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APPENDIX E

RANGE PROCEDURES AND
RANGE OPERATIONS CHECKLIST

This appendix contains procedures to conduct a live-fire training exercise. These procedures support Army regulations, local range regulations, and established unit training SOPs. Conduct of the training exercise should clearly define and establish details and equipment needed to open and operate the range so it does not have an adverse impact on the soldiers training time. The procedures outlined in this appendix should be followed in order to open the range and conduct effective training.

E-1. RANGE PROCEDURES

Before beginning a live-fire exercise, all personnel must receive an orientation on range operations. The orientation should outline the procedures for conducting the exercise to include the duties of the nonfiring orders. To provide a safe and efficient range operation and effective instruction, the following is an example of personnel and duties that may be required.

a.   OIC. The OIC is responsible for the overall operation of the range before, during, and after live firing.

b.   Range Safety Officer. The range safety officer (RSO) is responsible for the safe operation of the range to include conducting a safety orientation before each scheduled live-fire exercise. He ensures that a brass and ammunition check is made before the unit leaves the range. He ensures that all personnel comply with the safety regulations and procedures prescribed for the conduct of a live-fire exercise. He ensures that a dry-fire exercise is conducted and the weapon is rodded before a firer leaves the firing line. He ensures that all left-handed firers use left-handed firing devices. This officer should not be assigned any other duties.

c.   NCOIC. The NCOIC assists the OIC and safety officer, as required; for example, by supervising enlisted personnel who are supporting the live-fire exercise.

d.   Ammunition Detail. This detail is composed of one or more ammunition handlers whose responsibilities are to break down, issue, receive, account for, and safeguard live ammunition. The detail also collects expended ammunition casings and other residue.

e.   Unit Armorer. The unit armorer repairs the rifles to include replacing parts, as required.

f.   Assistant Instructor. One assistant instructor (AI) is assigned for each one to ten firing points. Each assistant ensures that all firers observe safety regulations and procedures, and he assists firers having problems.

g.   Medical Personnel. They provide medical support as required by regulations governing live-fire exercises.

h.   Control Tower Operators. They raise and lower the targets, time the exposures, sound the audible signal, and give the fire commands. If possible, two men should be chosen to perform these functions.

i.   Maintenance Detail. This detail should be composed of two segments: one to conduct small-arms repair and one to perform minor maintenance on the target-holding mechanisms.

E-2. FIRING ORDER LINE UP

After the range cadre have given the safety and range briefings they will then assemble the soldiers in firing orders in correlation with the number of firing points on that range. After the firing order has been determined, firers will have their weapons rodded and move to the firing line where they will proceed to their assigned firing points keeping their weapons pointed up and downrange at all times.

E-3. TOWER COMMANDS

Simple, standard fire commands are needed to avoid confusion and misunderstanding during live-fire exercises. The following are recommended.

a.   General Commands. The following are general commands and may be altered when necessary.

  • "Firers, assume the _____ position."
  • (Issue the firer ___ rounds of ammunition.)
  • "Coach, secure ___ rounds of ammunition.
  • "Lock one round, load"
  • "Ready on the right?"
  • "Ready on the left?"
  • "Ready on the firing line?"
  • "Commence firing when your targets appear."
  • "Cease firing, lock and clear all weapons."

b.   Grouping Commands.

  • "Firers, assume a good supported prone position."
  • "Lock one of three single rounds, load."
  • "Ready on the right?"
  • "Ready on the left?"
  • "The firing line is ready."
  • "Place your selector lever on semiautomatic."
  • "Commence firing."
  • "Cease-fire, lock and clear your weapons."
  • "Clear on the right?"
  • "Clear on the left?"
  • "The firing line is clear."
  • "Move down to your targets and triangulate your shot group."
  • "After all personnel have triangulated their targets, move back to the firing line."
  • "At this time, make adjustments to your sights."
  • "Repeat all firing commands until grouping standards are met."

c.   Zero Commands.

  • Tower commands are the same as grouping commands.
  • Repeat all firing commands until zeroing standards are met.

d.   Field Firing Exercises. Simple, standard fire commands are needed to avoid confusion during field firing exercises. Commands for exercises from stationary positions are as follows:

  • "Firers, assume a good _____ position."
  • "Lock one magazine of ___ rounds, load."
  • "Ready on the right?"
  • "Ready on the left?"
  • "The firing line is ready."
  • "Place your selector lever on semiautomatic."
  • "Scan your sector."
  • "Cease fire, lock and clear your weapon." (Place the selector lever in the SAFE position.)

(1)   Repeat the first seven commands above, or give the following commands.

(2)   Commands for conduct of fire are minimal and standard. The proper commands are listed in the following paragraphs.

(3)   The range officer relays his commands either by radio or telephone to the pit NCOIC so he can keep abreast of the conduct of fire. Before each firing exercise, the range officer informs the pit NCOIC of the next exercise and any special instructions for target operation; for example, "The next firing will be for zero. Mark targets after each three-round shot group." or for slow fire, "The next firing will be ten rounds, slow fire. Mark targets after each shot."

