Military

[ Navy Training System Plans ]




 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NAVY TRAINING SYSTEM PLAN

FOR THE

ADVANCED COMPOSITE

MATERIAL REPAIR PROGRAM

N88-NTSP-A-50-8404D/P

DECEMBER 2000

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

Advanced composite materials are used extensively in Navy and Marine Corps aircraft and will continue to be used increasingly in future aircraft. The objective of this program is to develop a training progression for Navy and Marine Corps Aircraft Structural Mechanics that leads to proficient intermediate level repair of advanced composite materials. Advanced Composite Material Repair (ACMR) at the organizational level is limited to temporary repair until intermediate level maintenance support is available. This document will only address ACMR intermediate level maintenance, manpower, and training. For organizational level ACMR refer to the appropriate aircraft NTSP. Initial Operating Capability was reached in August 1988. This program is in the final acquisition phase, Production, Deployment, and Operational Support (Phase III).

Advanced composite materials have replaced some metallic materials in many aircraft structures. The technology for advanced composite materials is still evolving even though these materials have been in use for several years. New information and techniques are continually added to the current level of knowledge and skills. Advanced composite materials are used in the AH-1W, AV-8B, CH-53E, HH-60H, F/A-18A/B/C/D/E/F, CH-46D, CH-46E, MH-53E, SH-60B, SH-60F, VH-60, and V-22 aircraft.

Advanced composite materials are repaired by Navy Aviation Structural Mechanic (Structures) (AMS) with Navy Enlisted Classification (NEC) 7232, and Marine Corps Airframe Mechanic personnel. In FY94, the Marine Corps established Military Occupational Specialty (MOS) 6092 specifically for aircraft structural intermediate level maintenance.

The AMS A1 school curriculum provides all prospective Aircraft Structural Mechanics with theory of advanced composites. Additionally, the specific ACMR course, C-603-3868, is available in the Airframes Intermediate Maintenance training track, D/E-603-4007. This ACMR intermediate maintenance training course is taught at Maintenance Training Unit (MTU) 1038 Naval Air Maintenance Training Unit (NAMTRAU) Lemoore, California, and MTU 1039 NAMTRAU Oceana, Virginia.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Page

Executive Summary i

List of Acronyms iii

Preface v

PART I - TECHNICAL PROGRAM DATA

A. Nomenclature-Title-Program I-1

B. Security Classification I-1

C. Manpower, Personnel, and Training Principals I-1

D. System Description I-2

E. Developmental Test and Operational Test I-2

F. Aircraft and/or Equipment/System/Subsystem Replaced I-2

G. Description of New Development I-2

H. Concepts I-4

I. Onboard (In-Service) Training I-10

J. Logistics Support I-11

K. Schedules I-12

L. Government Furnished Equipment and Contractor Furnished Equipment

Training Requirements I-12

M. Related NTSPs and Other Applicable Documents I-12

PART II - BILLET AND PERSONNEL REQUIREMENTS II-1

PART III - TRAINING REQUIREMENTS III-1

PART IV - TRAINING LOGISTICS SUPPORT REQUIREMENTS IV-1

PART V - MPT MILESTONES V-1

PART VI - DECISION ITEMS/ACTION REQUIRED VI-1

PART VII - POINTS OF CONTACT VII-1

LIST OF ACRONYMS

AIMD

Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance Department

ACMR

Advanced Composite Material Repair

AM

Aviation Structural Mechanic

AMH

Aviation Structural Mechanic (Hydraulic)

AMS

Aviation Structural Mechanic (Structures)

AMTCS

Aviation Maintenance Training Continuum System

   

CINCLANTFLT

Commander in Chief, Atlantic Fleet

CINCPACFLT

Commander in Chief, Pacific Fleet

CBT

Computer-Based Training

CFA

Cognizant Field Activity

CNO

Chief of Naval Operations

   

DED

Damage Evaluation Disposition

   

IMA

Intermediate Maintenance Activity

   

