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APPROVED

NAVY TRAINING SYSTEM PLAN

FOR THE

AGM-88 HIGH-SPEED ANTI-RADIATION

MISSLE SYSTEM

N88-NTSP-A-50-8101B/A

SEPTEMBER 1999

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

The AGM-88 High-Speed Anti-Radiation Missile (HARM) System was developed in the 1980s as an air-to-ground, medium range missile designed to detect, attack, and suppress enemy radar installations. It was developed for the Navy, Marine Corps, and Air Force with the Navy as the lead service. The AGM-88 HARM System evolved from the AGM-45 Shrike and AGM-78 Standard Arm missiles, incorporating the more desirable features of each while providing additional features and enhanced capabilities. The AGM-88 HARM is in Phase III (Production, Deployment, and Operational Support) of the Weapons System Acquisition Process.

The AGM-88 HARM consists of guidance, warhead, control, and rocket motor sections, wings, and fins. The three versions of the AGM-88 HARM being used are the AGM-88A, AGM-88B, and the AGM-88C. All three versions are compatible with Navy and Marine Corps F/A-18 and EA-6B Aircraft and with Air Force F-16 Aircraft. Configurations of the AGM-88 HARM consist of changes in hardware and software referred to as either Block I, II, III, or IV. Configurations include: AGM-88A Blocks I and II, AGM-88B Blocks II and III, and AGM-88C Block IV. AGM-88B Block IIIA and AGM-88C Block V are to be incorporated starting Fiscal Year (FY)00. Initial Operating Capability was attained in 1983 for the AGM-88A, 1986 for the AGM-88B, and 1994 for the AGM-88C. An AGM-88D Block VI is planned for FY03. Information pertaining to the AGM-88D will be included in future iterations of this NTSP as information becomes available. Refer to the Program Manager, Air 242.

The AGM-88 HARM maintenance concept is based on an overall objective to assure All-Up-Rounds are available to fulfill commitments of operational activities and provide the means to restore unserviceable missiles to serviceable condition with minimal downtime. Maintenance requirements are allocated to the organizational, intermediate, and depot levels of maintenance as defined in the Naval Airborne Weapons Maintenance Program, OPNAVINST 8600.2B. Workload associated with the AGM-88 HARM Missile does not increase existing manning levels.

The HARM training concept is divided into organizational and intermediate level maintenance based on OPNAVINST 8600.2B. Operator training is provided to aviators, Weapons System Officers, and Electronic Countermeasures Officers at the appropriate Fleet Readiness Squadron. Platform weapons school organizational level training is provided to maintenance personnel at the appropriate Maintenance Training Unit (MTU) and Fleet Replacement Enlisted Skills Training activity. Intermediate level maintenance personnel are trained at the appropriate MTU.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Page

Executive Summary i

List of Acronyms iii

Preface vi

PART I - TECHNICAL PROGRAM DATA

A. Title-Nomenclature-Program I-1

B. Security Classification I-1

C. Manpower, Personnel, and Training Principals I-1

D. System Description I-2

E. Developmental Test and Operational Test I-2

F. Aircraft and/or Equipment/System/Subsystem Replaced I-2

G. Description of New Development I-2

H. Concepts I-4

I. On-Board (In-Service) Training I-13

J. Logistics Support I-15

K. Schedules I-16

    1. Government Furnished Equipment and Contractor Furnished Equipment

Training Requirements I-17

M. Related NTSPs and Other Applicable Documents I-17

PART II - BILLET AND PERSONNEL REQUIREMENTS II-1

PART III - TRAINING REQUIREMENTS III-1

PART IV - TRAINING LOGISTICS SUPPORT REQUIREMENTS IV-1

PART V - MPT MILESTONES V-1

PART VI - DECISION ITEMS/ACTION REQUIRED VI-1

PART VII - POINTS OF CONTACT VII-1

LIST OF ACRONYMS

AIMD

Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance Department

AFB

Air Force Base

AMTCS

Aviation Maintenance Training Continuum System

AO

Aviation Ordnanceman

AOB

Average Onboard

ATIR

Annual Training Input Requirement

AUR

All-Up-Round

   

CANTRAC

Catalog of Navy Training Courses

CATM

Captive Air Training Missile

CBT

Computer-Based Training

CEST

Classroom Explosive Ordnance Disposal System Trainer

CIN

Course Identification Number

CINCLANTFLT

Commander in Chief, Atlantic Fleet

CINCPACFLT

Commander in Chief, Pacific Fleet

CMC

Commandant of the Marine Corps

CNET

Chief of Naval Education and Training

CNO

Chief of Naval Operations

COMNAVAIRESFOR

Commander, Naval Air Reserve Force

CV

Aircraft Carrier

CVN

Multi-Purpose Aircraft Carrier, Nuclear

CWTPI

Conventional Weapon Technical Proficiency Inspection

   

DATM

Dummy Air Training Missile

DOP

Designated Overhaul Point

DT

Developmental Test

   

ECMO

Electronic Countermeasures Officer

EEPROM

Electronically Erasable Program, Read Only Memory

ELCOMWEPSCOL

Electronic Attack Weapons School

EOD

Explosive Ordnance Disposal

EODTEU

EOD Training and Evaluation Unit

   

FMS

Foreign Military Sales

FREST

Fleet Replacement Enlisted Skills Training

FRS

Fleet Readiness Squadron

FY

Fiscal Year

   

