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Military

FM 3-21.91 (FM 7-91)

FIELD MANUAL

HEADQUARTERS

NO. 3-21.91 DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY
  WASHINGTON, DC, 26 November 2002


TACTICAL EMPLOYMENT OF ANTIARMOR
PLATOONS AND COMPANIES

CONTENTS

COVER

PREFACE

CHAPTER 1.   INRODUCTION

 

1-1.   Antiarmor Doctrine

 

1-2.   Organization and Characteristics

 

1-3.   Fundamentals of Antiarmor Unit Employment

 

1-4.   Capabilities and Limitations

 

1-5.   Enemy Antiarmor Countermeasures

CHAPTER 2.   BATTLE COMMAND AND TROOP-LEADING PROCEDURES

Section I.

Command and Control

 

2-1.   Definition of Command and Control

 

2-2.   Concept of Command and Control

 

2-3.   Leadership

 

2-4.   Fundamentals of Command and Control

 

2-5.   Command and Control Responsibilities

 

2-6.   Combat Orders

  

Section II.

Troop-Leading Procedures

 

2-7.   Application of Troop-Leading Procedures

 

2-8.   Receive the Mission

 

2-9.   Issue a Warning Order

 

2-10.   Make a Tentative Plan

 

2-11.   Initiate Movement

 

2-12.   Conduct Reconnaissance

 

2-13.   Complete the Plan

 

2-14.   Issue the OPORD

 

2-15.   Supervise and or Refine

CHAPTER 3.   MOVEMENT

 

3-1.   Movement Fundamentals

 

3-2.   Movement Formations

 

3-3.   Movement Techniques

CHAPTER 4.   OFFENSIVE OPERATIONS

Section I.

General Planning Considerations

 

4-1.   Purpose of Characteristics of the Offense the Offense

 

4-2.   Consideration of Selected Battlefield Operating Systems

 

4-3.   Sequence of Offensive Operations

 

4-4.   Forms of Maneuver

  

Section II.

Maneuver

 

4-6.   Base-of-Fire Force

 

4-7.   Bounding Force

  

Section III.

Actions on Contact

 

4-8.   Developing Actions on Contact

 

4-9.   Time Requirements for Actions on Contact

 

4-10.   The Four Steps of Actions on Contact

  

Section IV.

Types of Offensive Operations

 

4-11.   Attack Characteristics

 

4-12.   Hasty and Deliberate Attacks

 

4-13.   Attack Options

 

4-14.   Movement to Contact

 

4-15.   Exploitation

 

4-16.   Pursuit

CHAPTER 5.   DEFENSIVE OPERATIONS

Section I.

General Planning Considerations

 

5-1.   Purpose of the Defense

 

5-2.   Characteristics of the Defense

  

Section II.

Sequence of the Defense

 

5-3.   Reconnaissance and Security Operations, and Enemy Preparatory Fires

 

5-4.   Occupation and Preparation

 

5-5.   Approach of the Enemy Main Attack

 

5-6.   Enemy Assault

 

5-7.   Counterattack

 

5-8.   Consolidation and Reorganization

  

Section III.

BOS Planning Considerations

 

5-9.   Maneuver

 

5-10.   Fire Support

 

5-11.   Air Defense

 

5-12.   Mobility, Countermobility, and Survivability

 

5-13.   Combat Service Support

  

Section IV.

Preparation and Integration

 

5-14.   Defensive Techniques

 

5-15.   Other Defensive Employment Options

 

5-16.   Engagement Area Development

 

5-17.   Priority of Work

 

5-18.   Sector Sketches

 

5-19.   Adjacent Unit Coordination

CHAPTER 6.   URBAN OPERATIONS

Section I.

General Planning Considerations

 

6-1.   Employment Considerations for Company-Size Combined-Arms Teams

 

6-2.   Employment of Antiarmor Vehicles

  

Section II.

Offense

 

6-3.   General Offensive Considerations

 

6-4.   METT-TC Factors

 

6-5.   Battle Command

 

6-6.   Movement

 

6-7.   Isolate an Urban Objective

 

6-8.   Attack a Block or Group of Buildings

 

6-9.   Consolidation and Reorganization

  

Section III.

Defense

 

6-10.   METT-TC Factors

 

6-11.   Command and Control

 

6-12.   Hasty Defense

 

6-13.   Company Defense of a Village

 

6-14.   Defense of a Block or Group of Buildings

 

6-15.   Defense of Key Terrain

CHAPTER 7.   TACTICAL ENABLING OPERATIONS

Section I.

Reconnaissance

 

7-1.   Reconnaissance Planning

 

7-2.   Reconnaissance Execution

 

7-3.   Reconnaissance during Operations

 

7-4.   Forms of Reconnaissance

  

Section II.

Security Operations

 

7-5.   Forms of Security Operations

 

7-6.   Planning Considerations

 

7-7.   Screen

 

7-8.   Guard

 

7-9.   Local Security

  

Section III.