MALS

Marine Aviation Logistics Squadron

MATMEP

Maintenance Training Management and Evaluation Program

MOS

Military Occupational Specialty

MTIP

Maintenance Training Improvement Program

MTU

Maintenance Training Unit

   

NA

Not Applicable

NAVMAC

Navy Manpower Analysis Center

NAMTRAU

Naval Air Maintenance Training Unit

NAS

Naval Air Station

NAVAIRSYSCOM

Naval Air Systems Command

NAVPERSOM

Navy Personnel Command

NDI

Non-Destructive Inspection

NEC

Navy Enlisted Classification

NTP

Navy Training Plan

NTSP

Navy Training System Plan

   

OPO

OPNAV Principal Official

   

RFT

Ready For Training

   

SECNAV

Secretary of the Navy

SRM

Structural Repair Manual

   

TD

Training Device

TTE

Technical Training Equipment

 

PREFACE

This Proposed Navy Training System Plan (NTSP) for the Advanced Composite Material Repair (ACMR) Program has been prepared to update the Draft Navy Training System Plan, A-50-8404D/D, dated March 2000. This update complies with guidelines set forth in the Navy Training Requirements Documentation Manual, OPNAV Publication P-751-1-9-97. It incorporates the latest ACMR program manpower data supplied by the Naval Manpower Analysis Center and clarifies Onboard (In-Service) Training by adding qualifying information.

N88-NTSP-A-50-8404D/P

December 2000

PART I - TECHNICAL PROGRAM DATA

A. NOMENCLATURE-TITLE-PROGRAM

1. Nomenclature-Title-Acronym. Advanced Composite Material Repair (ACMR) Program

2. Program Element. Not Applicable (NA)

B. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION

1. System Characteristics Unclassified

2. Capabilities Unclassified

3. Functions Unclassified

C. MANPOWER, PERSONNEL, AND TRAINING PRINCIPALS

OPNAV Principal Official (OPO) Program Sponsor CNO (N781B)

OPO Resource Sponsor CNO (N781)

Marine Corps Program Sponsor CMC (ASL-33)

Developing Agency NAVAIRSYSCOM (PMA205)

Training Agency CINCLANTFLT

CINCPACFLT

CNET

Training Support Agency NAVAIRSYSCOM (PMA205)

Manpower and Personnel Mission Sponsor CNO (N12)

NAVPERSCOM (PERS-4, PERS-404)

Director of Naval Training CNO (N7)

Marine Corps Force Structure MCCDC (C53)

D. SYSTEM DESCRIPTION

1. Operational Uses. The purpose of the ACMR program is to provide trained Navy and Marine Corps aircraft structural mechanics in the repair of advanced composite materials at the intermediate level of maintenance in Work Center 51F. This program focuses on the advanced composite materials used in the AH-1W, AV-8B, CH-53E, HH-60H, F/A-18A/B/C/D/E/F, CH-46D, CH-46E, MH-53E, SH-60B, SH-60F, VH-60, and V-22 aircraft.

2. Foreign Military Sales. NA

E. DEVELOPMENTAL TEST AND OPERATIONAL TEST. Since this is a maintenance procedure and not an aircraft or aircraft component, and the materials used in the repair operation are commercial-off-the-shelf, these tests were not required.

F. AIRCRAFT AND/OR EQUIPMENT/SYSTEM/SUBSYSTEM REPLACED. NA

G. DESCRIPTION OF NEW DEVELOPMENT

1. Functional Description. Advanced composite materials consist of a combination of high-strength, stiff fibers embedded in a common binding material (e.g., carbon fibers and epoxy resin). Composite structures are made of a number of different fiber and resin combinations. Plies of composite materials can be laminated in numbers from two to greater than 50, and may be bonded to a substructure such as aluminum, metallic or non-metallic honeycomb, or a monolithic structure. Composites provide a high strength-to-weight ratio and offer design flexibility.

The use of composites like fiberglass is not new. However, the term "advanced composites" applies to carbon, boron, and kevlar, which have fibers of superior strength and stiffness. These advanced composite materials are now used in Navy and Marine Corps aircraft. Aircraft listed below contain some specific applications of advanced composite materials.