HARM

High-Speed Anti-Radiation Missile

   

ICAP

Improved Capability

ILSP

Integrated Logistics Support Plan

IOC

Initial Operating Capability

   

LHA

Landing Ship, Helicopter Assault

LHD

Multi-Purpose Amphibious Assault Ship

   

MALS

Marine Aviation Logistics Squadron

MATMEP

Maintenance Aviation Training Management and Evaluation Program

MCAS

Marine Corps Air Station

MCCDC

Marine Corps Combat Development Command

MCO

Marine Corps Order

MLAG

Missile Loader Adapter Group

MLV

Memory Loader Verifier

MOS

Military Occupational Specialty

MSD

Material Support Date

MTIP

Maintenance Training Improvement Program

MTU

Maintenance Training Unit

   

NA

Not Applicable

NAMTRAGRU DET

Naval Air Maintenance Training Group Detachment

NAS

Naval Air Station

NATEC

Naval Air Technical Data and Engineering Service Command

NAVPERSCOM

Navy Personnel Command

NAVSCOLEOD

Naval School, Explosive Ordnance Disposal

NAVSURFWARCEN

Naval Surface Warfare Center

NAVAIRWARCENWPNDIV

Naval Air Warfare Center Weapons Division

NAWMU

Naval Airborne Weapons Maintenance Unit

NEC

Navy Enlisted Classification

NS

Naval Station

NTSP

Navy Training System Plan

NWAS

Naval Weapons Air Station

NWS

Naval Weapons Station

   

OLSP

Operational Logistics Support Plan

OPNAVINST

Office of the Chief of Naval Operations Instruction

OPO

OPNAV Principal Officer

OT

Operational Test

   

PDA

Principal Development Agency

PEST

Practical Explosives Ordnance Disposal System Trainer

PMA

Program Manager, Air

PQS

Personnel Qualification Standards

PTT

Part Task Trainer

   

RF

Radio Frequency

RFT

Ready for Training

RSP

Render Safe Procedure

   

SELRES

Selected Reserve

SFTP

Strike Fighter Training Program

SIST

Serviceable In Service Time

STRKFIGHTWPNSCOL

Strike Fighter Weapons School

   

TA

Training Agency

TD

Training Device

TSA

Training Support Agency

TTE

Technical Training Equipment

   

USMC

United States Marine Corps

USS

United States Ship

   

VMAT

Marine Attack Training Squadron

   

WSO

Weapons System Officer

 

PREFACE

This Approved Navy Training System Plan (NTSP) for the AGM-88 High-Speed Anti-Radiation Missile (HARM) System was prepared as part of the regular NTSP update process within the guidelines set forth in OPNAVINST 1500.76. This NTSP reflects the changes that have occurred since the Draft AGM-88 HARM Missile System NTSP, A-50-8101B/D, dated July 1998. The major changes and updates in this NTSP consist of:

PART I Shows deletion of outdated information; incorporation of changes to formal training; updated Training Device allocation listings; deletion and relocation of training sites due to decisions made by the Base Realignment Commission; and the impacts of Marine Corps Military Occupational Specialty (MOS) consolidations. References to the AGM-88D Block VI planned for FY03 have been removed. When this information becomes available it will be included in future iterations of this NTSP. Refer to the Program Manager, Air (PMA) 242.

PART II Recalculated to depict current billet requirements of fleet support units through Fiscal Year (FY) 04.

PART III In addition to reflecting the changes mentioned above, this part has been recalculated to depict chargeable student billets through FY04.

PART IV Reflects the changes in training and training logistics support requirements.

PART V Updated to include the major milestones.

PART VI Identifies significant equipment shortfalls at Marine Attack Training Squadron (VMAT) 203 Marine Corps Air Station (MCAS) Cherry Point, North Carolina, for intermediate training course C-646-3105.

PART VII Updated to reflect current Points of Contact.

N88-NTSP-A-50-8101B/A

September 1999

PART I - TECHNICAL PROGRAM DATA

A. TITLE-NOMENCLATURE-PROGRAM

1. Title-Nomenclature-Acronym. AGM-88 High-Speed Anti-Radiation Missile (HARM) System

2. Program Element. 0205601N

B. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION

1. System Characteristics Confidential

2. Capabilities Secret

3. Functions Unclassified

C. MANPOWER, PERSONNEL, AND TRAINING PRINCIPALS

OPNAV Principal Official (OPO) Program Sponsor CNO (N880D6)

OPO Resource Sponsor CNO (N880D6)

Marine Corps Program Sponsor CMC (ASL-30)

Developing Agency NAVAIRSYSCOM (PMA242)

Training Agency CINCLANTFLT (N-721)

CINCPACFLT (N-73)

CNET (T251)

COMNAVAIRESFOR

MCCDC (C462)

Training Support Agency NAVAIRSYSCOM (PMA205)

COMNAVAIRESFOR

Manpower and Personnel Mission Sponsor CNO (N12)

NAVPERSCOM (PERS-4B, PERS-404)

CMC (ASM, ASL)

Director of Naval Training CNO (N7)

Manpower Structure Management MCCDC (C5325C)

D. SYSTEM DESCRIPTION

1. Operational Uses. The AGM-88 HARM System, referred to in this document as the AGM-88A, AGM-88B, or AGM-88C when describing each specific configuration, or the HARM when referring to all configurations, was developed as an air-to-surface missile used to suppress or destroy enemy land or sea-based radar emitters. It is intended for use against radar-guided Surface-to-Air Missile systems, Anti-Aircraft Artillery systems, and other land and sea-based electromagnetic emitters. The HARM has a broadband capability that enables a single missile to engage any anticipated air defense or associated surface radar. It is currently carried on Navy and Marine Corps F/A-18 and EA-6B Aircraft. The Air Force employs the HARM on F-16 Aircraft.

