Military

Chapter 3

Civil Affairs Functions, Capabilities, and Organization

On 17 August 1955, the CA Military Government Branch became the USAR Branch; on 2 October 1959, it became the CA Branch. The major organizational development of the branch traces back to the expansion of the War Department during WWII. At that time, the War and Navy Departments relied primarily upon volunteers from specific civilian careers for consolidation, occupation, and posthostility operations. In exchange for their services, the volunteers received commissions and appropriate military, area, and language training. Today, civilian expertise remains an overriding requirement in choosing personnel for CA assignments. The Army seeks to capitalize on the unique capabilities of citizen-soldiers who offer high levels of civilian experience and military education appropriate to their grades. The experiences, coupled with military operational and planning expertise, result in soldiers who can support contingencies across the range of military operations. CA personnel support commanders in a broad spectrum of missions, from liaison to the assumption of executive, legislative, and judicial processes in occupied areas or nations emerging from conflict.

CIVIL AFFAIRS FUNCTIONS AND CAPABILITIES

3-1. The primary function of all Army CA units is to support CMO. To accomplish this broad mission, Army CA units are organized to support allied forces, the Services, U.S. Government agencies, agencies of other countries, and various IOs. Mission guidance and priorities--including prioritized regional engagement activities and language requirements--from respective unified command CINCs provide regional focus.

AREA EXPERTISE

3-2. Area expertise is a distinguishing characteristic of CA forces. Through continuing education, country studies, and numerous operational and training deployments, CA personnel maintain individual and unit readiness to conduct CA operations in their assigned region. This regional focus, coupled with specific cultural awareness, ensures relevant CA support to theater OPLANs, CONPLANs, functional plans, and CINC initiatives.

CA GENERALISTS

3-3. Most active duty CA staff personnel and personnel assigned to tactical units are CA generalists. When employed, CA generalists support the commander's immediate needs by planning and coordinating CA activities that support the mission. The ability to negotiate with local civilians and a thorough knowledge of the military decision-making process are critical skills of the CA generalist. Effective CMO begin with the CA generalist's estimate of the situation and continue through COA development and mission execution. Area assessments or surveys assist CA functional specialists in completing detailed planning for CMO to be conducted by other forces.

CA FUNCTIONAL SPECIALISTS

3-4. RC CA units are organized to provide expertise in 16 functional skills. Although the AC has the capability to execute missions in some of these functional specialty areas, it cannot maintain the high-level skills required for specialized CA activities. CA activities requiring specific civilian skills are, therefore, maintained in the RC. Within each specialty, technically qualified and experienced individuals advise and assist the commander and can assist or direct their civilian counterparts.

3-5. CA functional specialists are generalists with additional areas of expertise, normally acquired through civilian education, training, and experience. They have knowledge of CSS operations and are familiar with the organization and SOP of supported units. CA functional specialists are normally in Civil Affairs Commands (CACOMs), CA brigades, and RC CA battalions. They--

  • Are knowledgeable of FN political issues that have an impact on national-level planning.
  • Are area-oriented and able to participate in joint deliberate and crisis-action planning.
  • Have a thorough understanding of national policies and procedures.
  • Possess technical skills as required to operate within the area employed.

LANGUAGE

3-6. A theater-oriented language capability enhances the effectiveness of CA personnel. CA organizations attempt to achieve limited basic language skills aligned with their theater CINC's priority language list. Ideally, CA units recruit individuals with a combination of civilian technical expertise, military education appropriate to their grade, and language skills appropriate to their theater of employment. In practice, however, language skills are very difficult to attain and maintain and thus must be supplemented by interpreters and translators contracted locally.

CIVIL AFFAIRS ORGANIZATION

3-7. CA units support SOF and conventional forces at the tactical, operational, and strategic levels. Most of the Army CA force is in the USAR. This force consists of four regionally aligned CACOMs that support one of four unified combatant commands (USPACOM, USEUCOM, USCENTCOM, and USSOUTHCOM). The CACOMs provide CA support to the respective CINCs, as necessary, by attaching task-organized elements from their headquarters (HQ) or attached CA brigades and battalions.

3-8. To meet the increased need for a rapid deployment CA capability, the Army established an AC, airborne-qualified, CA battalion with a worldwide mission. Composed of five companies, each aligned with a geographic combatant command; the battalion is capable of rapidly deploying CA forces anywhere in the world. This capability meets initial CA force requirements during contingency operations. Subsequent transition to RC CA forces begins as soon as the forces can be mobilized and deployed to the AO. Because AC and RC CA units are regionally oriented, they have expertise in the cultural and political aspects of countries within a region.

3-9. To meet the stated requirements of the CA unit's supported HQ and the total needs of the Army, the living table of organization and equipment (LTOE) structure is in effect. This structure enables CA commanders to resource specific CA mission requirements with functional specialty capabilities in their commands. CA elements are thus tailored, prior to employment, with consideration to the mission, enemy, terrain, troops, time available, and civil (METT-TC). Figure 3-1 shows the various levels of command supported by CA units.

Figure 3-1. Typical Levels of CA Support

CIVIL AFFAIRS COMMAND

3-10. The Army inventory has four CACOMs, all in the USAR. Each CACOM (Figure 3-2) aligns with one of four geographic combatant commands--PACOM, CENTCOM, EUCOM, or SOUTHCOM. The CACOMs are flexible, multipurpose organizations for training, equipping, mobilizing, and deploying task-organized teams, in support of CMO, for the geographic CINC. They accomplish this mission by providing CMO staff augmentation to component and joint theater staffs, as required.

Figure 3-2. Typical CACOM Structure

CAPABILITIES

3-11. Capabilities of the CACOM are to--

  • Train, equip, mobilize, and deploy assigned or attached CA forces.
  • Provide predeployment C2 of assigned and attached CA brigades and battalions.
  • Establish procedures and processes for cataloging available indigenous resources, facilities, and FNS.
  • Establish procedures and processes for minimizing civilian interference with military operations.
  • Provide information to the intelligence system.
  • Provide information on cultural considerations.
  • Assist in formulating the theater policy for civil assistance, civic action, and civil administration activities and missions.
  • Provide a Civil Affairs plans, programs, and policy team (CAP3T) as needed.
  • Provide a Civil Affairs Planning Team Alpha (CAPT-A) and a Civil Affairs Planning Team Bravo (CAPT-B) to support CMO staffs at unified, subunified, and theater component commands.
  • Provide technical expertise in 16 CA functional specialties to plan, coordinate, assess, or conduct CA activities based on mission requirements.
  • Provide liaison with government organizations, NGOs, and IOs.
  • Establish a CMOC as required.

ORGANIZATION

3-12. A typical CACOM (Figure 3-2) consists of a headquarters and headquarters company (HHC), one CA battalion (SO), and one or more CA brigades.

HEADQUARTERS AND HEADQUARTERS COMPANY, CACOM

3-13. The HHC, CACOM (Figure 3-3) provides predeployment C2, staff supervision, and mission planning.

Figure 3-3. Typical HHC, CACOM Structure

Capabilities

3-14. The CACOM HHC provides the organization, command authority, and staff capacity to execute the capabilities of the command.

Organization

3-15. A typical HHC, CACOM (Figure 3-3) consists of three major elements: a company HQ, a command HQ, and attached planning teams (CAPT-Bs and CAPT-As). The company HQ provides the necessary personnel to support the HQ with supplies and arranges for equipment maintenance.

COMMAND HEADQUARTERS

3-16. The command HQ consists of an economics and commerce team and a G1, G2, G3, G4, CAP3T, government team, public facilities team, special functions team, communications section, and linguist team. It provides predeployment C2 of assigned and attached elements.

Command Group

3-17. Responsibilities of personnel within the command group include the following:

  • The commander exercises command of the CACOM and all attached or assigned elements. The commander may also act as the geographic combatant CINC's senior CA advisor, if deployed.
  • The deputy commanding officer (DCO) performs the duties assigned by the commander, including directing the day-to-day activities and command of the CACOM in the commander's absence.
  • The command sergeant major (CSM) is the command's senior noncommissioned officer (NCO) and the primary advisor to the commander and staff on matters pertaining to enlisted personnel and the NCO corps. The CSM monitors policy implementation and standards on the performance, training, appearance, and conduct of enlisted personnel. The CSM provides counsel and guidance to NCOs and other enlisted personnel.

