS that require one, the ILSPs are maintained by the Aircrew Systems Program Office, PMA202. Technical manuals for ALSS are under the cognizance of the Naval Air Technical Data and Engineering Service Command (NATEC). Additional information may be obtained from PMA202. For recent ALSS additions, logistics information is listed below. As new ALSS is developed, specific logistics information on these systems will be addressed in updates to this NTSP.

1. Manufacturer and Contract Numbers. Below is a list of the contract numbers, contractor names, and addresses for the manufacturers of the new developments.

NOMENCLATURE

CONTRACT

NUMBER

MANUFACTURER

ADDRESS

NCE - Regulator

N62269-93-C-0206

Carleton Technology

10 Cobhan Drive

Orchard Park, NY 14217-4159

NCE - All other components

N62269-93-C-0206

Gentex Corporation

P.O. Box 315

Carbondale, PA 18407

TTU-551/E Leakage Tester

NA

NAWCAD Lakehurst

Highway 547

Lakehurst, NJ 08733-5108

A/P22P-14(V) Respirator Assembly

N00019-97-C-0034

Cam Lock (UK) LTD

Unit 10, Springlakes Industrial Estate

Aldershot, Hants-GU124UH, England

AN/PRC-112 Radio Set

F33657-83-C-0122-00014

Motorola, Inc. Government and Systems Technology

8201 E. McDowell Road

P.O. Box 1417

Scottsdale, AZ 85252-1417

AN/URT-140 Radio Beacon Set

N00019-98-C-0137

Talla-Com Industries

1720 West Paul Dirac Dr.

Tallahassee, FL 32303

AN/PRC-149 Radio Set

N00019-98-C-0137

Talla-Com Industries

1720 West Paul Dirac Dr.

Tallahassee, FL 32303

HGU-84/P Replacement Helicopter Helmet

N62269-92-C-0205

Gentex Corporation

P.O. Box 315

Carbondale, PA 18407

ALEPV

N62269-89-R-0215

Holographic Optics, Inc.

358 Sawmill River Road

Millwood, NY 10546

ALEPV

N62269-91-C-0254

Aotec, Inc

14 Manchnic Street

Southridge, MA 01550

LPU-32/P

N68936-98-D-????

Switlik Parachute Co.

1325 East State Street

Trenton, NJ 08609

LPU-33/P

N68936-96-D-0300

Safety Equipment, Inc.

537 Sweeten Creek Industrial Park

Ashville, NC 28803

LPU-34/P

N68936-96-D-0300

Safety Equipment, Inc.

537 Sweeten Creek Industrial Park

Ashville, NC 28803

MPLR

Government Services Administration (GSA) purchase

Air Cruisers Company

P.O. Box 180

Highway 34 South and Allaire Airport

Belmar, NJ 07719-1080

SRU-40/P Helicopter Aircrew Breathing Device

COTS

U.S. Divers Inc.

2340 Cousteau Court

Vista, CA 92083

2. Program Documentation

a. Navy Combat Edge. The ILSP for the NCE, AS-ILSP-425, was developed by NAWCAD Warminster, in August 1994, and updated in September 1995. Information on individual components of NCE is contained in NAVAIR 13-1-6.7-2.

b. TTU-551/E Leakage Tester. The User's Logistics Support Summary (ULSS) for the TTU-551/E, NAWCADLKE-U70098031, was approved in August 1999. Technical information is contained in NAVAIR 17-15GB-505, dated 16 January 1997.

c. CWU-79/P Passenger Anti-Exposure Survival Suit. The ILSP for the CWU-79/P, AS-ILSP-423, was approved in August 1994. Information is contained in Technical Manual NAVAIR 13-1-6.7-2.

d. A/P22P-7(V) Quick Donning Flyer's Anti-Exposure Apparel Assembly CWU-60/P. Information is contained in Technical Manual NAVAIR 13-1-6.7-2.

e. A/P22P-14(V) Helicopter Aircrew CBR Protective Clothing. Technical Manual NAVAIR 13-1-6.10 has currently experienced a major revision to include CBR-NDI, and a final version is currently being coordinated for review.

f. AN/PRC-112 Survival Beacon. An Army ILSP is available for the AN/PRC-112, numbered 3673-4007-03, 18 December 1987. Additional information is contained in Technical Manuals NAVAIR 13-1-6.5 and NAVAIR 16-30PRC112-2.

g. AN/URT-140 Radio Beacon Set. An ILSP was not developed for this program. Additional information is contained in Technical Manual NAVAIR 16-30URT140-1.

h. AN/PRC-149 Radio. An ILSP was not developed for this program. Additional information is contained in Technical Manual NAVAIR 16-30PRC149-1.

i. Advanced Laser Eye Protective Visor. ILSP development for the ALEPV began in December 1994. A number has not yet been assigned to this ILSP.