2. Foreign Military Sales. The HARM has been sold to the Federal Republic of Germany, Italy, Spain, Hellenic Air Force (Greece), Turkey, and South Korea. For more information on Foreign Military Sales (FMS) refer to PMA242.

E. DEVELOPMENTAL TEST AND OPERATIONAL TEST. Navy AGM-88A Developmental Test (DT) was completed in October 1980, and Operational Test (OT) was completed in November 1982. AGM-88B Block II DT was completed in August 1986 and Follow-on Test and Evaluation was completed in August 1987. AGM-88B Block III DT and OT were completed in December 1989. AGM-88C Block IV DT was completed in October 1991, and OT was completed in December 1992. The AGM-88B Block IIIA and AGM-88C Block V DTs were completed in November 1998 and OT is planned for completion in May 1999.

F. AIRCRAFT AND/OR EQUIPMENT/SYSTEM/SUBSYSTEM REPLACED. Not Applicable (NA)

G. DESCRIPTION OF NEW DEVELOPMENT

1. Functional Description. The HARM is a rail-launched, supersonic, passive homing, air-to-surface missile capable of detecting, acquiring, and destroying hostile Radio Frequency (RF) emitters. Elements of the HARM System include the missile, launch aircraft and associated avionics systems, and launcher. The HARM receives target parameters from the launch aircraft prior to launch. The HARM uses these parameters and relevant attitude data to process incoming RF energy to acquire and guide the HARM to the desired target. Additional unique features include the high speed, low smoke, rocket motor and seeker sensitivity that enable the missile to easily attack sidelobes and backlobes of an emitter. The following provides functional descriptions for each section of the HARM and significant enhancements.

a. Guidance Section. Several modifications have been made to the HARM Guidance section through hardware modifications and software upgrades.

(1) Hardware Configurations. The AGM-88A was the first version of the missile to be produced. It incorporated a fuzible-link memory that required the guidance section to be returned to the manufacturer to change the tactical software. The AGM-88B was developed in 1980 and incorporated an Electronically Erasable Program, Read Only Memory (EEPROM) that allowed changing the missile software in the field. The AGM-88C is the latest fielded version and incorporates several new design features and is also reprogrammable in the field.

(2) Software Versions. Block I software was the original tactical software used with the AGM-88A. Block II software provided guidance and fuzing improvements and was used in both the AGM-88A and AGM-88B. In 1990, Block III software was installed in the AGM-88B to counter the capabilities of the advanced threats. All AGM-88C contained Block IV software, which is currently the latest version.

b. Warhead Section. The warhead section is designed to inflict sufficient damage on the target antenna and waveguide system to force an inoperative condition. It also ensures complete destruction of the HARM guidance section. The AGM-88A and AGM-88B warhead section (WAU-7/B) contains 25,000 pre-formed steel fragments, an explosive charge, a fuze, and a fuze booster. The AGM-88C utilizes an improved warhead section (WAU-27/B) containing 12,845 tungsten fragments and an improved explosive charge that provides greater overall lethality.

c. Control Section. The control section of the HARM is located aft of the warhead section. The control section contains wing actuators to steer the missile on a desired trajectory, missile captive and free flight electrical power supply equipment, attitude reference equipment, and the target detection device. An umbilical connector mounted on top of the control section provides electrical interface between the launch aircraft and the missile. The control sections used for the AGM-88A, AGM-88B, and AGM-88C variants are essentially the same and can be used by any variant.

d. Rocket Motor Section. Thrust for the HARM is developed by a dual thrust rocket motor utilizing a low smoke propellant. The rocket motor section contains a manually operated safety-arming device, igniter, propellant grain, and a fixed nozzle. External components on the rocket motor section consist of fittings for the fins, launch lugs, and a detent rib.

e. Wings. The wings direct the course of the HARM in flight by internally controlled actuators within the control section. Four wings are required per missile.

f. Fins. The BSU-60/B and BSU-60A/B fins are identical type fins except for a redesigned locking mechanism. They are interchangeable as sets. The fins provide aerodynamic stability of the HARM during flight.

2. Physical Description. The dimensions and weight of the HARM are as follows:

Length 164 inches

Diameter 10 inches

Wing span 44 inches

Fin span 24 inches

Weight 810 pounds

3. New Development. The HARM was introduced as new production. The HARM is in Phase III (Production, Deployment, and Operational Support) of the Weapon System Acquisition Process. The AGM-88A was introduced to the fleet and achieved Initial Operating Capability (IOC) in FY83. The AGM-88B was introduced to the fleet and achieved IOC in FY86. The AGM-88C was introduced into the fleet and achieved IOC FY94.

4. Significant Interfaces

a. Avionics. The HARM interfaces with the CP-1001C Command Launch Computer on the F/A-18 aircraft and the HARM Control Panel on the EA-6B aircraft.

b. Launcher. The LAU-118(V)2A launcher provides the launch platform for the HARM. The launcher provides the electrical and mechanical link between the aircraft pylon and the missile.