AIRCRAFT

ADVANCED COMPOSITE APPLICATION

AV-8B

Carbon-Epoxy - Wings, Horizontal Stabilizers, Over-wing Fairing, Forward Fuselage, and Control Surfaces

Carbon-Bismaleimide - Lower Flap Skin and Strakes

F/A-18A/B/C/D/E/F

Carbon-Epoxy - Wings, Horizontal and Vertical Stabilizers, and Access Doors

CH-46D, CH-46E

Carbon-Epoxy - Stub Wings, Rotor Blade Spar

CH/MH-53E

Kevlar-Epoxy - Upper and Lower Cockpit, Main and Tail Pylons, Sponson (MH-53E)

Carbon-Epoxy - Sponson (MH-53E)

Boron-Epoxy - Tail Rotor Blade

HH-60H, SH-60B/F, VH-60

Kevlar-Epoxy - Main and Tail Rotor Pylons, Fairings, Doors, Access Panel and Covers

Carbon-Epoxy - Tail Rotor Blade, Floor Panel

AH-1W

Carbon-Epoxy - Engine Cowling, Tailpipe Fairing, Forward Fuselage - Interior and Exterior Panels and Bulkheads

V-22

Carbon-Epoxy - Wing, Fuselage, Empennage, Nacelle, Rotor Blades, Access Doors and Panels

Carbon-Bismaleimide - Nacelle

2. Physical Description. NA

3. New Development Introduction. The ACMR Program was introduced through the establishment of training to address the needs of the Navy and Marine Corps. This program continues to evolve as ACMR requirements are redefined, new techniques are developed, and training is updated to meet these needs.

4. Significant Interfaces. Currently, uncured epoxy-based materials have a very limited shelf-life at room temperature; therefore, they must be freezer-stored. Storage facilities must be provided at all training facilities, activities, and ships that have custody of composite peculiar aircraft and components. All epoxy-based materials will be stored per Federal Regulations Code 29, CFR 1910.6 NFPA 30.

Advanced composite materials are susceptible to hidden impact damage. In some cases, the extent of damage is visually impossible to determine. Non-Destructive Inspection (NDI) is required to analyze the extent of damage and the effectiveness of repairs. NDI technicians, Navy Enlisted Classification (NEC) 7225 and Military Occupational Specialty (MOS) 6033 receive training for NDI of composite materials in C-603-3191, NDI Technician Course. For further information on NDI, refer to the NDI NTSP as listed in paragraph M.

5. New Features, Configurations, or Material. Efforts are underway both commercially and through the Naval Air Warfare Center Aircraft Division in research to extend the shelf-life of current materials and in the use of alternate materials with a longer shelf-life at room temperature.

The Navy is currently utilizing an ACMR method developed by Lockheed Martin Corporation. This repair method, called Vacuum-Mold Repair System, has the capability to produce highly contoured structural repairs in any environment. It employs a reusable quick tooling mold to replicate the contour of a damaged aircraft for the purpose of processing a composite patch. The tooling mold consists of a sealed rubber bag containing lightweight filler to make a mold. The bag is placed against an equivalent undamaged aircraft structure and vacuum is drawn in the bag causing the rubber skin to constrict on the filler, effectively locking the filler into a firm arrangement, and capturing the shape of the undamaged aircraft. A composite patch is then made using the tooling mold. The procedure also uses a pneumatic power feed drill that vacuums all materials and stores them in an environmentally safe bag. This repair method reduces aircraft structural repair time and potential environmental hazards by approximately 60%. The adhesives used in the Vacuum-Mold Repair System, unlike most epoxy, do not require cold storage.

H. CONCEPTS

1. Operational Concept. NA

2. Maintenance Concept

a. Organizational. Organizational level maintenance is performed in Work Center 120 by Navy Aviation Structural Mechanics (Structures) (AMS) and Marine Corps Aircraft Airframe Mechanics.

(1) Preventive Maintenance. Preventive Maintenance at the organizational level is limited to corrosion inspections, treatment, and protection procedures.