j. MBU-23(V)/P Enhanced Pressure-Demand Oxygen Mask. Information is contained in Technical Manual NAVAIR 13-1-6.7-3.

k. FLU-8B/P Automatic Inflation Device. Information is contained in Technical Manual NAVAIR 13-1-6.1.

l. LPU-32/P Life Preserver Assembly. Technical Manual NAVAIR 13-1-6.1-2 contains information on this assembly.

m. LPU-33/P Low Profile Flotation Collar. Technical Manual NAVAIR 13-1-6.1-2 contains information on this assembly.

n. LPU-34/P Low Profile Flotation Collar. Technical Manual NAVAIR 13-1-6.1-2 contains information on this assembly.

o. SRU-40/P Helicopter Aircrew Breathing Device. Technical Manual NAVAIR 13-1-6.5 contains information on this assembly.

p. PCU-56/P Torso Harness. An ILSP was not written for this configuration. Additional information is contained in Technical Manual NAVAIR 13-1-6.2.

q. Multi-Place Life Rafts. An ILSP was not written for the MPLR. A concept Logistic Support Analysis Record Maintenance Plan is currently being drafted by NAWCAD Patuxent River, Maryland, Crew Systems. Information will be added in updates to Technical Manual NAVAIR 13-1-6.1-1.

3. Technical Data Plan. NATEC maintains, updates, and publishes the Aviation Crew Systems Manual, NAVAIR 13-1-6 (series), NATOPS manuals, and aircraft maintenance manuals. These manuals are available to fleet units through normal channels.

4. Test Sets, Tools, and Test Equipment. Existing support equipment will be used to support new ALSS with the exception of NCE. The TTU-551/E Leakage Tester was developed to perform critical leakage tests on the CSU-21/P22P-16 Counter Pressure Vest and the HGU-87/P22P-16 and HGU-89/P22P-16 Helmet Assemblies. Special equipment or tools peculiar to the support of NCE components are initially provided with the TTU-551/E Leakage Tester, including a gaseous oxygen pressure regulator with gages. Replacement components are available through NAWCAD Lakehurst, Code 482400B562-3. The use of gaseous oxygen in shipboard organizational level PR work centers is an issue that requires resolution.

5. Repair Parts. All ALSS currently employed in the fleet have been established in the supply system. Unless otherwise stated, all ALSS have achieved Material Support Dates (MSD). The MSDs are listed by specific type of ALSS gear under Installation and Delivery Schedules in paragraph K.1.a. The NAVICP, Mechanicsburg, Pennsylvania, has been designated as the Primary Inventory Control Point for Navy assets. All components of the SAR swimmer's personal equipment are procured from commercial sources.

6. Human Systems Integration. NA

K. SCHEDULES

1. Schedule of Events. As new ALSS items are developed, schedule information will be available from the Aircrew Systems Program Office, PMA202, and will be included in future updates to this NTSP. Refer to the NACES and OEAS NTSPs for their respective delivery or installation schedule.

a. Installation and Delivery Schedules. The schedules are as follows:

(1) Navy Combat Edge. There will be no deliveries scheduled for squadron employment. The NCE is being purchased through a supply system contract. NAVICP will make the NCE available to squadrons through normal supply channels. The Initial Operational Capability (IOC) was achieved in September 1999, and the MSD is scheduled for September 2000.

(2) TTU-551/E Leakage Tester. NAWCAD Lakehurst manufactures the TTU-551/E test set. A total of fifty-six units were procured and manufactured, and are ready for delivery to the fleet. The IOC was achieved in September 1999, and MSD is scheduled for September 2000.

(3) CWU-79/P Passenger Anti-Exposure Survival Suit. There were two sources providing PAESS to the fleet. Four hundred fifty ensembles were fabricated in accordance with Aircrew Systems Change 613 by selected fleet activities and designated CWU-79/P1. One thousand size 12 CWU-62/P Series Coveralls were modified to CWU-79/P configuration by commercial contract N00383-98-C-003P. No more coveralls will be procured. MSD was achieved in February 1999.

(4) A/P22P-7 (V) Quick Donning Flyer's Anti-Exposure Apparel Assembly CWU-60/P. Contract N00383-97-D-003P is a four-year contract that will be completed in 2000.

(5) A/P22P-14 (V) Helicopter Aircrew Chemical Biological Radiological Protective Clothing. The current contract for the newest CBR-NDI acquisition is N00019-97-C-0034 and was awarded on March 13, 1997.

(6) AN/PRC-112 Survival Beacon. The initial delivery of the AN/PRC-112 has been completed. The AN/PRC-112 survival beacon is procured from the Army by the NAVICP. IOC was achieved in FY88. Motorola Inc. has completed conversion of 500 AN/PRC-112 radios to AN/PRC-112B radios. Parts support for 4000 AN/PRC-1112B units has been established, and the MSD is scheduled for October 1999. The AN/PRC-149 is scheduled to replace the AN/PRC-112 beginning in FY00 through attrition.