5. New Features, Configurations, or Material. The AGM-88B Block IIIA and AGM-88C Block V software upgrades are currently in development and planned for incorporation beginning in FY00.

H. CONCEPTS

1. Operational Concept. The HARM is employed in air-to-surface combat missions by the aircrew.

2. Maintenance Concept. Maintenance of the HARM employed on the F/A-18 and EA-6B aircraft is accomplished using the basic maintenance philosophy outlined in OPNAVINST 4790.2G, and specific weapons maintenance instructions outlined in OPNAVINST 8600.2B.

a. Organizational. Organizational level maintenance units receive the HARM as an All-Up-Round (AUR). Organizational level maintenance is performed in Work Center 230, which is manned by Navy Aviation Ordnanceman (AO) with Navy Enlisted Classifications (NECs) 8332 (EA-6B), 8342 (F/A-18), and 8842 (F/A-18) or Marine Corps Aviation Ordnance Technician, MOS 6531 (EA-6B and F/A-18). Organizational level maintenance tasks include:

    • Aircraft and weapon system inspections
    • Aircraft and weapon system release and control system checks
    • Weapon uploading and downloading
    • Installing and removing wings and fins
    • Weapon arming and dearming
    • On-aircraft weapon test
    • Discrepancy reporting
    • Complying with Technical Directives
    • Record keeping and reporting

b. Intermediate. Intermediate Maintenance Activity Weapons Departments (shipboard, Naval Air Stations (NAS), and Marine Aviation Logistics Squadrons (MALS)) receive AURs from the Naval Weapons Station (NWS), MCAS, Letterkenny Army Depot, or Naval Airborne Weapons Maintenance Unit (NAWMU) and launchers from the supply system or Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance Department (AIMD). HARM Missile maintenance is performed by Weapons Department Navy AOs with NEC 6801 and Marines with MOS 6541. AIMD Work Center 710 Navy AOs with NECs 6802 and 6803 and Marines with MOS 6541 functionally test the launchers. Weapons Department intermediate level maintenance tasks include:

    • Visual inspection for damage and corrosion
    • Performing corrosion control
    • De-canning and canning of the AUR
    • Ready service inspection
    • Record keeping and reporting
    • Preparing the AUR for shipping or storage
    • Installing and removing the LAU-118(V)2A Launcher
    • Technical Directive implementation
    • Delivering the missile to the organizational activity

c. Depot. OPNAVINST 8600.2B divides depot level into two sub-levels of maintenance: Organic and Designated Overhaul Point (DOP).

(1) Letterkenny Army Depot. Letterkenny Army Depot is the depot level AUR maintenance activity for the HARM. NWSs also serve as the DOPs for containers, wings, and fins. NWS maintenance tasks include:

    • Visual inspection for damage and corrosion
    • Fault isolation by AUR test to faulty section
    • Repair by replacement of failed sections and external components
    • Performing corrosion control
    • Containerizing the AUR for storage or loadout
    • Technical Directive implementation
    • Software loading
    • Recertification of the AUR by retest
    • Record keeping and reporting
    • Minor container repair

(2) Designated Overhaul Point. The DOP is responsible for maintenance beyond the capabilities of the NWS (depot level AUR) activities, including major overhaul or complete rebuild of sections or subassemblies required to restore defective sections and repairable Shop Replaceable Assemblies to original acceptance standards. Depot level maintenance is performed on sections, assemblies, and subassemblies. Serviceable sections and components repaired by the DOP are returned to the Letterkenny Army Depot. The DOP for rocket motors is Naval Surface Warfare Center (NAVSURFWARCEN) Indian Head, Maryland. Raytheon Corporation (formerly Texas Instruments Defense Systems and Electronics) Tucson, Arizona, is serving as the DOP for the HARM guidance and control sections and Peculiar Support Equipment.

d. Interim Maintenance. NA

e. Life-Cycle Maintenance Plan. The HARM has an indefinite Serviceable In Service Time (SIST). Due to the inherent high reliability and indefinite SIST of the HARM, it is anticipated that AUR maintenance requirements will not be required until after FY06.

3. Manning Concept. The HARM has no impact on existing manpower requirements at organizational, intermediate, or depot level activities. Pilot, Weapons System Officer (WSO), and Electronic Countermeasures Officer (ECMO) manpower is driven by seat factor and crew ratio. Enlisted manning for Navy and Marine Corps fleet squadrons, Fleet Readiness Squadrons (FRS), and intermediate maintenance activities is based on the total assigned workload, not only on specific HARM requirements. Skills required to support the HARM are considered to be within the capability of existing NECs and MOSs. Refer to Part II for existing Navy and Marine Corps intermediate maintenance manpower requirements.

4. Training Concept. The HARM training concept is divided into organizational and intermediate levels. Organizational level training is provided to aircrew and maintenance personnel. Operator training is provided for aviators, WSOs, and ECMOs at the appropriate FRS and Platform Weapons Schools. Organizational level maintenance training is provided to AO personnel in the EA-6B community with NEC 8332 and MOS 6531; in the FA-18 community with NECs 8342 and 8842 and MOS 6531 at the appropriate Maintenance Training Units (MTUs) and Fleet Replacement Enlisted Skills Training (FREST) activity. Intermediate level training is provided to Navy maintenance personnel with NEC 6801 and Marine Corps personnel with MOS 6541 at the appropriate MTU or FREST activity.