(2) Corrective Maintenance. Corrective Maintenance consists of classifying the damaged area and determining if the size and location of the damage is within the authorized repair limits and what type of repair is required. Repairs authorized at this level are extremely limited and include bonded repairs to scratches, dents, gouges, and simple bolt-on repairs. If the damage exceeds authorized limitations the intermediate level maintenance activity will make the necessary repairs.

b. Intermediate. Intermediate level ACMR is performed in Work Center 51F by Navy AMS (NEC 7232) personnel, and Marine Corps Aircraft Structures Mechanics (MOS 6092). Navy and Marine Corps personnel assigned to the NDI Work Center 530 assist both organizational and intermediate maintenance activities in analyzing the extent of damage and effectiveness of repairs using the Damage Evaluation Disposition (DED) program criteria.

Intermediate level maintenance consists of classifying the damaged area and determining if the damage is within the authorized limits. Most bonded structural repairs, repairs requiring special support equipment, and complex bolt-on repairs are accomplished at this level.

The DED program currently employed by the F/A-18 community enables fleet personnel to evaluate damage and request repair procedures not listed in the F/A-18A/B/C/D Structural Repair Manual (SRM). The engineers at the appropriate depot design a customized repair procedure for the damaged area. If the damage exceeds the repair limitations of the intermediate level, the depot level will make the repairs. The procedures outlined in the DED program have been recommended for application to other aircraft.

c. Depot. The depot assigned as Cognizant Field Activity (CFA) for each aircraft type that uses composite materials has developed composite materials repair procedures in cooperation with the aircraft manufacturers. Depot level maintenance consists of repairing aircraft structures and components that are beyond the capability of the Intermediate Maintenance Activity (IMA). These repairs are accomplished using the aircraft SRM or depot and prime manufacturer developed repair procedures.

d. Interim Maintenance. NA

e. Life Cycle Maintenance Plan. NA

3. Manning Concept. Intermediate level maintenance is performed by Navy AMS personnel with NEC 7232 and Marine Corps Aircraft Structures Mechanics with MOS 6092. NDI is performed by Navy AMS personnel with NEC 7225 and Marine Corps personnel with MOS 6033. The manning concept for NDI technicians is contained in the NDI NTSP as listed in part M.

Note: The Secretary of the Navy (SECNAV) has approved the merger of the AMS and Navy Aviation Structural Mechanic (Hydraulics) (AMH) ratings to the AM rating. The target final implementation date has been set for March 1, 2001. The Aviation Structural Mechanic (Structures and Hydraulics) course curriculum will not be affected by the rating merger. Specialized intermediate level NEC producing "C" schools will still be continuously utilized as required by specific billets.

Current manpower for Aircraft Structural Mechanics at squadrons, Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance Departments (AIMDs), and Marine Aviation Logistics Squadrons (MALSs) are sufficient to support the maintenance requirements for advanced composite materials.

Not all trained AMS personnel with NEC 7232 and Marine Corps Aircraft Structures Mechanics with MOS 6092 support the ACMR program. The following Navy Manpower table for the ACMR program was provided by Navy Manpower Analysis Center (NAVMAC) and reflects current manpower requirements for the Navy ACMR program. This information was derived from Work Unit Code workload information associated with composite components on the aircraft listed in this document and Naval Aviation Logistics Data Analysis. United States Marine Corps manpower data for the ACMR program was derived from Table of Manpower Requirements, Total Force Structure, Marine Corps Combat Development Center.