(4)   RATELOs relay commands to the pit and pass on special instructions to target operators as requested by assistant instructors. RATELOs never identify a firer on a particular firing point. The command "Mark target number ___" indicates that the target has been fired upon but has not withdrawn for marking.

e.   Practice Record Fire and Record Fire. Simple, standard fire commands are needed to avoid confusion and misunderstanding during practice record fire and record fire.

(1)   Practice Record Fire.

  • "Firers, assume a good supported (prone unsupported) position."
  • "Scorers, point out the limits of your lane."
  • "Firers, lock your first magazine, load."
  • "Scan your sector."
  • "Cease fire."
  • "Lock and clear all weapons."

(2)   Record Fire.

  • "Firers, assume a good supported (prone unsupported) position."
  • "Scorers, point out the limits of your sector."
  • "Firers, lock your first 20-round magazine, load."
  • "Scan your sector."
  • "Cease fire."
  • "Lock and clear all weapons."

f.   Rapid Fire Exercises. The following commands are used for rapid-fire exercises:

  • "Lock and clear all weapons."
  • "Clear on the right?"
  • "Clear on the left?"
  • "The firing line is clear."
  • "Firers, assume the _____ position."
  • "Assistants, secure two magazines of five rounds each."

("Issue the firer one magazine of five rounds.")

  • "Lock one magazine, load."
  • "Ready on the right?"
  • "Ready on the left?"
  • "Ready on the firing line?"
  • "Watch your targets."

("Firers assume the appropriate firing position and commence firing when the targets are presented.")

(1)   When all the targets are withdrawn, the range officer checks for slow firers or malfunctions and then allows them to fire.

(2)   The pit NCOIC organizes, orients, and provides safety for the pit detail. The success of KD firing depends on efficient operation of the targets and the close coordination between the pit NCOIC and range officer. All operators must know the proper procedure for operating and marking the target.

(a)   Marking Targets for Zeroing and Slow Fire. Targets are marked quickly after each shot or group of shots without command. During slow fire, the firer has a time limit of one minute for each shot. Twenty seconds is considered the maximum time limit for marking. A marker (spotter) is placed in the hit regardless of its location on the target. Each time the target is marked, the marker is removed from the previous hit, and the hole is pasted. (3-inch markers are used for 100, 200, and 300 meters; 5-inch markers are used for 500 meters.)

(b)   Using Disk Markers. The target markers are painted black on one side and white on the opposite side. They are available in three dimensions: 1 1/2 inches (NSN 6920-00-789-0864), 3 inches (NSN 6920-00-713-8255), and 5 inches (NSN 6920-00-713-8254). The disk spindle may also be procured through supply channels (NSN 6920-00-713-8257).

E-4. RANGE OPERATIONS CHECKLIST

This checklist consists of nine sections, each covering a different topic relating to range operations. The checklist should be modified to include local policy changes to the regulations or SOPs. The person responsible for the training must answer the questions in each section. Ask each question in order. Record each "Yes" answer by placing a check in the GO column. Record a "No" or "Don't know" by checking the NO-GO column. Refer to the checklist to find the GO and NO-GO columns.

When all the questions in a section are asked, look back over the NO-GOs. Contact the people who reported them and ask if they have corrected each problem. If so, change the answer to GO. If any NO-GO remains, analyze it and implement a countermeasure for the shortfall. Afterwards, check to ensure the countermeasures work. Before range operations start, be sure a workable countermeasure is implemented for each safety hazard presented by a NO-GO answer.

Section I. MISSION ANALYSIS

1.

Who will be firing on the range?__________________________________________

 

Number of personnel_______________Units________________________________


2.

What weapons and course will be used?

 

Weapons_______________Course________________________________________


3.

Where will the training be conducted?

 

Range_______________________________________________________________


4.

When is the range scheduled for operations?

 

Date_______________Opens__________Closes__________

Section II. DOUBLE CHECK

Section III. BECOME AN EXPERT

Section IV. DETERMINE REQUIREMENTS

A.   PERSONNEL:

1.  

OIC.

2.  

Safety officer.

3.  

Assistant safety officer.

4.  

NCOIC.

5.  

Ammunition NCO.

6.  

Ammunition personnel (determined by type of range).

7.  

Target detail and target operators.

8.  

Tower operator.

9.  

Concurrent training instructors.

10.  

Assistant instructors.

11.  

RATELO.

12.  

Guards (range requirements).

13.  

Medic(s).

14.  

Air guard.

15.  

Armorer.

16.  

Truck driver (range personnel and equipment).

17.  

Mechanic for vehicles.

18.  

Have you overstaffed your range?

B.   EQUIPMENT:

1.  

Range packet and clearance form.

2.  

Safety fan and diagram if applicable.

3.  

Other safety equipment (aiming circle, compass).

4.  

Appropriate publications pertaining to the training that will be conducted.

5.  

Lesson plans, status reports, and reporting folder.

6.  

Range flag and light (night firing).

7.  

Radios.

8.  

Field telephone and wire.

9.  

292 antenna, if necessary.