The established training concept for most aviation maintenance training divides "A" School courses into two or more segments called Core and Strand. The "C" School courses are also divided into separate Initial and Career training courses. "A" School Core courses include general knowledge and skills training for the particular rating, while "A" School Strand courses focus on the more specialized training requirements for that rating and a specific aircraft or equipment, based on the student's fleet activity destination. Strand training immediately follows Core training and is part of the "A" School. Upon completion of Core and Strand "A" School, graduates attend the appropriate Initial "C" School for additional specific training. Initial "C" School training is intended for students with a paygrade of E-4 and below. Career "C" School training is provided for E-5 and above personnel to enhance skills and knowledge within their field.

Selected Reserve (SELRES) training is conducted by the Naval Air Reserve at each squadron site per current Commander, Naval Air Reserve Force (COMNAVAIRESFOR) instructions. The training is segmented and tailored for use by SELRES personnel during weekend drill periods and two-week active duty periods. If SELRES personnel and training quotas are available, COMNAVAIRESFOR must coordinate with appropriate quota controls to get training quotas at the FRSs.

a. Initial Training. All initial training has been completed. No further initial training is planned.

b. Follow-on Training. Follow-on training for the HARM is available as part of courses taught at FRSs, MTUs, FREST facilities, Electronic Attack Weapons School (ELCOMWEPSCOL), Marine Aviation Weapons Tactics, School-One, and Strike Fighter Weapons Schools (STRKFIGHTWPNSCOL). The HARM causes no change in student throughput or chargeable student billets. Follow-on training courses have all been modified to include the HARM and are currently on-line.

(1) Operator. Aviators, WSOs, and ECMOs get basic training at the appropriate FRS for specific aircraft operation. Operator skills in tactics and ordnance delivery are taught at the STRKFIGHTWPNSCOLs, ELCOMWEPSCOL, HARM University, and through Aviator and Squadron proficiency training. The Strike Fighter Training Program (SFTP) is a new strategy designed to support fleet aircrew training requirements. The SFTP consists of the Strike Fighter Weapons and Tactics syllabus, Strike Fighter Tactics Instructor, and Strike Fighter Training System. The SFTP is used to accomplish the following:

    • Organize existing training efforts
    • Target training efforts toward a standardized set of Strike Fighter learning objectives
    • Develop appropriate high quality, standardized training media
    • Distribute the training media throughout the community for presentation

The EA-6B community has recently initiated a similar training called Prowler Tactics Instructor.

Training Devices (TD) required for follow-on and proficiency operator training include the Part Task Trainer (PTT) and the Captive Air Training Missile (CATM).

  • Part Task Trainer. The PTT is a computer-based system developed by the Naval Air Warfare Center Weapons Division (NAVAIRWARCENWPNDIV) China Lake for use by F/A-18 aviators. The PTT provides missile and operational procedure familiarization as well as proficiency training in launch and control techniques.
  • Captive Air Training Missile. The CATM-88A/B/C are now in fleet use and are physically identical to the AGM-88A/B/C tactical missiles except for the warhead and rocket motor which are both inert. These training missiles are used to train aircrews in recognition and acquisition of targets.

The following table lists the applicable operator training courses. The HARM source material has been incorporated in these courses with minimal impact. The HARM causes no change in student throughput or chargeable student billets and therefore, these courses will not appear in Parts II and III.

COURSE

NUMBER

 

COURSE TITLE

RFT DATE INCLUDING HARM

E-2A-1815

EA-6B Improved Capability (ICAP) II Fleet Replacement Pilot Category 1

On-line

E-2A-1816

EA-6B ICAP II Fleet Replacement Pilot Category 2

On-line

E-2A-1817

EA-6B ICAP II Fleet Replacement Pilot Category 3

On-line

E-2A-1818

EA-6B ICAP II Fleet Replacement Pilot Category 4

On-line

E-2A-1819

Medium Attack Strike Training

On-line

E-2D-1817

EA-6B ICAP II Fleet Replacement ECMO Category 1

On-line

E-2D-1818

EA-6B ICAP II Fleet Replacement ECMO Category 2

On-line

E-2D-1819

EA-6B ICAP II Fleet Replacement ECMO Category 3

On-line

E-2D-1820

EA-6B ICAP II Fleet Replacement ECMO Category 4

On-line

D/E-2A-0601

F/A-18 Fleet Replacement Pilot Category 1

On-line

D/E-2A-0602

F/A-18 Fleet Replacement Pilot Category 2A

On-line

D/E-2A-0604

F/A-18 Fleet Replacement Pilot Category 3A

On-line

D/E-2A-0606

F/A-18 Fleet Replacement Pilot Category 4

On-line

None (USMC)

F/A-18 Fleet Replacement Pilot Category 1

On-line

None (USMC)

F/A-18 Fleet Replacement Pilot Category 2

On-line

None (USMC)

F/A-18 Fleet Replacement Pilot Category 3

On-line

None (USMC)

F/A-18 Fleet Replacement Pilot Category 4

On-line

None (USMC)

F/A-18 (WSO) Category 1

On-line

None (USMC)

F/A-18 (WSO) Category 2

On-line

None (USMC)

F/A-18 (WSO) Category 3

On-line

None (USMC)

F/A-18 (WSO) Category 4

On-line

(2) Organizational Maintenance. Organizational level maintenance personnel are trained at the appropriate MTU or FREST for specific aircraft maintenance. Weapon loading skills are further enhanced at ELCOMWEPSCOL, SRKFIGHTWPNSCOL, and through onboard proficiency training. TDs required for follow-on and proficiency training include the CATM and the Dummy Air Training Missile (DATM).