Coordinating Staff Group

3-18. Responsibilities of personnel within the coordinating staff group include the following:

  • The G1 is the primary staff officer for all personnel service support (PSS) matters and other administrative matters not specifically assigned to another coordinating staff officer. The specific areas of responsibility are strength management, casualty reporting, and morale support activities.
  • The G2 is the primary staff officer for all aspects of intelligence, counterintelligence, and security support in garrison. The G2 plans, coordinates, approves, and directs all CACOM-level intelligence analysis, production, and dissemination. The G2 identifies the need for intelligence support and intelligence automated data processing (ADP) support and assists in planning and coordinating the support. The G2 is responsible for the CACOM's information security, information systems security, and personnel security. He conducts and coordinates OPSEC and force protection needs.
  • The G3 is the primary staff officer for all matters pertaining to the organization, training, planning, and operations of the CACOM. The G3 has overall staff responsibility for OPSEC, force development, and modernization.
  • The G4 is the primary staff officer for all logistic matters. Specific responsibilities include logistics operations, plans, and transportation. The G4 has staff planning and supervision over procurement, contracting, real property control, food service, and clothing exchange.
  • The communications-electronics (CE) officer is the staff officer responsible for information systems operations and maintenance. The CE officer directly supervises the command communications section to ensure continuous signal support.
  • The command chaplain is the primary advisor to the commander and staff on moral, ethical, and religious issues affecting the unit mission. The chaplain plans and coordinates comprehensive religious support of all assigned and attached personnel and their families.
  • The command SJA is the primary advisor to the commander and his staff on legal matters. The SJA advises on matters concerning military law, U.S. domestic law, international law, operational law, foreign law, SOFAs, and ROE. He reviews all mission taskings, orders, and briefbacks to ensure compliance with legal statutes.

CA SPECIALTY TEAMS, CACOM

3-19. The CACOM provides four task-organized specialty function teams and a linguist team (Figure 3-4) to support commands. The four specialty function teams comprise the technical expertise of all 16 CA functional skills and correspond with those civilian sectors most likely to have an impact on CMO. Each mission may require a different emphasis on skills and team composition. A transition operation, in which the military force is redeploying home while the FN reestablishes civilian services, may place greater importance on economic development and public administration planning, whereas a humanitarian assistance operation may demand DC and emergency service specialties.

Figure 3-4. CACOM Specialty Teams

GOVERNMENT TEAM, CACOM

3-20. The CACOM government team (Figure 3-4) consists of functional specialists in public administration, public education, public safety, international law, and public health. It provides technical expertise, staff advice, and planning assistance to the supported command. The team conducts assessments of government resources and systems and determines how these may impact CMO. Team members coordinate with FN administrators and representatives of other associated organizations to support the commander's objectives. The government team provides recommendations, and when appropriate, direction, to maintain, sustain, and improve FN services.

Capabilities

3-21. Capabilities of each functional specialty within the CACOM government team are as follows:

Public Administration

  • Provide technical expertise, advice, and assistance in identifying and assessing FN public administration systems, agencies, services, personnel, and resources.
  • Determine the capabilities and effectiveness of public administration systems and the impact of those systems on CMO.
  • Develop plans and provide operational oversight and supervision in rehabilitating or establishing public administration systems, agencies, and resources.
  • Coordinate with FN government administrators and agencies in support of CMO.
  • Advise and assist in restoring, establishing, organizing, and operating public government systems and agencies.
  • Advise and assist in developing technical administrative requirements, policies, and procedures for providing government services to the local population.

Public Education

  • Provide technical expertise, advice, and assistance in identifying and assessing FN public, parochial, and private education systems, agencies, services, personnel, and resources.
  • Determine the capabilities and effectiveness of education systems and the impact of those systems on CMO.
  • Develop plans and provide operational oversight and supervision in rehabilitating or establishing public education systems, agencies, facilities, and resources.
  • Advise and assist in establishing the technical requirements for the public education system to support government administration (primary, secondary, and postsecondary educational systems).
  • Advise and assist in rehabilitating, establishing, and maintaining public education systems and agencies.
  • Assist in coordinating FN, IO, NGO, and U.S. assistance and resources to support local government education systems as part of CMO.

Public Safety

  • Provide technical expertise, advice, and assistance in identifying and assessing FN public safety systems, agencies, services, personnel, and resources.
  • Determine the capabilities and effectiveness of public safety systems and the impact of those systems on CMO.
  • Develop plans and provide operational oversight and supervision in rehabilitating or establishing public safety systems, equipment, and facilities.
  • Advise and assist in establishing the technical requirements for government public safety systems to support government administration (police and law enforcement administration, fire protection, emergency rescue, and penal systems).
  • Advise and assist in rehabilitating, establishing, and maintaining government public safety systems and agencies.
  • Assist in employing public safety resources to support government administration, CMO, and military use.
  • Assist in coordinating FN, IO, NGO, and U.S. assistance and resources to support local government public health systems as part of CMO.

International Law

  • Provide technical expertise, advice, and assistance in identifying and assessing FN legal systems, agencies, services, personnel, resources, laws, codes, and statutes.
  • Determine the capabilities and effectiveness of legal systems and the impact of those on CMO.
  • Assist the SJA in educating and training U.S. personnel in the FN legal system, obligations, and consequences.
  • Advise and assist the SJA in international law issues.
  • Coordinate with the SJA to assist and advise local FN judicial agencies.
  • Conduct liaison and monitor the local FN judiciary system to deconflict differences in administration of laws, agreements, and policies.

Public Health

  • Provide technical expertise, advice, and assistance in identifying and assessing FN public and private health systems, sanitation systems, agencies, services, personnel, resources, and facilities.
  • Determine the capabilities and effectiveness of health and sanitation systems and the impact of those systems on CMO.
  • Develop plans and provide operational oversight and supervision in rehabilitating or establishing public health systems, agencies, equipment, and facilities.
  • Coordinate the use of FN government and private health resources for military use, for CMO, and in support of government administration.
  • Advise and assist in establishing the technical requirements for public health services and resources to support government administration (clinics, hospitals, pharmacies, food preparation and storage, ambulance transportation, skilled personnel, and education).
  • Advise and assist in rehabilitating, establishing, delivering, and maintaining government public health systems and agencies.
  • Assist in coordinating FN, IO, NGO, and U.S. assistance and resources to support local government public health systems as part of CMO.
  • Advise and assist FN, IO, NGO, and U.S. agencies in preventing, controlling, and treating diseases (education, immunization, and sanitation).

Organization

3-22. See Figure 3-4 for the composition of the CACOM government team.

PUBLIC FACILITIES TEAM, CACOM

3-23. The CACOM public facilities team (Figure 3-4) consists of functional specialists in public transportation, public works, and public communications. It provides technical expertise, planning assistance, and staff advice to the supported command. The team assesses resources and systems by sector and determines the impact of these on CMO. Team members coordinate with FN administrators and representatives of other associated organizations to support the commander's objectives. The public facilities team provides recommendations and direction in maintaining, sustaining, and improving FN services.

Capabilities

3-24. Capabilities of each functional specialty within the CACOM public facilities team are as follows:

Public Transportation

  • Provide technical expertise, advice, and assistance in identifying and assessing FN public and commercial transportation systems, agencies, services, personnel, and resources.
  • Determine capabilities and effectiveness of transportation systems and the impact of those systems on CMO.
  • Develop plans and provide operational oversight and supervision in rehabilitating or establishing transportation equipment, facilities, and systems.
  • Coordinate the use of government and commercial transportation resources for military use, for CMO, and in support of government administration.
  • Advise and assist in establishing the technical requirements for government and commercial transportation resources to support government administration (motor vehicles and roads, trains and railways, boats and waterways, aircraft and airports, and pipelines).
  • Advise and assist in rehabilitating, establishing, and maintaining government transportation systems and agencies.