10.  

PA set with backup bullhorn(s).

11.  

Concurrent training markers.

12.  

Training aids for concurrent training stations.

13.  

Sandbags.

14.  

Tentage (briefing tent, warm-up tent).

15.  

Space heaters, if needed.

16.  

Colored helmets for control personnel.

17.  

Safety paddles and vehicle flag sets or lights.

18.  

Ambulance or designated vehicle.

19.  

Earplugs.

20.  

Water for drinking and cleaning.

21.  

Scorecards.

22.  

Master score sheet.

23.  

Armorers tools and cleaning equipment for weapons.

24.  

Brooms, shovels, and other cleaning supplies and equipment.

25.  

Tables and chairs, if needed.

26.  

Target accessories.

27.  

Fire extinguishers.

28.  

Tarp, stakes, and rope to cover the ammunition.

29.  

Toilet paper.

30.  

Spare weapons and repair parts as needed.

31.  

Tow bar and slave cables for vehicles.

32.  

Fuel and oil for vehicles and target mechanisms.

Section V. DETERMINE AVAILABLE RESOURCES

1.  

Fill personnel spaces.

2.  

Keep unit integrity.

3.  

Utilize NCOs.

4.  

Coordinate with supporting organizations:

  • Ammunition.
  • Transportation.
  • Training aids.
  • Medics.
  • Weapons.
  • Other equipment.

Section VI. FOOLPROOFING

1.  

Write an overall lesson plan for the range.

2.  

Organize a plan for firing:

  • Determine range organization.
  • Outline courses of fire to be used.
  • Have fire commands typed for use on the range.
  • Set rotation of stations.

3.  

Rehearse concurrent training instructors and assistants.

4.  

Brief RATELO on unique range control radio procedures.

5.  

Brief and rehearse reporting NCO on range operation and all his duties.

6.  

Collect and concentrate equipment for use on the range in one location.

7.  

Obtain training aids.

8.  

Pick up targets from range warehouse, if required.

9.  

Report to range control for safety briefing (if required) and sign for any special items.

10.  

Publish LOI:

  • Uniform of range and firing personnel (helmets and earplugs).
  • Mode of transportation, departure times and places.
  • Methods of messing to be used.
  • Any special requirements being placed on units.

Section VII. OCCUPYING THE RANGE AND CONDUCTING TRAINING

A.   OCCUPY THE RANGE:

1.  

Request permission to occupy the range.

2.  

Establish good communications.

3.  

Have designated areas prepared:

  • Parking.
  • Ammunition point.
  • Medical station.
  • Water point.
  • Concurrent training.
  • Mess.
  • Helipad.
  • Armorer.

4.  

Inspect range for operational condition.

5.  

Raise flag when occupying or firing according to the local SOP.

6.  

Check ammunition to ensure it is correct type and quantity.

7.  

Ensure range personnel are in proper uniform and the equipment is in position.

8.  

Receive firing units.

9.  

Conduct safety checks on weapons.

10.  

Check for clean, fully operational weapons.

11.  

Conduct safety briefing (to include administrative personnel on range).

12.  

Organize personnel into firing orders (keep unit integrity if possible).

13.  

Request permission to commence firing from range control.

B.   CONDUCT OF FIRING:

1.  

Are communications to range control satisfactory?

2.  

Commands from tower clear and concise?

3.  

Range areas policed?

4.  

Ammunition accountability maintained?

5.  

Master score sheet updated?

6.  

Personnel accountability maintained?

7.  

Vehicles parked in appropriate areas?

8.  

Air guard on duty and alert?

9.  

Personnel in proper uniform?

10.  

Earplugs in use?

11.  

Troops responding properly to commands?

12.  

On-the-spot corrections being made when troops use poor techniques or fail to hit the target?

13.  

Conservation of ammunition enforced?

14.  

Weapons cleared before they are taken from the firing line?

15.  

Personnel checked for brass or ammunition before they leave the range?

16.  

Anyone standing around not involved in training or support?

Section VIII. CLOSING OF RANGE

1.  

Close down range according to the local SOP.

2.  

Remove all equipment and ammunition from range.

3.  

Police range.

4.  

Re-paste and resurface targets as required by range instructions.

5.  

Perform other maintenance tasks as required by local SOP.

6.  

Request a range inspector from range control when ready to be cleared.

7.  

Submit after-action report to headquarters.

8.  

Report any noted safety hazards to proper authorities.

Section IX. KNOWN DISTANCE RANGE

A.   PERSONNEL: In addition to those identified in Section 4.

1.  

NCOIC of pit detail.

2.  

Assistant safety officer for pit area.

B.   EQUIPMENT: In addition to equipment identified in Section 4.

1.  

Sound set for pit area.

2.  

Positive communication from the firing line to the pit area.

3.  

Pasters.

4.  

Glue and brushes for resurfacing targets.

5.  

Lubricant for target frames.

6.  

Proper targets mounted in target frames.

7.  

Briefing on how to operate a KD range.

8.  

Procedure for marking targets.

9.  

Procedure for pit safety.



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