(7) AN/URT 140 Radio Beacon Set. The contract is N00019-98-C-0137 and was awarded on June 5, 1998. Initial delivery of 80 sets is scheduled for completion in March 2000 with three additional options available. The current program objective is 8,000 units with a contract award currently anticipated by October 1, 1999. Achievement of IOC is anticipated for April 2001. MSD is scheduled for April 2001.

(8) AN/PRC 149 Radio Set. The contract is N00019-98-C-0137 and was awarded on June 5, 1998. Initial delivery of 400 sets was completed in March 2000 with three additional options available. The current program objective is 11,000 units with a contract award currently anticipated by October 1, 1999. Achievement of IOC is anticipated between June and December 2000. MSD is scheduled for June 2000.

(9) Advanced Laser Eye Protective Visor. The ALEPV delivery schedule is currently being developed. Acquisition Milestone III is scheduled for March 2000. IOC is scheduled for July 2000.

(10) FLU-8B/P Automatic Inflation Device. Information is not currently available.

(11) LPU-32/P Life Preserver Assembly. Nine thousand LPU-32/P Life Preserver Assemblies were procured under contracts N00383-97-C-04P for the first 1,687 units and N00383-97-D-037P for the remainder, and delivery was completed in August 1999. IOC was achieved in April 1999. MSD was achieved in August 1996.

(12) LPU-33/P Low Profile Flotation Collar. Twelve thousand LPU-33/P LPFCs were procured under contract N68936-96-D-0300. IOC was achieved in August 1998. MSD was achieved in January 2000.

(13) LPU-34/P Low Profile Flotation Collar. Twelve thousand LPU-34/P LPFCs were procured under contract N68936-96-D-0300. IOC was achieved in February 1998. MSD was achieved in January 2000.

(14) SRU-40/P Helicopter Aircrew Breathing Device. Four thousand five hundred SRU-40/P HABDs were procured under contract N62269-95-C-0190. An additional 1,500 units were procured under contract N00421-97-C-1145. The last procurement was for 2,017 units under contract N00421-99-C-1225, delivering 500 units each on September 30 and October 30, 1999, and final delivery of 1,017 units was made on November 30, 1999. IOC was achieved in March 1998. MSD was achieved in December 1999.

(15) PCU-56/P Torso Harness. Initial contract delivery is complete. Currently, there are no active contracts for the PCU-56/P Torso Harness. Negotiations are underway for delivery of a total of 2,781 small, medium, and large harnesses. Continued delivery is through normal supply channels. IOC was achieved in February 1996 for the small model, and February 1997 for the medium and large models. MSD was achieved in February 1996 for the small model and in February 1997 for the medium and large models.

(16) Multi-Place Life Rafts. MPLRs are being procured through the GSA, and therefore MSD is not applicable. IOC is anticipated in August 2000.

b. Ready For Operational Use Schedule. All ALSS is ready for operational use upon delivery or completion of installation, as appropriate.

c. Time Required to Install at Operational Sites. NA

d. Foreign Military Sales and Other Source Delivery Schedule. Schedule information concerning FMS and other procurements may be obtained by contacting PMA202.

e. Training Device and Technical Training Equipment Delivery Schedule. ALSS is used as Technical Training Equipment (TTE), both directly and indirectly, at ASTCs and FRSs in all aspects of aircrew training. NATTC Pensacola employs ALSS as TTE in PR and MOS 6060 training courses. At MTUs and Fleet Replacement Enlisted Skills Training (FREST) departments, ALSS is used to train AME personnel, NEC 83XX, and Aircraft Safety Equipment Mechanics, MOS 6087. As new ALSS enters fleet service, these systems will be delivered to the appropriate training activities for use as TTE.

L. GOVERNMENT FURNISHED EQUIPMENT AND CONTRACTOR FURNISHED EQUIPMENT TRAINING REQUIREMENTS. NA

M. RELATED NTSPs AND OTHER APPLICABLE DOCUMENTS. NTSPs and other documents that affect, are related to, or were used to develop this NTSP are listed below.