Public Works and Utilities

  • Provide technical expertise, advice, and assistance in identifying and assessing FN public and commercial works and utilities systems, agencies, services, and facilities.
  • Determine capabilities and effectiveness of public works and utilities systems and the impact of those systems on CMO.
  • Develop plans and provide operational oversight and supervision in rehabilitating or establishing public works and utilities equipment, facilities, and systems.
  • Advise and assist in establishing the technical requirements for government and commercial works and utilities resources to support government administration (electric power, natural gas, water production and distribution; sewage collection, treatment, and disposal; sanitation; and public facilities).
  • Advise and assist in rehabilitating, establishing, operating, and maintaining government works and utilities systems and agencies.
  • Assist in employing (coordinating) public works and utilities resources to support government administration and CMO.

Public Communications

  • Provide technical expertise, advice, and assistance in identifying and assessing government and commercial communication systems, agencies, services, personnel, resources, and facilities.
  • Determine the capabilities and effectiveness of communication systems and the impact of those systems on CMO.
  • Develop plans and provide operational oversight and supervision in rehabilitating or establishing communication equipment, facilities, and systems.
  • Advise and assist in establishing the technical requirements for government and commercial communications resources to support government administration (postal services, telephone, telegraph, radio, television, computer systems, and print media).
  • Advise and assist in rehabilitating, establishing, and maintaining government communications systems and agencies.
  • Assist in employing public communications resources to support government administration and CMO.

Organization

3-25. See Figure 3-4, for the composition of the CACOM public facilities team.

ECONOMICS AND COMMERCE TEAM, CACOM

3-26. The CACOM economics and commerce team (Figure 3-4) consists of functional specialists in food and agriculture, economic development, and civilian supply. It provides technical expertise, planning assistance, and staff advice to the supported command. The team assesses resources and systems by sector and determines the impact of those on CMO. Team members coordinate with FN administrators and representatives of other associated organizations to support the commander's objectives. The economics and commerce team provides recommendations and direction to maintain, sustain, and improve FN services.

Capabilities

3-27. Capabilities of each functional specialty within the CACOM economics and commerce team are as follows:

Food and Agriculture

  • Provide technical expertise, advice, and assistance in identifying and assessing food and agriculture systems, agencies, services, personnel, resources, and facilities.
  • Determine the capabilities and effectiveness of food and agricultural systems and the impact of those systems on CMO.
  • Develop plans, policies, and procedures and provide operational oversight and supervision in rehabilitating or establishing food and agricultural systems and agencies for producing, processing, storing, transporting, distributing, and marketing.
  • Coordinate the use of FN government and commercial food and agricultural resources for military use, for CMO, and in support of government administration.
  • Advise and assist in establishing the technical requirements for food and agricultural resources (livestock, poultry, grain, vegetables, fruit, fish, fiber, and forestry) management to support government administration.
  • Advise and assist in rehabilitating, establishing, delivering, and maintaining food and agricultural systems and agencies.
  • Assist in coordinating FN, IO, NGO, and U.S. assistance, and resources to support food and agricultural systems as part of CMO (crop and livestock improvement, agricultural training, and education).

Economic Development

  • Provide technical expertise, advice, and assistance in monitoring and assessing the FN economy, economic systems, commercial activities, agencies, services, personnel, and resources.
  • Determine the capabilities and effectiveness of economic systems and the impact of those systems on CMO.
  • Develop plans, policies, and procedures and provide operational oversight and supervision in rehabilitating or establishing economic and commercial systems, agencies, and resources.
  • Advise and assist with budgetary systems, monetary and fiscal policies, revenue-producing systems and treasury operations.
  • Advise and assist in price control and rationing programs.
  • Develop and implement plans to prevent black-market activities.
  • Conduct liaison and coordinate with local government administration agencies and commercial enterprises in support of CMO.
  • Advise and assist in restoring, establishing, organizing, and operating economic and commerce systems, agencies, and organizations.
  • Advise and assist in the technical administrative requirements of employing economic controls (price controls, rationing programs, prevention of black-market activities, monetary and fiscal policies, and labor).
  • Advise and assist in employing local commercial resources, including labor, to support government administration, CMO, and military use.
  • Assist in coordinating FN, IO, NGO, and U.S. assistance and resources to support local economic development as part of CMO.
  • Advise and assist the SJA and contracting officials in FN cultural intricacies. Ensure compliance with international laws and conventions regarding use of labor.

Civilian Supply

  • Provide technical expertise, advice, and assistance in identifying and assessing public and commercial supply systems, agencies, services, personnel, resources, and facilities.
  • Determine the capabilities and effectiveness of civilian supply systems and the impact of those systems on CMO.
  • Determine the availability of local supplies.
  • Identify private and public property available for military use.
  • Develop plans and provide operational oversight and supervision in rehabilitating or establishing government and commercial supply systems and facilities.
  • Coordinate the use of government, commercial, and private property, facilities, supplies, equipment, and other resources for military use, for CMO, and in support of government administration.
  • Advise and assist in rehabilitating, establishing, and maintaining government and commercial supply systems and agencies.
  • Advise and assist in the technical administrative requirements for government and commercial supply resources to support government administration (transportation; storage; distribution, including rationing; and the use of captured and salvaged items).
  • Advise and assist the SJA and contracting officials in FN cultural intricacies when acquiring and using local resources (supplies, equipment, and facilities).
  • Establish policies and procedures on custody and administration of public and private property.
  • Assist in coordinating FN, IO, NGO, and U.S. assistance and resources to support local civilian supply needs as part of CMO.

Organization

3-28. See Figure 3-4, for the composition of the CACOM economics and commerce team.

SPECIAL FUNCTIONS TEAM, CACOM

3-29. The CACOM special functions team (Figure 3-4) consists of functional specialists in emergency services, environmental management, cultural relations, civil information operations, and DC operations. It provides technical expertise, planning assistance, and staff advice to the supported command. The team assesses resources and systems by sector and determines the impact of those systems on CMO. Team members coordinate with FN administrators and representatives of other associated organizations to support the commander's objectives. The special functions team provides recommendations and direction to maintain, sustain, and improve FN services.

Capabilities

3-30. Capabilities of each functional specialty within the CACOM special functions team are as follows:

Emergency Services

  • Provide technical expertise, advice, and assistance in identifying and assessing government emergency services capabilities and resources to respond to the employment of NBC weapons and hazardous material (HazMat) incident.
  • Determine the capabilities and effectiveness of emergency service systems and the impact of those systems on CMO.
  • Develop plans and provide operational oversight and supervision in rehabilitating or establishing emergency services systems, equipment, and facilities.
  • Advise and assist in establishing the technical requirements for government emergency services systems to support government administration during an NBC or a HazMat incident (police and law enforcement administration, fire protection, emergency rescue, and restoration of other vital services).
  • Advise and assist in rehabilitating, establishing, and maintaining government emergency services plans, policies, and procedures.
  • Assist in coordinating and employing emergency services resources to support government administration, CMO, and military use (mitigation, detection, warning, response, and recovery).
  • Assist in coordinating FN, IO, NGO, and U.S. government assistance and resources to support local government emergency service systems as part of CMO.

Environmental Management

  • Provide technical expertise, advice, and assistance in identifying and assessing FN environmental and pollution control systems, agencies, services, personnel, resources, and facilities.
  • Determine the capabilities and effectiveness of environmental and pollution control systems and the impact of those systems on CMO.
  • Develop plans and provide operational oversight and supervision in rehabilitating or establishing environmental resource management systems, agencies, equipment, and facilities.
  • Coordinate FN government and private environmental management resources for military use, for CMO, and in support of government administration to mitigate, prepare, respond to, and recover environmental activities.
  • Advise and assist in establishing the technical requirements for environmental management services and resources to support government administration (plans, policies, and procedures to protect natural resources and provide pollution control).
  • Advise and assist in rehabilitating, establishing, delivering, and maintaining government environmental management systems and agencies.
  • Advise, assist, and support the coordination of FN, IO, NGO, and U.S. assistance and resources to support local government environmental management as part of CMO.