ACTIVITY, UIC

BILLETS

RATE

NEC

NOTE

HCS 4, 53811

1 TAR

AMS2

7232

 

HM 14, 53827

1 ACDU

1 TAR

AMS2

AMS2

7232

7232

 

HS 75, 09031

0

   

1

VAQ 209, 53870

0

   

1

VAW 78, 09102

0

   

1

VC 6, 09806

0

   

1

VC 6 Detachment, Patuxent River, 55243

0

   

1

VP 62, 09163

0

   

1

VP 64, 09172

0

   

1

VP 66, 09174

0

   

1

VP 92, 09146

0

   

1

VP 94, 09148

0

   

1

VR 53, 55617

0

   

1

VR 54, 52895

0

   

1

VR 62, 09324

0

   

1

HCS 5, 53812

1 TAR

AMS2

7232

 

HM 15, 55201

1 ACDU

1 TAR

AMS2

AMS2

7232

7232

 

HC 85, 09061

0

   

1

VAQ 129, 09995

0

   

1

VP 65, 09173

0

   

1

VP 69, 09989

0

   

1

VR 55, 53855

0

   

1

MCAS Beaufort SEAOPDET, 46961

1

AMS2

7232

 

NAS Jacksonville SEAOPDET, 46965

0

   

2

NAS Oceana SEAOPDET, 46963

4

9

AMS2

AMS3

7232

7232

 

Norfolk SEAOPDET, 46966

0

   

1

USS Bataan (LHD 5), 21879

0

   

3

USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69), 03369

1 ACDU

AMS1

7232

 

USS Enterprise (CVN 65), 03365

1 ACDU

AMS1

7232

 

USS George Washington (CVN 73), 21412

1 ACDU

AMS1

7232

 

USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75), 21853

1 ACDU

AMS1

7232

 

USS Iwo Jima (LHD 7), 23027

0

   

3

USS John F. Kennedy (CV 67), 03367

1 ACDU

AMS1

7232

 

USS Kearsarge (LHD 3), 21700

0

   

3

USS Nassau (LHA 4), 20725

0

   

3

USS Saipan (LHA 2), 20632

0

   

3

USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71), 21247

1 ACDU

AMS1

7232

 

USS Wasp (LHD-1), 21560

0

   

3

NAS Lemoore SEAOPDET, 46964

4

AMS2

7232

 

NAS North Island SEAOPDET, 46968

0

   

2

NAS Point Mugu SEAOPDET, 46962

0

   

1

NAS Whidbey Island SEAOPDET, 46967

0

   

1

USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72), 21297

1 ACDU

AMS1

7232

 

USS Belleau Wood (LHA 3), 20633

0

   

3

USS Bonhomme Richard (LHD 6), 22202

0

   

3

USS Boxer (LHD 4), 21808

0

   

3

USS Carl Vinson (CVN 70), 20993

1 ACDU

AMS1

7232

 

USS Constellation (CV 64), 03364

1 ACDU

1 ACDU

AMS1

AMSAN

7232

7232

4

5

USS Essex (LHD 2), 21533

0

   

3

USS Inchon (MCS 12), 20009

0

   

3

USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74), 21847

1 ACDU

AMS1

7232

 

USS Kitty Hawk (CV 63), 03363

1 ACDU

AMS1

7232

 

USS Nimitz (CVN 68), 03368

0

   

6

USS Peleliu (LHA 5), 20748

0

   

3

USS Ronald Reagan (CVN 76), 22178

1 ACDU

AMS1

7232

7

USS Tarawa (LHA 1), 20550

1 ACDU

0

 

3

Notes:

  1. This activity does not support any of the aircraft listed on pages I-2, paragraph D.1.
  2. The intermediate level composite workload is not sufficient to support an ACMR billet.
  3. The embarked squadrons provide Composite Technicians to the intermediate level.
  4. This billet is scheduled to be deleted in October 2002.
  5. This billet was deleted in July 2000.
  6. There are no ACMR designated billets currently assigned. One AMS1 7232 requirement will be added during the next AIMD Activity Manpower Document review.
  7. This billet will be activated in FY02.

4. Training Concept. Training on advanced composite materials begins at the "A" school level. The AMS A1 school curriculum provides all prospective structural mechanics with theory on advanced composites. The two applicable courses are:

    • C-603-0175, Aviation Structural Mechanic (Structures and Hydraulics) Class A1
    • C-603-0176, Aviation Structural Mechanic (Structures and Hydraulics) Organizational Level Strand Class A1

The Advanced Composite Materials Maintenance course, C-603-3868, encompasses the required training for the repair of all composite materials in use on Navy and Marine Corps aircraft. Many of the repair techniques, including the tools and support equipment used in ACMR, are being used in the repair of other composite materials such as fiberglass epoxy. This includes cored structures, rotor blades, and radomes (as reflected in NAVAIR 01-1A-22, Aircraft Radomes and Antenna Covers). This training covers the skills required for these structures.