DOCUMENT

OR NTSP TITLE

DOCUMENT

OR NTSP NUMBER

PDA

CODE

STATUS

AH-1W Aircraft

N88-NTSP-A-50-8520D/A

PMA276

Approved

Feb 96

AN/AVS-6(V) Aviators Night Vision Imaging System (ANVIS)

NTP A-50-8214D/D

PMA202

Draft

Dec 95

AN/AVS-9(V) Night Vision Image Intensifier Set

Initial NTSP

PMA202

Initial

Sep 99

AV-8B Harrier II Plus Weapon System

N88-NTSP-A-50-8210D/D

PMA257

Draft

Aug 99

Aviators Breathing Oxygen Surveillance System (ABOSS)

NTP A-50-8608/A

PMA202

Approved

Jun 89

C-2A Reprocured Aircraft

N88-NTSP-A-50-8308B/A

PMA231

Approved

Oct 96

Cats-Eyes MXU-810/U Night Vision System

NTP A-50-9304/A

PMA202

Approved

Nov 93

CH-53E Helicopter

NTP A-50-7604F/D

PMA261

Draft

Apr 95

CH-53 Helicopter Night Vision System

NTP A-50-9305/A

PMA202

Approved

Jan 94

E-2C Aircraft

N88-NTSP-A-50-8716D/A

PMA231

Approved

Dec 97

E-6A/B TACAMO Aircraft

N88-NTSP-A-50-8516D/D

PMA271

Draft

Mar 99

EA-6B Improved Capability Modification II

N88-NTSP-A-50-7904C/A

PMA234

Approved

Dec 96

EA-6B Improved Capability III

Initial NTSP

PMA299

Initial

Aug 98

EP-3E Aries II Aircraft

NTP A-50-8605D/D

PMA290

Draft

Apr 98

ES-3A Aircraft

A-50-8818C/P

PMA290

Proposed

Feb 96

F-14A, F-14B, and F-14D Aircraft

N88-NTSP-A-50-8511B/D

PMA241

Draft

Aug 98

F/A-18C/D Aircraft Weapon System

N88-NTSP-A-50-7703F/A

PMA265

Approved

Jan 97

F/A-18E/F Aircraft Weapon System

A-50-9201A/P

PMA265

Proposed

Apr 95

H-46 Helicopter

N88-NTSP-50-9409A/D

PMA226

Draft

Jul 98

HH-60H Combat SAR/SW Helicopter

A-50-8714B/A

PMA299

Approved

Dec 93

CH-60 Fleet Combat Support Helicopter

Initial NTSP

PMA276

Initial

May 98

HH/UH-1N Aircraft

A-50-9404/A

PMA276

Approved

Oct 94

USMC H-1 Upgrades Program

N88-NTSP-50-9602/A

PMA276

Approved

Dec 97

KC-130T Aircraft

A-50-8423/A

PMA200

Approved

Jun 85

USMC KC-130J Advanced Tanker

Initial NTSP

PMA200

Initial

Oct 98

C-130 Logistic Support Aircraft

N88-NTSP-R-50 9011B/A

PMA200

Approved

Apr 99

MH-53E Helicopter

N88-NTSP-A-50-8417C/D

PMA261

Draft

Jan 96

Navy Undergraduate Jet Flight Training System, T-45TS

A-50-8703B/D

PMA273

Draft

Feb 95

Naval Aviation Survival Training Program (NASTP)

N88-NTSP-A-50-9803/D

NOMI-6

Draft

Sep 99

Oxygen Enriched Air System (OEAS)

N88-NTSP-A-50-8603C/D

PMA202

Draft

Sep 99

P-3C Update III Anti-Surface Warfare Improvement Program Aircraft

N88-NTSP-A-50-8112B/A

PMA290

Approved

Jul 98

RH-53D Helicopter

A-50-8601B/A

PMA261

Approved

Mar 92

S-3B Aircraft

N88-A-50-8310D/P

PMA290

Proposed

Aug 99

SH-2G Helicopter

A-50-9303/A

PMA299

Approved

Jun 94

SH-60B LAMPS MKIII, Part B, Aircraft Subsystems

A-50-7702D/P

PMA299

Proposed

Oct 94

SH-60F Carrier Inner Zone ASW Helicopter

N88-NTSP-A-50-8508D/D

PMA299

Proposed

May 00

SH-60R Multi-Purpose Helicopter

A-50-9403/P

PMA299

Proposed

Jun 94

SH/UH-3H Helicopter Transition

A-50-8901/D

PMA225

Draft

May 94

SJU-17(V) Navy Aircrew Common Ejection Seat (NACES)

N88-NTSP-A-50-8517C/D

PMA202

Draft

Feb 99

V-22A Joint Training Plan

A-50-8412D/D

PMA275

Draft

Mar 99

VH-60 Executive Transport Helicopter

A-50-8612/A

PMA207

Approved

Feb 88

Navy Combat Edge ILSP

AS-ILSP-425

PMA202

Approved

Aug 94

Passenger Anti-Exposure Survival Suit ILSP

AS-ILSP-423

PMA202

Approved

Aug 94

AN/PRC-112 Survival Beacon ILSP

3673-4007-03

PMA202

Approved

Dec 87

ALEPV ILSP

TBD

PMA202

Draft

Dec 94

TTU-551/E Leakage Tester ULSS

NAWCADLKE-U70098031

PMA202

Approved

Aug 99



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