  • Dummy Air Training Missile. The DATM is a mechanical model of the HARM and is capable of simulating ground and shipboard handling procedures for the purpose of load crew training. The control section and guidance section are externally the same as the tactical missile but are ballast weighted. The warhead and rocket motor are identical to the warhead and rocket motor used in the CATM except for a color band. The design includes the capability to remove and replace wings and fins, to connect and disconnect the umbilical cable, and to simulate rocket motor arming and dearming. The DATM is not certified for flight.
  • Dummy Guidance Section. The dummy guidance section (WGU-2(D-2)/A) provides a non-functioning guidance section with the same shape, weight, and center of gravity as the WGU-2/B. It is used with the DATM.
  • Dummy Control Section. The dummy control section (WCU-2(D-2)/A) provides a non-functioning control section with the same shape, weight, and center of gravity as the WCU-2/B. It is used with the DATM. It also has an umbilical cable and training target detector.

The HARM is taught in "A" school and in the following organizational level maintenance training courses. HARM source material has been incorporated in these courses with minimal impact. The HARM causes no change in student throughput or chargeable student billets and, therefore, these courses will not appear in Parts II and III.

COURSE NUMBER

 

COURSE TITLE

TRACK NUMBER

RFT DATE INCLUDING HARM

C-646-9741

EA-6B Armament Systems Organizational Maintenance

D/E-646-1840

On-line

E-646-1842

EA-6B HARM Loading

 

On-line

C-646-9973

F/A-18 Stores Management System (Initial) Organizational Maintenance

D/E-646-0653

D/E-646-0654

On-line

D/E-646-0640

F/A-18 Conventional Weapons Loading

D/E-646-0641

D/E 646-0653

D/E 646-0654

On-line

C-646-9974

F/A-18 Stores Management System Organizational Maintenance (Career)

D/E-646-0641

On-line

D/E-646-0647

F/A-18 Conventional Release System Test

D/E-646-0653

On-line

(3) Intermediate Maintenance. Intermediate maintenance training is available for Navy and Marine Corps Aviation Ordnance personnel through the appropriate MTU or FREST. The TD required for intermediate maintenance training is the DATM. Refer to element IV.A.2 for detailed information. The following courses have been updated to include HARM data:

Title ...................

Air Launched Guided Missiles Intermediate Maintenance

CIN ....................

C-122-3111 (part of D/E-646-7007)

Model Manager...

MTU 4030 NAMTRAGRU DET Norfolk, Virginia

Description ...

This course provides ordnance personnel with knowledge of the Sparrow, Sidewinder, Phoenix, Sidearm, Maverick, Harpoon, Standoff Land Attack Missile, High-Speed Anti-Radiation Missile, Walleye, Tactical Air-Launched Decoy, and Air Nitrogen Purifier Units.

Location ............

MTU 4030 NAMTRAGRU DET, Mayport

MTU 4032 NAMTRAGRU DET, Norfolk

MTU 4033 NAMTRAGRU DET, North Island

MTU 4035 NAMTRAGRU DET, Whidbey Island, Washington

Length ................

12 days

RFT date ............

Currently available

Skill identifier .....

AO 6801 awarded upon completion of track D/E-646-7007

TTE/TD .............

M-34 DATM

Prerequisite .........

C-646-2011, Aviation Ordnanceman Common Core Class A1 C-646-2012, Aviation Ordnanceman Weapons Department Strand Class A1

Title ...................

Aviation Ordnance Intermediate Maintenance Technician

CIN ....................

C-646-3105 (part of M-646-7026)

Model Manager ..

NAMTRAGRU DET 4034, Marine Attack Training Squadron (VMAT)-203 FREST, MCAS Cherry Point

Description .........

This course provides ordnance personnel with knowledge required by USMC personnel working on ordnance/armament in the Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance Department environment.

Location .............

VMAT-203 FREST, MCAS Cherry Point

Length ................

73 days

RFT date ............

Currently available

Skill identifier .....

MOS 6541 awarded upon completion of track M-646-7026

TTE/TD .............

M-34 DATM

Prerequisite .........

C-646-2011, Aviation Ordnanceman Common Core Class A1

C-646-2012, Aviation Ordnanceman Airwing Strand Class A1

(4) Explosive Ordnance Disposal Training. Explosive Ordnance Disposal Training is conducted at the Naval Explosive Ordnance Disposal School, Eglin Air Force Base (AFB), Florida. The TDs required for EOD training are the PEST and the Classroom Explosive System Trainer (CEST):

    • Practical Explosive Ordnance Disposal System Trainer. The PEST is a full-scale model fabricated from actual hardware, having approximately the same weight and center of gravity as the tactical missile. The PEST is used for teaching Rendering Safe Procedure.
    • Classroom Explosive System Trainer. The CEST is an inert cutaway model displaying locations and types of explosive and hazardous materials, initiators, igniters, and fuze.