This course (C-603-3868) has been modified to incorporate strain gage installation, rotor blade and radome repair, expanded advanced composites repair, and personnel safety. This training is provided in an Environmental Protection Agency and Occupational Health and Safety Administration approved environment that demonstrates those requirements to the student. In addition, all Material Safety Data Sheets required are an integral part of the training. This course is limited to intermediate level maintenance technicians. The course is part of training track D/E-603-4007, Airframes Intermediate Maintenance. Training is conducted at two locations, MTU 1038 NAMTRAU Lemoore and MTU 1039 NAMTRAU Oceana.

The established training concept for most aviation maintenance training divides "A" School courses into two or more segments called Core and Strand. Many organizational level "C" School courses are also divided into separate Initial and Career training courses. "A" School Core courses include general knowledge and skills training for the particular rating, while "A" School Strand courses focus on the more specialized training requirements for that rating and a specific aircraft or equipment, based on the student's fleet activity destination. Strand training immediately follows Core training and is part of the "A" School. Upon completion of Core and Strand "A" Schools, graduates going to organizational level activities attend the appropriate Initial "C" School for additional specific training. Initial "C" School training is intended for students in paygrades E-4 and below. Career "C" School training is provided to organizational level personnel, E-5 and above, to enhance skills and knowledge within their field. "A" School graduates going to intermediate level activities attend the appropriate intermediate level "C" School. Intermediate level "C" Schools are not separated into Initial and Career courses.

a. Initial Training. Initial training was completed in May 1987 for personnel from NAMTRAUs and the instructors at the AMS "A" school. No further initial training is required.

b. Follow-on Training

Title ....................

Airframes Intermediate Maintenance

CIN .....................

D/E-603-4007

Model Manager ...

MTU 1038 NAMTRAU Lemoore

Description ..........

This track provides training to Airframes Intermediate Maintenance Technicians. It includes course C-603-3868 and covers:

  • Introduction to Advanced Composite Material Repair
  • Evaluation
  • Repair Criteria
  • Repair Procedures and Processes.

Upon completion, the student will be able to perform as an Airframes Intermediate Maintenance Technician under limited supervision.

Locations..............

  • MTU 1038 NAMTRAU Lemoore
  • MTU 1039 NAMTRAU Oceana

Length .................

30 days

RFT date .............

Currently available

Skill identifier......

  • NEC 7232
  • MOS 6092

TTE/TD ..............

All Training Devices (TDs) are locally manufactured and consist of examples of various damaged structures. See element IV.A.2 of this document.

Prerequisite ........

C-603-0175, Aviation Structural Mechanic (Structures and Hydraulics) Class A1

c. Student Profiles

SKILL

IDENTIFIER

PREREQUISITE

SKILL AND KNOWLEDGE REQUIREMENTS

AMS 7232

  • C-603-0175, Aviation Structural Mechanic (Structures and Hydraulics) Class A1
  • C-603-0176, Aviation Structural Mechanic (Structures and Hydraulics) Organizational Level Strand Class A1

MOS 6092

  • C-603-0175, Aviation Structural Mechanic (Structures and Hydraulics) Class A1
  • C-603-0176, Aviation Structural Mechanic (Structures and Hydraulics) Organizational Level Strand Class A1

d. Training Pipelines. All required training tracks have been established and/or updated.