Cultural Relations

  • Provide technical expertise, advice, and assistance on FN social and cultural matters and determine the impact of those matters on CMO.
  • Assist in familiarizing, educating, and training U.S. personnel in the FN social, cultural, religious, ethnic characteristics, codes of behavior, and language.
  • Advise and assist in locating, identifying, preserving, and protecting significant cultural property.
  • Develop plans and provide operational oversight and supervision in protecting, preserving, and restoring significant cultural property and facilities (religious buildings, shrines, and consecrated places, museums, monuments, art, archives, and libraries).
  • Advise and assist in establishing the technical requirements for government, community, and private systems and agencies to protect, preserve, and restore cultural property.
  • Advise and assist in rehabilitating, establishing, operating, and maintaining cultural property systems and agencies.
  • Assist in locating, identifying, and safeguarding cultural property and in determining ownership.
  • Assist in coordinating FN, IO, NGO, and U.S. Government assistance and resources to support local government relations as part of CMO.

Civil Information

  • Advise and assist in developing and coordinating public relations activities to support government administration, CMO, and the "single voice" message.
  • Advise, assist, develop plans, and provide operational oversight and supervision in the employment of civil information (mass media) agencies and resources to support CMO (radio, TV, print, and newspaper), both public and private.
  • Assist PSYOP forces in planning, developing, and disseminating proclamations, ordinances, and notices.
  • Advise and assist the public affairs officer (PAO) in maintaining cultural awareness while dealing with the media.
  • Recommend information control and civil censorship policies.

Dislocated Civilians

  • Provide technical expertise, advice, and assistance in identifying and assessing DC activities.
  • Develop plans and provide operational oversight and supervision in protecting, caring for, controlling, processing, and repatriating DCs in support of CMO.
  • Assist in planning, organizing, and coordinating FN, IO, NGO, U.S. assistance, and resources to support local government care, control, processing, and repatriation of DCs as part of CMO.

Organization

3-31. See Figure 3-4, for the composition of the CACOM special functions team.

LINGUIST TEAM, CACOM

3-32. The CACOM linguist team (Figure 3-4) provides language expertise to supported commands. It also provides language-training management for the CACOM.

Capabilities

3-33. Capabilities of the CACOM linguist team are to--

  • Manage the command language program.
  • Provide limited translation capability.
  • Manage interpreter support.
  • Coordinate the production of soldier handbooks for common phrases in target country or region.

Organization

3-34. See Figure 3-4, for the composition of the CACOM linguist team.

CIVIL AFFAIRS PLANNING TEAMS

3-35. The CACOM provides three types of planning teams (Figure 3-5) to augment the CMO staffs of unified, subunified, Service component, and functional commands. The three types of planning teams are the CAP3T, the CAPT-B, and the CAPT-A. The CAP3T is organic to each CACOM and provides the combatant commander with CMO staff augmentation. Each CACOM also has attached CAPT-As and CAPT-Bs--one CAPT-B for every subunified command or component Service HQ and one CAPT-A for every functional command or corps supported by the CACOM. Consequently, each CACOM has varying numbers of CAPT-Bs and CAPT-As (refer to individual unit MTOE for specific numbers).

Figure 3-5. USAR CA Planning Team Composition

CAP3T

3-36. The CAP3T (Figure 3-5) provides technical expertise and staff assistance to unified commands in planning, coordinating, and executing CA activities in support of CMO.

Capabilities

3-37. Capabilities of the CAP3T are to--

  • Provide responsive CMO staff augmentation to unified commands.
  • Provide 24-hour CMO staff planning and augmentation to supported commands.
  • Plan and coordinate CA activities in support of CMO.
  • Advise the unified command on the employment of CA capabilities and issues relevant to the civilian populace and provide coordination and staff assistance as required.
  • Produce initial CMO estimate, CA and CMO annex.
  • Provide cultural expertise.
  • Plan, coordinate, and recommend CA force structure.

Organization

3-38. See Figure 3-5, for the composition of the CAP3T.

CAPT-B

3-39. The CAPT-B (Figure 3-5) provides CMO planning support to subunified command and service component HQ.

Capabilities

3-40. Capabilities of the CAPT-B are to--

  • Provide responsive CMO staff augmentation.
  • Augment the CMO staff of a theater Service or functional component HQ.
  • Establish and operate a CMOC.
  • Augment or support a country team.
  • Augment or support a CAP3T.
  • Plan, coordinate, and direct CA activities in support of CMO.
  • Advise the supported command on the employment of CA capabilities and issues relevant to the civilian populace and provide coordination and staff assistance as required.
  • Produce initial CMO estimate, CA and CMO annex.
  • Provide cultural expertise.
  • Plan, coordinate, and recommend CA force structure.

Organization

3-41. See Figure 3-5, for the composition of the CAPT-B.

CAPT-A

3-42. The CAPT-A (Figure 3-5) provides CMO planning support to functional and corps or JTF-level commands.

Capabilities

3-43. Capabilities of the CAPT-A are to--

  • Provide responsive CMO staff augmentation of functional commands and corps-level or JTF-level commands.
  • Augment and support a country team.
  • Conduct transition activities with follow-on USAR CA forces.
  • Establish a CMOC.
  • Train and prepare other forces to support CMO.
  • Advise the supported command on the employment of CA capabilities and issues relevant to the civilian populace and provide coordination and staff assistance as required.
  • Produce the initial CMO estimate, CA and CMO annex.
  • Conduct the initial area assessment.
  • Provide cultural and language expertise.

Organization

3-44. See Figure 3-5, for the composition of the CAPT-A.

CIVIL AFFAIRS BRIGADE (USAR)

3-45. All CA brigades in the Army inventory are in the USAR. Each is aligned with a corps or theater Army component. CA brigades support corps, JTF, theater support commands (TSCs), and theater Army area commands (TAACOMs). Each CA brigade (Figure 3-6) provides predeployment C2 of attached battalions and provides staff support to other component Services and joint theater staffs as required. It accomplishes its mission through attachment of subordinate elements to supported commands. It is also the lowest level CA unit with all 16 CA functional specialties.

Figure 3-6. Civil Affairs Brigade (USAR)

CAPABILITIES

3-46. Capabilities of the CA brigade (USAR) are to--

  • Augment CMO staffs of a TSC, corps, or JTF.
  • Establish procedures and processes for FNS.
  • Establish procedures and processes for minimizing interference by the civilian populace with military operations.
  • Provide information to the intelligence system.
  • Act as the focal point (in coordination with PSYOP) for cultural considerations.
  • Provide technical expertise in 16 functional specialties to supported commands as needed.
  • Provide interface between local civil authorities and U.S. military forces.

ORGANIZATION

3-47. The CA brigade (USAR) (Figure 3-6) consists of an HHC and one or more CA battalions.

HEADQUARTERS AND HEADQUARTERS COMPANY, CA BRIGADE

3-48. The HHC, CA brigade (Figure 3-7) provides predeployment C2, staff planning, and staff supervision over brigade operations.

Figure 3-7. Typical HHC, CA Brigade Structure

CAPABILITIES

3-49. The HHC, CA brigade provides the organization, command authority, and staff capacity to execute the capabilities of the brigade.

ORGANIZATION

3-50. The HHC, CA brigade (Figure 3-7), has three major elements--the company HQ, the brigade HQ, and attached CA planning teams (CAPT-As and CAPT-Bs). The brigade HQ consists of an economics and commerce team and a G1, G2, G3, G4, public facilities team, special functions team, government team, linguist team, and communications section. The brigade HQ provides C2 of assigned and attached elements. The company HQ provides the necessary personnel to support the HQ with supplies and arrange for equipment maintenance. The brigade staff and specialty function team organizations and responsibilities are identical to a CACOM. (See details under description of the CACOM.)

CIVIL AFFAIRS BRIGADE PLANNING TEAMS

3-51. The CA brigade provides two types of planning teams to augment the CMO staffs of subunified, Service component, and functional commands--the CAPT-B and the CAPT-A. Each of these teams has a separate TOE and is assigned to the CA brigade HHC. The basis of allocation is one CAPT-B for every subunified command or component service HQ, and one CAPT-A for every functional command or corps supported by the brigade. Each CA brigade, therefore, has varying numbers of CAPT-Bs and CAPT-As. (Refer to individual unit MTOE for specific numbers.) See Figure 3-5, for composition of the CAPT-B and CAPT-A.

