Military



APPENDIX F

ROUTE CLEARANCE


The purpose of this appendix is to assist field units in route-clearance operations. The TTP that follow establish basic guidelines for conducting this combined-arms combat operation. They are not all encompassing and may be modified to meet the needs of the user.

OVERVIEW

To clear a route, the battalion focuses one company/team as the main effort on the route proposed as the MSR, and the remainder of the battalion conducts clearance-in-zone operations on terrain that dominates the MSR. The brigade retains an air-assault or a mechanized company in reserve. During route-clearance operations, the TF could perform the following missions:

FACTS AND ASSUMPTIONS

In a route-clearance operation, the following facts and assumptions apply:

TASK-FORCE TASKS TO BE ACCOMPLISHED

You must accomplish the following tasks for route-clearance operations:

RECOMMENDED TASK ORGANIZATION

Table F-1 shows an example of the company/team organization for route-clearance operations. See Figure F-1 for an example of a graphic illustration of a route-clearance operation.

Table F-1. Sample task organization for route-clearance operations


HEAVY TEAM

LIGHT TEAM

OPERATIONAL PLANNING CONSIDERATIONS

The following items should be considered by the TF when planning route-clearance operations:

INTELLIGENCE

The supporting staff conducts IPB to identify choke points, bridges, tunnels, critical road junctions, and other built-up areas. However, depending on its overall mission, the enemy may not always emplace obstacles at these locations. This is especially true if its goal is to psychologically disrupt our convoys. The following are factors that should be included in the IPB:

MANEUVER

The battle drill for the company/team, when encountering a known or suspected minefield, is as follows:

For a heavy team-

For a light team, route-clearance operations are the same as those conducted by the heavy force with the following exceptions:

FIRE SUPPORT

The following should be considered when planning for fire support:

MOBILITY/SURVIVABILITY

The following should be considered when planning for M/S:

AIR-DEFENSE ARTILLERY

Despite air supremacy, the possibility of an air attack should be considered. Use the following passive air-defense measures:

COMBAT SERVICE SUPPORT

The following should be considered when planning for CSS:

COMMAND AND CONTROL

The following should be considered when planning for C2:

Table F-2. Minefield indicators


When conducting deliberate-sweep (mine detectro and visual observation) or hasty-sweep operations, the presence of the following indicators may warn individuals of buried mines or hidden booby traps:

SPECIAL OPERATIONS

The following should be considered when planning for special operations:

REFERENCES

The manuals listed in Table F-3, provide additional information on route-clearance operations.

Table F-3. References for route-clearance operations


FM 5-114. Engineer Operations short of War. 13 July 1992

FM 19-1. Military Police Support for the AirLand Battle. 23 May 1988.

FM 19-4. Military Police Battlefield Circulation Control, Area Security, and Enemy Prisoner of War Operations. 7 May 1993.

FM 20-32. Mine/Countermine Operations. 30 September 1992.

FM 33-1. Psychological Operations. 18 February 1993.

FM 34-130. Intelligence Preparation of the Battlefield. 8 July 1994.

FM 41-10. Civil Affairs Operations. 11 January 1993.

FM 63-6. Combat Service Support in Low-Intensity Conflict. 21 January 1992.

FM 90-13-1. Combined Arms Breaching Operations. 28 February 1991 (Change 1, May 1993).

Mine Recognition and Warfare Handbook. November 1990.





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