The following table lists the applicable EOD training courses. The Hellfire Modular Missile System source material will be incorporated in these courses with minimal impact. This will cause no change in student throughput or chargeable student billets

EXPLOSIVE ORDNANCE DISPOSAL COURSES

COURSE

NUMBER

COURSE TITLE

RFT DATE

A-431-0011

Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) Phase II (Navy)

On-line

A-431-0012

Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) Phase II

On-line

G-431-0001

EOD Pre-deployment Team Training

On-line

c. Student Profiles

SKILL IDENTIFIER

PREREQUISITE SKILL AND KNOWLEDGE REQUIREMENTS

AO 6801

C-646-2011, Aviation Ordnanceman Common Core Class A1

C-646-2013, Aviation Ordnanceman Weapons Department Strand Class A1

MOS 6541

C-646-2011, Aviation Ordnanceman Common Core Class A1

C-646-2012, Aviation Ordnanceman Airwing Strand Class A1

d. Training Pipelines. The following training tracks apply and are available in the OPNAV Training Management System:

TRACK NUMBER

TRACK TITLE

D/E-646-7007

General Shipboard/NAS Weapons Department Aviation Ordnance Maintenance

M-646-7026

Aviation Ordnance Technician Intermediate Maintenance

I. ONBOARD (IN-SERVICE) TRAINING

1. Proficiency or Other Training Organic to the New Development. Aviator, ECMO, and WSO weapons proficiency training is accomplished in three steps: Academic, Simulator, and Captive Carry:

  • Academic. Selected squadron aircrewmen receive in-depth classroom weapon training from an appropriate source (contractor, weapons school, etc.) to become the squadron subject matter expert on the HARM. HARM University conducted at the HARM Program Office at NAVAIRWARCENWPNDIV China Lake is designed as the prime subject matter course for aircrew. Engineers, Integration Experts, and STRKFIGHTPNSCOL instructors provide classroom training. Aircrew personnel then receive academic training within their squadron from the HARM subject matter expert. As an option to this step, all squadron aircrew personnel would attend an academic class held at the appropriate weapons school.
  • Simulator. The appropriate weapons tactical trainer is set up by the squadron Weapons School for aircrew personnel to gain required proficiency prior to captive carry of the HARM.
  • Captive Carry. The CATM is loaded on an aircraft at which time aircrew personnel gain proficiency and final qualification on the HARM.

a. Maintenance Training Improvement Program. The Maintenance Training Improvement Program (MTIP) is used to establish an effective and efficient training system responsive to fleet training requirements. MTIP is a training management tool that, through diagnostic testing, identifies individual training deficiencies at the organizational and intermediate levels of maintenance. MTIP is the comprehensive testing of one's knowledge. It consists of a bank of test questions managed through automated data processing. The Deputy Chief of Staff for Training assisted in development of MTIP by providing those question banks (software) already developed by the Navy. MTIP was implemented per OPNAVINST 4790.2 series. MTIP allows increased effectiveness in the application of training resources through identification of skills and knowledge deficiencies at the activity, work center, or individual technician level. Refresher training is concentrated where needed to improve identified skill and knowledge shortfalls. MTIP will be replaced by the Aviation Maintenance Training Continuum System (AMTCS). Current planning is for AMTCS to begin initial implementation in third quarter FY00.

COMNAVAIRPAC has discontinued using MTIP. They are currently using maintenance data products as a source to determine maintenance training deficiencies until AMTCS is implemented.

b. Aviation Maintenance Training Continuum System. AMTCS will provide career path training to the sailor or marine from their initial service entry to the end of their military career. AMTCS is planned to be an integrated system that will satisfy the training and administrative requirements of both the individual and the organization. The benefits will be manifested in the increased effectiveness of the technicians and the increased efficiencies of the management of the training business process. By capitalizing on technological advances and integrating systems and processes where appropriate, the right amount of training can be provided at the right time, thus meeting the Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) mandated "just-in-time" training approach.

Technology investments enable the development of several state-of-the-art training and administrative tools: Computer-Based Training (CBT) for the technicians in the Fleet in the form of ICW with Computer Managed Instruction (CMI) and Computer Aided Instruction (CAI) for the schoolhouse.

Included in the AMTCS development effort is the Aviation Maintenance Training Continuum System - Software Module (ASM) which provides testing [Test and Evaluation (TEV)], recording [Electronic Training Jacket (ETJ)], and a Feedback system. The core functionality of these AMTCS tools are based and designed around the actual maintenance-related tasks the technicians perform, and the tasks are stored and maintained in a Master Task List (MTL) data bank. These tools are procured and fielded with appropriate COTS hardware and software, i.e. Fleet Training Devices (FTD) - Laptops, PCs, Electronic Classrooms (ECR), Learning Resource Centers (LRC), operating software, and network software and hardware.

Upon receipt of direction from OPNAV (N889H), AMTCS is to be implemented and the new tools integrated into the daily training environment of all participating aviation activities and supporting elements. AMTCS will serve as the standard training system for aviation maintenance training within the Navy and Marine Corps, and is planned to supersede the existing MTIP and Maintenance Training Management and Evaluation Program (MATMEP) programs.

2. Personnel Qualification Standards. OPNAVINST 8023.2C outlines requirements for Personnel Qualification Standard (PQS), NAVEDTRA 43202 series. This PQS is required by all personnel who handle Non-nuclear Explosive Ordnance Shipboard Handling and Stowage.