CIVIL AFFAIRS BRIGADE SPECIALTY TEAMS

3-52. The CA brigade has four specialty teams (government, public facilities, economics and commerce, and special functions) and a linguist team (Figure 3-8) organic to the HHC. These teams provide technical expertise and assist the staff in planning, coordinating, and executing CA activities in support of CMO.

Figure 3-8. CA Brigade Specialty Teams

CIVIL AFFAIRS BATTALIONS

3-53. The Army inventory has 25 CA battalions (24 in the USAR and 1 in the AC). The battalions are organized under three different tables of organization and equipment (TOEs)--AC CA battalion, RC CA battalion, and RC CA battalion (SO). The battalions provide CA generalist and limited functional specialty expertise to supported commands.

CIVIL AFFAIRS BATTALION (USAR)

3-54. The mission of the CA battalion (USAR) (Figure 3-9) is to plan and conduct CA activities in support of CMO for division, corps support command (COSCOM), and area support group (ASG), or other HQ (down to brigade level), based on mission requirements.

Figure 3-9. CA Battalion (USAR)

CAPABILITIES

3-55. Capabilities of the CA battalion (USAR) are to--

  • Provide CA units and elements to support the battalion, brigade, division, COSCOM, and ASG CMO staffs.
  • Plan, train, and prepare U.S. and FN military forces to execute CA activities in support of CMO.
  • Provide cultural expertise to the supported command.
  • Plan and coordinate PRC.
  • Plan and coordinate MCA.
  • Plan and coordinate HA.
  • Plan and coordinate emergency services.
  • Plan and coordinate FNS.
  • Provide support and assistance to interagency, NGO, IO, and FN agencies.
  • Coordinate PSYOP activities in relation to the attitudes and behavior of the civilian population.
  • Provide functional expertise in public administration, public facilities, public health, civilian supply, and DC operations.
  • Task organize to provide two CAPT-Bs and four CAPT-As.
  • Plan and coordinate disaster assistance.

ORGANIZATION

3-56. The CA battalion (USAR) (Figure 3-9) has an HHC, a functional specialty company, and three CA companies, each composed of a company HQ (Civil Affairs Team Bravo [CATB]) and four Civil Affairs Teams Alpha (CATAs). The battalion HQ is commonly referred to as the Civil Affairs Team Charlie (CATC).

HHC, CIVIL AFFAIRS BATTALION (USAR)

3-57. The HHC, CA battalion (USAR) (Figure 3-10), consists of a HQ company and a battalion HQ (CATC).

Figure 3-10. HHC, CA Battalion (USAR)

Command Group

3-58. The command group consists of a commander, an executive officer, and a CSM. Responsibilities of personnel within the command group include the following:

  • The battalion commander exercises command of the battalion and all attached elements.
  • The executive officer performs duties similar to those of a deputy commander and chief of staff. He directs the battalion staff and assigns specific responsibilities to prepare plans, orders, reports, and other staff actions. He assumes the duties of the commander in his absence.
  • The CSM is the battalion's senior NCO. He is the primary advisor to the commander and his staff on matters pertaining to enlisted personnel. He monitors the implementation of established policies and standards on the performance, training, appearance, and conduct of enlisted personnel. He provides counsel and guidance to NCOs and other enlisted personnel.

Coordinating Staff Group

3-59. The coordinating staff group consists of an adjutant (S1), an operations and training officer/intelligence officer (S3/S2), and a logistics officer (S4). Responsibilities of personnel within the coordinating staff group include the following:

  • The S1 is the principal staff officer for all PSS matters and other administrative matters not specifically assigned to another coordinating staff officer. The specific areas of responsibility are strength management, casualty reporting, and morale support activities.
  • The S3 is the principal staff officer for all matters pertaining to the organization, training, planning, and operations of the battalion. He has overall staff responsibility for communications, OPSEC, force development, and modernization. The S3 also has S2 responsibilities, including all aspects of intelligence, counterintelligence, and security support in garrison. The S3 plans, coordinates, approves, and directs the S2 section in intelligence analysis, production, and dissemination. He identifies the need for and assists in planning and coordinating intelligence support and intelligence ADP support. He is responsible for the battalion's information security, information systems security, and personnel security. He conducts and coordinates OPSEC and force protection needs.
  • The S4 is the principal staff officer for all logistic matters. Specific responsibilities include logistics operations, plans, maintenance, and transportation. The S4 has staff planning and supervision over procurement, contracting, real property control, food service, force protection, and clothing exchange. He performs additional special staff officer duties as the resource management officer.

FUNCTIONAL SPECIALTY COMPANY, CA BATTALION (USAR)

3-60. The functional specialty company (Figure 3-11) provides technical expertise and staff assistance in planning, coordinating, and executing CA activities in support of CMO. Functional specialties include public administration, DCs, civilian supply, public facilities, and public health.

Figure 3-11. Functional Specialty Company, CA Battalion (USAR)

CAPABILITIES

3-61. Capabilities of the specialty teams of the functional specialty company are as follows:

Public Administration Team

  • Provide technical expertise, advice, and assistance in identifying and assessing FN public administration systems, agencies, services, personnel, and resources.
  • Determine capabilities and effectiveness of public administration systems and their impact on CMO.
  • Develop plans and provide operational oversight and supervision for rehabilitating or establishing public administration systems, agencies, and resources.
  • Provide liaison and coordinate with FN government administrators and agencies in support of CMO.
  • Advise and assist in restoring, establishing, organizing, and operating public government systems and agencies.
  • Advise and assist in developing technical administrative requirements, policies, and procedures for providing government services to the local population.

Dislocated Civilian Team

  • Provide technical expertise, advice, and assistance in identifying and assessing DC activities.
  • Develop plans and provide operational oversight and supervision for the protection, care, control, process, and repatriation of DCs in support of CMO.
  • Assist in planning, organizing, and coordinating FN, IO, NGO, U.S. government assistance and resources to support local government care, control, processing, and repatriation of DCs as part of CMO.

Civilian Supply Team

  • Advise and assist in identifying and assessing public and commercial supply resource availability and capabilities.
  • Develop plans in rehabilitating or establishing government and commercial supply systems and facilities.
  • Coordinate the use of government and commercial supplies, equipment, and other resources for military use, CMO, and government administration support.
  • Advise and assist in rehabilitating, establishing, and maintaining government and commercial supply systems and agencies.
  • Advise and assist in the technical administrative requirements for government and commercial supply resources to support government administration (transportation, storage, distribution to include rationing, and use of captured and salvaged items).
  • Advise and assist the SJA and contracting officials in FN cultural intricacies when acquiring and using local resources, such as supplies, equipment, and facilities.
  • Assist in coordinating FN, IO, NGO, and U.S. Government assistance and resources to support local civilian supply needs as part of CMO.

Public Works and Utilities Team

  • Provide technical expertise, advice, and assistance in identifying and assessing government and commercial works and utilities capabilities and resources.
  • Develop plans for rehabilitating or establishing works and utilities equipment, facilities, and systems.
  • Advise and assist in establishing the technical requirements for government and commercial works and utilities resources to support government administration, such as electric power, natural gas, water production and distribution; sewage collection, treatment, and disposal; sanitation; and public facilities.
  • Advise and assist in rehabilitating, establishing, operating, and maintaining government works and utilities systems and agencies.
  • Assist in employing (coordinating) public works and utilities resources to support government administration and CMO.

Public Health Team

  • Advise and assist in identifying and assessing public and private health and sanitation needs, services, capabilities, facilities, personnel, and resources.
  • Develop plans for rehabilitating or establishing public health systems, agencies, equipment, and facilities.
  • Coordinate the use of FN government and private health resources for military use, CMO, and in support of government administration.
  • Advise and assist in establishing the technical requirements for public health services and resources to support government administration, such as clinics, hospitals, pharmacies, food preparation and storage, transportation (ambulance), skilled personnel, and education.
  • Advise and assist in rehabilitating, establishing, delivering, and maintaining government public health systems and agencies.
  • Assist in coordinating FN, IO, NGO, U.S. Government assistance and resources to support local government public health systems as part of CMO.
  • Advise and assist FN, IO, NGO, and U.S. Government agencies in preventing, controlling, and treating diseases (education, immunization, and sanitation).