I. ONBOARD (IN-SERVICE) TRAINING

1. Proficiency or Other Training Organic to the New Development. The training tracks are in place to provide the knowledge needed to accomplish the tasks associated with ACMR. Sharpening of these skills and keeping up to date with the latest advancements can be accomplished in the field with the use of available programs.

a. The Aviation Maintenance Training Continuum System. The Aviation Maintenance Training Continuum System (AMTCS) will provide career path training to the Sailor or Marine from their initial service entry to the end of their military career. AMTCS is planned to be an integrated system that will satisfy the training and administrative requirements of both the individual and the organization. The benefits will be manifested in the increased effectiveness of the technicians and the increased efficiencies of the management of the training business process. By capitalizing on technological advances and integrating systems and processes where appropriate, the right amount of training can be provided at the right time to meet the CNO's mandated "just-in-time" training approach. AMTCS is planned to start fleet implementation in March 2001; however, specific AMTCS implementation for ACMR is currently unfunded.

Technology investments enable the development of several state-of-the-art training and administrative tools: Computer-Based Training (CBT) for the technicians in the Fleet in the form of Interactive Courseware (ICW) with Computer Managed Instruction (CMI) and Computer Aided Instruction (CAI) for the schoolhouse.

Included in the AMTCS development effort is the Aviation Maintenance Training Continuum System - Software Module (ASM) which provides testing [Test and Evaluation (TEV)], recording [Electronic Training Jacket (ETJ)], and a Feedback system. The core functionality of these AMTCS tools are based and designed around the actual maintenance-related tasks the technicians perform, and the tasks are stored and maintained in a Master Task List (MTL) data bank. These tools are procured and fielded with appropriate COTS hardware and software, i.e., Fleet Training Devices (FTD) - Laptops, PCs, Electronic Classrooms (ECR), Learning Resource Centers (LRC), operating software, and network software and hardware

Upon receipt of direction from OPNAV (N789H), AMTCS is to be implemented and the new tools integrated into the daily training environment of all participating aviation activities and supporting elements. AMTCS will serve as the standard training system for aviation maintenance training within the Navy and Marine Corps, and is planned to supersede the existing Maintenance Training Improvement Program (MTIP) and Maintenance Training Management and Evaluation Program (MATMEP) programs. AMTCS implementation will begin with the F-14, E-2C, and all models F/A-18 aircraft. For more information on AMTCS refer to PMA205-3D3.

AMTCS for ACMR is currently unfunded, but the intent is to support the ACMR program in the future through Interactive Multimedia Instruction (IMI), etc. Funding is not imminent at this time to warrant detailed plans and these details are not germane to the NTSP at this time. PMA205 procures training and training modifications based on funded and approved training requirements established by OPNAV N789. As such, this NTSP documents the current status of the training. Upon approval and funding of the new training requirement, PMA205 will update the NTSP via AIR 3.4.1. The paragraphs above reference support that will be provided for ACMR through the AMTCS including Fleet Training Devices (FTD) - Laptops, PCs, Electronic Classrooms (ECR), Learning Resource Centers (LRC), operating software, and network software and hardware. The NTSP does not provide details on the burden that ACMR will place on these training resources because the details of the burden are undetermined at the current time. AMTCS support is not critical to ACMR, thereby explaining the current unprioritized nature of AMTCS applicability to ACMR. The details of the Training Services, Courseware Requirements, Curricula Materials, and Training Aids are undetermined at the current time, and, therefore, are not included in Part IV.

2. Personnel Qualification Standards. NA

3. Other Onboard or In-service Training Packages. Marine Corps onboard training is based on the current series of MCO P4790.12, Individual Training Standards System and MATMEP. This program is designed to meet Marine Corps, as well as Navy OPNAVINST 4790.2 series, maintenance training requirements. It is a performance-based, standardized, level-progressive, documentable, training management and evaluation program. It identifies and prioritizes task inventories by MOS through a front-end analysis process that identifies task, skill, and knowledge requirements of each MOS. (MATMEP is planned to be replaced by AMTCS).

J. LOGISTICS SUPPORT

1. Manufacturer and Contract Numbers. NA

2. Program Documentation. NA

3. Technical Data Plan. An Advanced Composite Material General Repair Manual, NAVAIR 01-1A-21, has been developed to support and assist the Aircraft Structural Mechanic's general knowledge and familiarity with terminology, construction characteristics, and the special handling and repair techniques associated with advanced composite materials. This manual includes information on identification of composite materials and their uses, general safety and handling of composite materials, work facilities, tools and equipment, glossary of terms, basic techniques for bonded and bolt-on repairs, composite fasteners, curing of materials, and general NDI requirements.