3. Other Onboard or In-service Training Packages. Marine Corps onboard training is based on the current series of Marine Corps Order (MCO) P4790.12, Individual Training Standards System and Marine Aviation Training Management Evaluation Program (MATMEP). This program is designed to meet Marine Corps, as well as Navy OPNAVINST 4790.2G, maintenance training requirements. It is a performance-based, standardized, level-progressive, documentable, training management and evaluation program. It identifies and prioritizes task inventories by MOS through a front-end analysis process that identifies task, skill, and knowledge requirements of each MOS. MTIP questions coupled to MATMEP tasks will help identify training deficiencies that can be addressed with refresher training.

The Conventional Weapon Technical Proficiency Inspection (CWTPI) is a graded inspection administered by either STRKFIGHTWPNSCOL NAS Lemoore, California, or NAS Cecil Field, Florida, for the F/A-18 aircraft and ELCOMWEPSCOL, NAS Whidbey Island, Washington, for the EA-6B. The CWTPI covers all areas of conventional weapon load and release, and control systems checks. The inspection evaluates the squadron's ability to correctly wire-check, upload and download conventional ordnance, use applicable publications, and place ordnance on its designated target. The squadron inspection is conducted annually, six months prior to deployment, or at the request of the squadron's Commanding Officer. All personnel directly involved in the inspection, including squadron aviators, require a written examination. A 72-hour time limit is granted for the completion of the entire evolution. The final grade is an average score derived from the written exams, ordnance loads, wire-checks, and the aviator's proficiency to deliver weapons on target. Pre-inspection training is provided by the appropriate STRKFIGHTWPNSCOL for the F/A-18 and ELCOMWEPSCOL for the EA-6B, followed by the CWTPI. The CWTPI determines the need for further conventional weapons load training of squadron AO and Aviation Electronics Technician personnel.

Headquarters, Marine Corps, schedules the USMC activities yearly for Marine Corps Combat Readiness Evaluation. Marine Corps activities participate in war exercises and are evaluated. Training is an on-going Marine Corps evolution that culminates with the Combat Readiness Evaluation. The evaluation determines the need for further conventional weapons load training of squadron personnel.

J. LOGISTICS SUPPORT

1. Manufacturer and Contract Numbers

CONTRACT NUMBER

MANUFACTURER

ADDRESS

N00019-97-D-0124

Raytheon Corporation

Tucson, Arizona

2. Program Documentation. The latest version of the Operational Logistic Support Plan (OLSP) is AIR-418 MS-068, Change 11, July 1994. This document has been replaced by the approved HARM Integrated Logistics Support Plan (ILSP) dated October 1998.

3. Technical Data Plan. Raytheon Corporation, the HARM production contractor, will provide peculiar technical manual source data to the Naval Air Technical Data and Engineering Service Command (NATEC), which will promulgate changes to existing HARM manuals.

4. Test Sets, Tools, and Test Equipment. Test sets, tools, and test equipment for organizational level maintenance consist of common tools and test equipment. The following test equipment is utilized at the intermediate and depot level maintenance activities:

NOMENCLATURE

MODEL

USE

Missile Test Set

AN/DSM-160B

Tests AURs and fault isolates to individual missile sections.

Simulator Group Calibration Set

AN/DSM-158A

Performs all RF calibration required to support the missile test set.

Calibration Test Set

AN/DSM-161B

Calibrates the missile test set.

Guided Missile Test Set

AN/GSM-396

Tests AURs, fault isolates to individual missile sections, and reprograms.

Memory Loader Verifier (MLV)

AN/DSM-607(V)7

Reprograms the missile software.

Missile Loader Adapter Group (MLAG)

OF195/ASM-607(V)

Interfaces between the MLV and the missile.

5. Repair Parts. The MSD for the HARM was October 1983. Repair parts are available through the Navy supply system. Normal replenishment procedures based upon demand and usage are used to maintain stock levels of spares, repair parts, and consumables.

6. Human Systems Integration. NA

K. SCHEDULES

1. Schedule of Events

a. Installation and Delivery Schedules. The HARM inventories and planned delivery schedules contained in the Weapon System Planning Document are classified.

b. Ready For Operational Use Schedule. The HARM is currently Ready for Operational Use.

c. Time Required to Install at Operational Sites. The HARM is delivered to the fleet as an AUR and requires no time to install.

d. Foreign Military Sales and Other Source Delivery Schedule. The HARM has been sold to the Federal Republic of Germany, Italy, Spain, Turkey, Greece, and South Korea. For more information on FMS contact PMA242.

e. Training Device and Delivery Schedule. Training Missiles are available for captive training and load drill training. DATMs were produced and delivered from 1983 through 1986. For the most up-to-date list of the location of the missiles, a current listing from Conventional Ammunition Integrated Management System should be obtained.

L. GOVERNMENT FURNISHED EQUIPMENT AND CONTRACTOR FURNISHED EQUIPMENT TRAINING REQUIREMENTS. NA

M. RELATED NTSPs AND OTHER APPLICABLE DOCUMENTS

DOCUMENT

OR NTSP TITLE

DOCUMENT

OR NTSP NUMBER

PDA

CODE

STATUS

EA-6B ICAP II NTSP

A-50-7904C

PMA234

Approved Dec 96

F/A-18 Weapon System NTSP

A-50-7703G

PMA265

Approved Nov 97

OLSP Change 11

MS-068

AIR-418

Approved Jul 94

ILSP

MS-053

PMA242

Approved Oct 98

HARM Tactical Manual

TM-7912

PMA242

Approved Jun 96



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