ORGANIZATION

3-62. See Figure 3-11, for the composition of the functional specialty company, CA battalion (USAR).

CIVIL AFFAIRS COMPANY, CIVIL AFFAIRS BATTALION (USAR)

3-63. The CA battalion (USAR) has three CA companies, each with one company HQ (CATB) and four CATAs (Figure 3-12). The CATB provides CMO staff support to brigade-level organizations, and the CATAs provide CMO staff support to battalion-level organizations.

Figure 3-12. CA Company, CA Battalion (USAR)

CAPABILITIES

3-64. Capabilities of the CA company of the CA battalion (USAR) are to--

  • Plan, coordinate, and conduct CA activities in support of CMO.
  • Support the civil administration mission.
  • Provide supported command with advice, coordination, and staff assistance on the employment of CA capabilities and issues relating to the civil populace.
  • Update CMO estimates, CA and CMO annex.
  • Update area assessments.
  • Provide cultural and language expertise.
  • Provide liaison to interagency, NGO, IO, and FN agencies.
  • Assist in establishing and operating a CMOC.

ORGANIZATION

3-65. See Figure 3-12 for the composition of the CA company, CA battalion (USAR).

CIVIL AFFAIRS TEAM A (CATA), CA COMPANY, CA BATTALION (USAR)

3-66. The CATA (Figure 3-12) provides CMO planning and assessment support to maneuver commanders.

CAPABILITIES

3-67. Capabilities of the CATA are to--

  • Provide CMO staff augmentation and CA planning and assessment support to maneuver commanders.
  • Maintain direct data and voice communications with conventional and interagency elements with both classified and unclassified connectivity.
  • Provide linguistic, regional, and cultural expertise to supported commanders.
  • Plan and support CMO conducted by military forces.
  • Identify and facilitate FNS.
  • Conduct liaison with civilian authorities.
  • Minimize civilian interference with military operations.
  • Conduct area studies and area assessments.

ORGANIZATION

3-68. See Figure 3-12, for the composition of the CATA of a CA company, CA battalion (USAR).

CIVIL AFFAIRS BATTALION (SPECIAL OPERATIONS)

3-69. The Army has three CA battalions (SO) (Figure 3-13), each aligned with a regional theater Special Operations Command (SOC). The primary mission of the CA battalion (SO) is to support the theater SOC by enhancing the ability of the SOC commander to conduct CMO throughout the spectrum of conflict. They provide theater-oriented, language-trained, and culturally aware CA forces to support the planning, coordination, and execution of CMO conducted by SOF during peacetime, stability and support operations, and war. CA battalions are most effective when employed in support of SF units. A versatile organization, the CA battalion (SO) provides CMO staff support to all echelons of SO, as well as task-organized elements to support Special Forces operational detachments (SFODs).

Figure 3-13. CA Battalion (SO)

CAPABILITIES

3-70. Capabilities of the CA battalion (SO) are to--

  • Train and prepare CA elements and other forces to support CMO.
  • Plan, coordinate, and conduct CA activities in support of CMO.
  • Provide CA support to the following SO missions and collateral activities:
    • Foreign internal defense (FID).
    • Unconventional warfare (UW).
    • HA.
    • Coalition support.
    • Information operations.
    • Security assistance (SA).
    • Countermine activities (CM).
    • Counterdrug (CD).
    • Combat search and rescue (CSAR).
  • Prepare CA-related intelligence preparation of the battlespace (IPB), estimates, plans, annexes, and assessments.
  • Train SFODAs on CMO.
  • Plan, coordinate, and supervise the execution of H/CA projects.
  • Plan and conduct CA activities in support of MCA, HA, Emergency Services, and FNS.
  • Operate in austere environments in support of SFODAs.
  • Provide cultural and language expertise.
  • Rapidly deploy by all means of infiltration.
  • Maintain voice and data communications connectivity with supported SOF elements.

ORGANIZATION

3-71. The CA battalion (SO) (Figure 3-13) consists of a battalion HQ detachment (CATC), battalion headquarters support company (HSC), and three CA companies (CATB).

HEADQUARTERS DETACHMENT (CATC), CA BATTALION (SO)

3-72. The battalion HQ detachment exercises C2 of the battalion and any attachments. Known as the CATC, the battalion HQ detachment (Figure 3-14) has a battalion HQ, primary and special staff sections, and three CAPT-Bs.

Figure 3-14. Headquarters Detachment (CATC), CA Battalion (SO)

CAPABILITIES

3-73. Command and staff responsibilities of the CATC elements are as follows:

Command Group

  • The battalion commander exercises command of the battalion and all attached elements.
  • The executive officer performs duties similar to those of a deputy commander and chief of staff. He directs the battalion staff and assigns specific responsibilities to prepare plans, orders, reports, and other staff actions. The executive officer assumes the duties of the commander in his absence.
  • The CSM is the battalion's senior NCO. He is the primary advisor to the commander and his staff on matters pertaining to enlisted personnel. He monitors the implementation of established policies and standards on the performance, training, appearance, and conduct of enlisted personnel. The CSM provides counsel and guidance to NCOs and other enlisted personnel.

Coordinating Staff Group

  • The S1 is the principal staff officer for all PSS matters and other administrative matters not specifically assigned to another coordinating staff officer. The specific areas of responsibility are strength management, casualty reporting, and morale support activities.
  • The S2 is responsible for all aspects of intelligence, counterintelligence, and security support in garrison. The S2 plans, coordinates, approves, and directs the S2 section in intelligence analysis, production, and dissemination. He identifies the need for and assists in the planning and coordination of intelligence support and intelligence ADP support. He is responsible for the battalion's information security, information systems security, and personnel security. He conducts and coordinates OPSEC and force protection needs.
  • The S3 is the principal staff officer for all matters pertaining to the organization, training, planning, and operations of the battalion. The S3 has overall staff responsibility for OPSEC, force development, and modernization.
  • The S4 is the principal staff officer for all logistic matters. Specific responsibilities include logistics operations, plans, and transportation. The S4 has staff planning and supervision over procurement, contracting, real property control, food service, force protection, and clothing exchange. He performs additional special staff officer duties as the resource management officer.
  • The battalion legal officer (Judge Advocate General) is the primary advisor to the commander and his staff on legal matters. He advises on matters involving military law, U.S. domestic law, foreign law, SOFAs, international law, operational law, and ROE. He reviews all mission taskings, plans, and orders to make sure they adequately address legal issues.
  • The battalion engineer is the primary advisor to the commander and staff on engineer matters. He coordinates and exercises technical supervision over the engineer aspects of H/CA and MCA missions. He reviews all mission taskings, plans, and orders to make sure they adequately address engineer issues.
  • The signal officer is the primary staff officer for all signal matters. He plans signal operations, prepares the signal annex to operation orders (OPORDs), and recommends employment of CA battalion signal assets. He is also the battalion information systems management officer with staff responsibility for automation. He is also the battalion communications security (COMSEC) officer and supervises the battalion COMSEC custodian. He coordinates and exercises technical supervision over the training of organic communications personnel.

ORGANIZATION

3-74. See Figure 3-14, for the organization of the HQ detachment (CATC), CA battalion (SO).

HEADQUARTERS SUPPORT COMPANY, CA BATTALION (SO)

3-75. The HSC, CA battalion (SO) (Figure 3-15) provides routine administrative and logistics support to the battalion HQ detachment, the company's organic elements, and the CA companies. The support company commander commands all personnel and elements assigned or attached to the company.

Figure 3-15. HSC, CA Battalion (SO)

CAPABILITIES

3-76. Capabilities of the battalion HSC, CA battalion (SO) are to--

  • Maintain an organic equipment capability to deploy with and support SOF.
  • Provide CMO staff support and CA planning and assessment support to SOF commanders.
  • Maintain direct voice and data communications with supported SOF elements.
  • Provide task-organized signal support to deploying CATAs.