Continuous updates to Navy and Marine Corps aircraft structural repair manuals and training manuals are needed due to the ever-changing technology of advanced composite materials. The CFAs are responsible for informing the appropriate squadrons, AIMDs, MALSs, and MTUs of any revisions to applicable SRMs and training manuals. This procedure provides the most up-to-date information to these activities.

4. Test Sets, Tools, and Test Equipment. Common hand tools are used in the repair of composite structures wherever possible. However, organizational and intermediate level maintenance personnel require several peculiar items including safety equipment and consumable materials.

The Temperature-Vacuum Control Repair Set, 1935AS100-1A, is a generic composite repair console used to support organizational and intermediate level ACMR. The Aircraft Structural Mechanic uses the Temperature-Vacuum Control Repair Set to create a vacuum in the repaired area, then heat the area to a specified temperature and time to cure the advanced composite materials.

In addition, a locally assembled Composite Repair Tool Kit is available that standardizes the tools and equipment used by the IMAs that support and maintain composite materials. A list of equipment and tools that are included in this kit is contained in element IV.A.1 of this NTSP. This kit is also used at training activities to facilitate ACMR training. The Composite Repair Tool Kit is included in the Tool Control Master Listing and its components are available through normal supply channels. The tools contained in this kit are also available individually to meet the specific needs of an organizational activity if they do not require an entire tool kit.

Equipment for NDI of composites includes the Composite Bond Tester and the Composite Laminate Tester. In addition, ultrasonic equipment using "C" scan that covers a large area is currently in use at depot level. For further information on these devices refer to the NDI NTSP as listed in paragraph M.

5. Repair Parts. NA

6. Human Systems Integration. NA

K. SCHEDULES

1. Schedule of Events. All courses and materials are in place and there is no requirement at this time for further deployment.

a. Installation and Delivery Schedules. NA

b. Ready For Operational Use Schedule. All activities have been ACMR capable since the Initial Operating Capability of August 1988.

c. Time Required to Install at Operational Sites. NA

d. Foreign Military Sales and Other Source Delivery Schedule. NA

e. Training Device and Delivery Schedule. All Training Devices are in place.

L. GOVERNMENT FURNISHED EQUIPMENT AND CONTRACTOR FURNISHED EQUIPMENT TRAINING REQUIREMENTS. NA

M. RELATED NTSPs AND OTHER APPLICABLE DOCUMENTS

DOCUMENT

OR NTSP TITLE

DOCUMENT

OR NTSP NUMBER

PDA

CODE

STATUS

AH-1W Aircraft NTP

A-50-8520D/A

PMA261

Approved

Mar 96

T/AV-8B Harrier II Plus Weapon System NTSP

A-50-8210D/D

PMA257

Draft

Aug 99

CH-53D AND CH-53E Helicopter NTSP

A-50-7604G/D

PMA261

Proposed

Oct 00

MH-53E Helicopter NTSP

A-50-8417D/D

PMA261

Proposed

Oct 00

HH-60H Combat Search and Rescue Special Warfare Support Helicopter NTP

A-50-8714B/A

PMA299

Approved

Dec 93

H-46 Helicopter NTSP

A-50-9409B/D

PMA261

Draft

Oct 99

SH-60F Carrier Inner-zone Antisubmarine Warfare Helicopter NTSP

A-50-8508D/D

PMA299

Approved

Aug 00

USMC KC-130J Advanced Tanker NTSP

NA

PMA200

Initial

Oct 98

F/A-18 Weapon System NTSP

A-50-7703H/D

PMA265

Draft

Nov 00

V-22 Osprey Joint Training System Plan

A-50-8412D/A

PMA275

Approved

Aug 99

Non-Destructive Inspection NTSP

A-50-8518B/D

AIR 522

Approved

May 00



NEWSLETTER
Join the GlobalSecurity.org mailing list