ORGANIZATION

3-77. See Figure 3-15 for the organization of the HSC, CA battalion (SO).

CIVIL AFFAIRS COMPANY, CA BATTALION (SO)

3-78. The CA company, CA battalion (SO) (Figure 3-16) has a company HQ (CATB), six CATAs, and one civic action team (CACT). The company provides peacetime C2 and supervision of company operations and administration. It coordinates and conducts CA activities in support of CMO for SOF elements as directed.

Figure 3-16. Civil Affairs Company, CA Battalion (SO)

CAPABILITIES

3-79. Capabilities of the CA company are to--

  • Maintain an organic equipment capability to deploy with and support SOF.
  • Provide CMO staff support and CA planning and assessment support to SOF elements.
  • Maintain direct voice and data communications with supported SF elements, with both classified and unclassified connectivity.
  • Provide regional, linguistic, and cultural expertise to supported SFOD commanders.
  • Conduct liaison with civilian authorities.
  • Prepare CA annex.
  • Establish CMOC, if required.
  • Identify CA intelligence requirements.
  • Plan, coordinate, and conduct H/CA activities.
  • Train FN military forces in CMO.
  • Coordinate FNS.
  • Deploy by all means of infiltration.
  • Operate in austere environments in support of SFODs.

ORGANIZATION

3-80. See Figure 3-16, for the composition of the CA company, CA battalion (SO).

CIVIL AFFAIRS TEAM A (CATA), CA BATTALION (SO)

3-81. The CATA (Figure 3-17) enhances and extends the ability of SOF commanders to conduct CMO by providing CMO planning and assessment support.

Figure 3-17. CA Team Composition, CA Battalion (SO)

3-82. Capabilities of the CATA are to--

  • Provide CMO staff augmentation and CA planning and assessment support to SOF.
  • Maintain direct data and voice communications with SOF and interagency elements with both classified and unclassified connectivity.
  • Provide linguistic, regional, and cultural expertise to supported commanders.
  • Plan and support CMO conducted by military forces.
  • Identify and facilitate FNS.
  • Conduct liaison with civilian authorities.
  • Minimize civilian interference with military operations.
  • Conduct area studies and area assessments.
  • Deploy by all means of infiltration.
  • Operate in austere environments in support of SFODs.

ORGANIZATION

3-83. See Figure 3-17, for the composition of the CATA, CA battalion (SO).

CIVIC ACTION TEAM (CACT), CA BATTALION (SO)

3-84. The CACT (Figure 3-17) provides limited functional specialty expertise to supported commanders in the conduct of CMO.

CAPABILITIES

3-85. Capabilities of the CACT are to--

  • Provide medical, dental, veterinarian, and engineer functional expertise to SOF elements.
  • Plan, coordinate, and conduct area assessments.
  • Advise and assist FN agencies on medical, veterinarian, public health, and engineering activities.
  • Plan, coordinate, and conduct H/CA projects.
  • Deploy by all means of infiltration.
  • Operate in austere environments in support of SFODs.

ORGANIZATION

3-86. See Figure 3-17, for the composition of the CACT, CA battalion (SO).

CIVIL AFFAIRS BATTALION (AC)

3-87. The 96th CA Battalion (Airborne [A]) (Figure 3-18) is the only AC CA battalion. The battalion consists of CA generalists with the mission to provide the unified commanders with rapid operational access to CA assets. It provides rapidly deployable, language-trained, theater-oriented CA forces to support the planning and execution of CMO during peacetime, stability and support operations, and war. It is the only CA unit available for immediate deployment. The 96th performs CA generalist tasks across the range of military operations until RC CA forces can be mobilized and deployed to the theater.

Figure 3-18. Civil Affairs Battalion (AC)

CAPABILITIES

3-88. The capabilities of the CA battalion (AC) are to--

  • Plan, train, and prepare U.S. and FN military forces to execute CA activities in support of CMO.
  • Conduct CA activities in support of SOF and conventional forces.
  • Provide cultural and linguistic expertise to the supported command.
  • Plan and coordinate PRC.
  • Plan and coordinate MCA.
  • Plan and coordinate HA.
  • Plan and coordinate emergency services.
  • Plan and coordinate FNS.
  • Provide support and assistance to interagency, NGO, IO, and FN agencies.
  • Supplement information operations and PSYOP plans.
  • Deploy with classified and unclassified communications capability to access the local area network (LAN), wide area network (WAN), global phone, and satellite communications (SATCOM).
  • Deploy rapidly within 24 to 96 hours by all means of infiltration.
  • Operate independently in austere environments, within the constraints of force protection, with minimal support.

ORGANIZATION

3-89. The CA battalion (AC) (Figure 3-18) consists of an HHC and five regionally aligned companies, each composed of one company HQ (CATB) and six CATAs. The battalion HQ is commonly referred to as a CATC. The AC battalion can also form two CAPT-Bs from organic HHC assets and five CAPT-As, one each from the respective company HQ. These task-organized teams provide initial planning capabilities to supported strategic and operational CMO staffs. Figure 3-19 shows the composition of the CA battalion (AC).

Figure 3-19. Civil Affairs Team Composition, CA Battalion (AC)

HHC, CIVIL AFFAIRS BATTALION (AC)

3-90. The HHC, CA battalion (AC) (Figure 3-20) has two major elements: a HQ company and a battalion HQ. It also has the capability to form one or more CAPT-Bs. Known as the CATC, the HHC provides C2, staff planning, and supervision of battalion operations and administration.

Figure 3-20. HHC, CA Battalion (AC)

CAPABILITIES

3-91. The HHC, CA battalion (AC) provides the organization, command authority, and staff capacity to train, resource, and deploy CA forces worldwide. The command and staff responsibilities of the battalion HQ elements are as follows:

Command Group

  • The battalion commander exercises command of the battalion and all attached elements.
  • The executive officer performs duties similar to those of a deputy commander and chief of staff. He directs the battalion staff and assigns specific responsibilities to prepare plans, orders, reports, and other staff actions. He assumes the duties of the commander in the commander's absence.
  • The CSM is the battalion's senior NCO and is the primary advisor to the commander and staff on matters pertaining to enlisted personnel and the NCO corps. The CSM monitors the implementation of established policies and standards on the performance, training, appearance, and conduct of enlisted personnel. The CSM provides counsel and guidance to NCOs and other enlisted personnel.

Coordinating Staff Group

  • The adjutant (S1) is the principal staff officer for all PSS matters and other administrative matters not specifically assigned to another coordinating staff officer. The specific areas of responsibility are strength management, casualty reporting, and morale support activities.
  • The intelligence officer (S2) is the principal staff officer for all aspects of intelligence, counterintelligence, and security support in garrison. He plans, coordinates, approves, and directs all battalion-level intelligence analysis, production, and dissemination. He identifies the need for, and assists in the planning and coordination of intelligence support and intelligence ADP support. He is responsible for the battalion's information security, information systems security, and personnel security. He conducts and coordinates OPSEC and force protection needs.
  • The operations and training officer (S3) is the principal staff officer for all matters pertaining to the organization, training, planning, and operations of the battalion. The S3 has overall staff responsibility for OPSEC, force development, and modernization.
  • The logistics officer (S4) is the principal staff officer for all logistic matters. Specific responsibilities include logistics operations, plans and transportation. The S4 has staff planning and supervision over procurement, contracting, real property control, food service, force protection, and clothing exchange. He performs additional special staff officer duties as the resource management officer.
  • The CE officer is the principal advisor for all communications and automation. Specifically, he ensures open, secure communication and data links to forces deployed worldwide. He ensures capabilities for stand-alone peacetime engagement missions and compatibility with any supported unit.

Special Staff Group

  • The SJA is the primary advisor to the commander and his staff on legal matters. He advises on matters concerning military law, U.S. domestic law, international law, operational law, foreign law, SOFAs, and ROE. He reviews all mission taskings, orders, and backbriefs to ensure compliance with legal statutes.
  • The battalion surgeon is the primary advisor to the commander and staff for all matters concerning medical readiness and public health affecting the battalion and its attached elements. He directly supervises the battalion medical section. He coordinates and exercises technical supervision over the training of organic and attached medical personnel.
  • The battalion veterinarian is the primary advisor to the commander and staff on all matters of zoonosis, public health, and preventive medicine. He works closely with the battalion surgeon on matters affecting the medical readiness of the battalion and assists in the training of organic and attached medical personnel.

ORGANIZATION

3-92. See Figure 3-20, for the organization of the HHC, CA battalion (AC).

CIVIL AFFAIRS PLANNING TEAM B (CAPT-B), CA BATTALION (AC)

3-93. The CAPT-B (Figure 3-19) provides a rapidly deployable CA planning augmentation capability for theater CINCs and JTFs. It provides operational- and strategic-level initial CA planning capability as well and can support or augment the CAP3T. The CAPT-B provides short-term (30- to 45-day) staff augmentation to JTF and Joint Special Operations Task Force (JSOTF) or country team.

CAPABILITIES

3-94. Capabilities of the CAPT-B are to--

  • Plan, coordinate, and direct CA activities in support of CMO.
  • Establish and operate a CMOC.
  • Augment and support a country team.
  • Provide liaison to interagency, NGO, IO, government, and FN agencies.
  • Conduct transition activities with follow-on USAR CA forces.
  • Augment and support a CAP3T.
  • Train and prepare CA elements and other forces to support CMO.
  • Provide supported command with advice, coordination, and staff assistance on the employment of CA capabilities and issues relating to the civil populace.
  • Produce initial CMO estimate, CA and CMO annex.
  • Provide cultural and language expertise.
  • Plan, coordinate, and recommend CA force structure.
  • Maintain direct data and voice communications with conventional, SOF, and interagency elements with both classified and unclassified connectivity.

ORGANIZATION

3-95. See Figure 3-19, for the composition of CAPT-B.

CIVIL AFFAIRS COMPANY, CA BATTALION (AC)

3-96. The mission of the CA company, CA battalion (AC) (Figure 3-21) is to provide rapidly deployable, regionally aligned, CA generalists in support of unified and subunified commands. The company command group ensures that unit missions complement the CINC's theater engagement plan by directing assets to support priority missions. The company provides C2, staff planning, and supervision of company operations and administration.

Figure 3-21. CA Company, CA Battalion (AC)

CAPABILITIES

3-97. Capabilities of the CA company are to--

  • Maintain an organic equipment capability to deploy with and to support rapid-deployment conventional and SO forces.
  • Provide the organization, command authority, and staff capacity to execute the capabilities of the company.
  • Provide SOF-certified, language-trained, theater-oriented, CA soldiers to supported commands.
  • Provide CMO planning expertise to supported commands.
  • Provide linguistic, regional, and cultural expertise to supported units.
  • Deploy rapidly, within 24 to 96 hours, by infiltration.

ORGANIZATION

3-98. See Figure 3-21 for the organization of the CA company, CA battalion (AC).

COMPANY HEADQUARTERS (CATB), CA CCOMPANY, CA BATTALION (AC)

3-99. The CATB (Figure 3-21) provides CMO planning and assessment support and liaison to maneuver or operational commanders.

CAPABILITIES

3-100. Capabilities of the CATB are to--

  • Maintain an organic equipment capability to deploy with and support rapid deployment conventional and SOF.
  • Provide liaison with theater CINC/SOC and regionally oriented CACOM.
  • Augment battalion, brigade, division, corps, or JTF CMO staffs.
  • Task-organize into CAPT-A when required.
  • Provide CMO planning and staff augmentation to supported commands.
  • Maintain direct data and voice communications with conventional, SOF, and interagency elements with both classified and unclassified connectivity.
  • Deploy rapidly by all means of infiltration.

ORGANIZATION

3-101. See Figure 3-21, for the organization of the CATB.

CIVIL AFFAIRS TEAM A (CATA), CA COMPANY, CA BATTALION (AC)

3-102. The CATA (Figure 3-21) provides the tactical HQ with a rapidly deployable CA asset capable of conducting staff augmentation, planning, and CMO assessments. The CATA conducts general and limited technical assessments based on military occupational specialty (MOS) skills--operations, intelligence, engineer, and medical. Technical assessments require RC CA assets with functional skills. The general assessment or survey conducted by the CATA allows RC functional specialists to complete detailed planning for CMO that other forces will conduct. The essence of the CATA is the ability to deploy rapidly and to support the commander's immediate needs by facilitating or conducting CA activities that support the tactical mission. The CATA provides short-term CMO direct support (90 days) to maneuver battalions, brigades, and divisions.

3-103. At a minimum, each team member possesses the following skills:

  • The team leader supervises and manages the team's functions. He is command-qualified and branch immaterial. He usually possesses a master's degree in international relations. In addition, the team leader is a graduate of the Civil Affairs Officer Course (CAOC), Psychological Operations Course, and the Regional Studies Course. The team leader possesses a theater-specific language capability as well.
  • The team sergeant (MOS 18F) is the senior NCO on the team. He is an SF-qualified Sergeant First Class and a graduate of the Special Forces Operations and Intelligence Course and the CAOC. The team sergeant possesses a theater-specific language capability, as well as one of the four specific SF MOS skills (communications, light and heavy weapons, medical, or engineer and demolitions).
  • The team engineer (MOS 18C) is an SF-qualified Sergeant First Class and graduate of the CAOC. He possesses a theater-specific language capability and can conduct assessments of the HN infrastructure. The team engineer can plan, advise, and assist numerous construction projects to support the CINC's campaign plan. He has the knowledge to carry out civilian and military logistical plans. He can advise and assist the HN in construction projects that improve its infrastructure.
  • The team medical NCO (MOS 18D) is an SF-qualified Sergeant First Class and a graduate of the CAOC. He possesses a theater-specific language capability. The team medical NCO can plan and conduct medical assessments and provide routine, emergency, and preventive medical and health care to civilian and military personnel. He possesses the knowledge to carry out limited veterinarian and dental care, as well as environmental health programs.

3-104. All SF NCOs have a minimum of 4 to 5 years experience in a respective SF group where they develop their military skills and gain regional expertise.

CAPABILITIES

3-105. Capabilities of the CATA are to--

  • Deploy rapidly, within 24 to 48 hours.
  • Provide CMO staff augmentation and CA planning and assessment support to maneuver commanders.
  • Maintain direct data and voice communications with conventional, SOF, and interagency elements with both classified and unclassified connectivity.
  • Provide linguistic, regional, and cultural expertise to supported commanders.
  • Provide general and limited technical assessments (engineering, medical, intelligence).
  • Plan and support CMO conducted by military forces.
  • Identify and facilitate FNS.
  • Conduct liaison with civilian authorities.
  • Minimize civilian interference with military operations.
  • Conduct area studies and area assessments.
  • Establish and operate a CMOC.

ORGANIZATION

3-106. See Figure 3-21, for the organization of the CATA. Also see Figure 3-19, for the composition of the CATA.

CIVIL AFFAIRS PLANNING TEAM A (CAPT-A), CA COMPANY, CA BATTALION (AC)

3-107. The CAPT-A (Figure 3-21) provides short-term (30 to 45 days) staff augmentation to division, brigade, or battalions.

CAPABILITIES

3-108. Capabilities of the CAPT-A are to--

  • Augment and support a country team.
  • Conduct transition activities with follow-on USAR CA forces.
  • Plan, coordinate, and conduct CA activities in support of CMO.
  • Train and prepare CA elements and other forces to support CMO.
  • Provide supported command with advice, coordination, and staff assistance on the employment of CA capabilities and issues relating to the civil populace.
  • Produce initial CMO estimate, CA (CMO) annex.
  • Conduct initial area assessment.
  • Provide cultural and language expertise.
  • Provide liaison to interagency, NGO, IO, and FN agencies.
  • Augment and support a CAP3T.

ORGANIZATION

3-109. See Figure 3-21, for the organization of the CAPT-A. Also see Figure 3-19, for the composition of the CAPT-A.



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