Linkup

 

7-10.   Linkup Situations

 

7-11.   Linkup Planning

 

7-12.   Steps of the Linkup Operation

  

Section IV.

Passage of Lines

 

7-13.   Planning Considerations

 

7-14.   Reconnaissance Coordination

 

7-15.   Forward Passage of Lines

 

7-16.   Rearward Passage of Lines

CHAPTER 8.   STABILITY OPERATIONS

Section I.

Principles of Stability Operations

 

8-1.   Objective

 

8-2.   Unity of Effort

 

8-3.   Security

 

8-4.   Restraint

 

8-5.   Perseverance

 

8-6.   Legitimacy

  

Section II.

Types of Stability Operations

 

8-7.   Peace Operations

 

8-8.   Foreign Internal Defense

 

8-9.   Security Assistance

 

8-10.   Humanitarian and Civic Assistance

 

8-11.   Support to Insurgencies

 

8-12.   Support to Counterdrug Operations

 

8-13.   Combating Terrorism

 

8-14.   Noncombatant Evacuation Operations

 

8-15.   Arms Control

 

8-16.   Show of Force Operations

  

Section III.

Planning Considerations

 

8-17.   Rules of Engagement

 

8-18.   Rules of Interaction

 

8-19.   Force Protection

 

8-20.   Task Organization

 

8-21.   CSS Considerations

 

8-22.   Media Considerations

 

8-23.   Operations with Outside Agencies

  

Section IV.

Company Tasks

 

8-24.   Establish and Occupy a Lodgment Area

 

8-25.   Negotiations

 

8-26.   Monitor Compliance with an Agreement

 

8-27.   Establish Observation Posts

 

8-28.   Establish Checkpoints

 

8-29.   Conduct Patrol Operations

 

8-30.   Conduct Convoy Escort

 

8-31.   Open and Secure Routes

 

8-32.   Conduct Reserve Operations

CHAPTER 9.   SUPPORT OPERATIONS

Section I.

Types of Support Operations

 

9-1.   Domestic Support Operations

 

9-2.   Foreign Humanitarian Assistance

 

9-3.   Categories of Support Operations

  

Section II.

Considerations for Support Operations

 

9-4.   Provide Essential Support to the Largest Number of People

 

9-5.   Coordinate Actions with Other Agencies

 

9-6.   Establish Measures of Effectiveness

 

9-7.   Handover to Civilian Agencies as soon as Feasible

 

9-8.   Transition to Combat

  

Section III.

Phases of Support Operations

 

9-9.   Response Phase

 

9-10.   Recovery Phase

 

9-11.   Restoration Phase

CHAPTER 10.   COMBAT SUPPORT

Section I.

Command and Support Relationships

 

10-1.   Command Relationships

 

10-2.   Support Relationships

  

Section II.

Fire Support

 

10-3.   Fire Support Considerations

 

10-4.   Fire Support Planning

 

10-5.   Maneuver Commander's Intent

 

10-6.   Planning Process

 

10-7.   Targets

 

10-8.   Final Protective Fires

 

10-9.   Special Munitions

 

10-10.   Observer Positions

 

10-11.   Rehearsal and Execution

 

10-12.   Communications

 

10-13.   Indirect Fires in Close Support

 

10-14.   Fire Support Team

 

10-15.   Close Air Support

 

10-16.   Attack Helicopters

  

Section III.

Intelligence

 

10-17.   Intelligence Assets

 

10-18.   Intelligence Considerations

  

Section IV.

Maneuver Support

 

10-19.   Engineers

 

10-20.   Mobility

 

10-21.   Countermobility

 

10-22.   Survivability

 

10-23.   NBC Support

  

Section V.

Air Defense Artillery

 

10-24.   Systems, Organization, and Capabilities

 

10-25.   Employment of Air Defense Systems

 

10-26.   Weapons Control Status

 

10-27.   Early Warning Procedures

 

10-28.   Reaction Procedures

  

Section VI.

Combat Support in The Stryker brigade combat team

 

10-29.   SBCT

 

10-30.   Infantry Battalion

CHAPTER 11.   COMBAT SERVICE SUPORT OPERATIONS

Section I.

Airborne, Air Assault, and Light Infantry Battalion CSS

 

11-1.   Development of the CSS Plan

 

11-2.   General Guidelines

 

11-3.   Responsibilities

  

Section II.

Trains

 

11-4.   Battalion Combat Trains

 

11-5.   Battalion Field Trains

 

11-6.   Company Trains

 

11-7.   Trains Security

 

11-8.   Communications

  

Section III.

Resupply Operations

 

11-9.   Classes of Supply

 

11-10.   Routine Resupply

 

11-11.   Emergency Resupply

 

11-12.   Prestock Operations

 

11-13.   Antiarmor Company Resupply Requirements

  

Section IV.

Maintenance Operations

 

11-14.   Requirements

 

11-15.   Company Role in Maintenance Operations

 

11-16.   Destruction

  

Section V.

Health Service Support

 

11-17.   Health and Hygiene

 

11-18.   Soldiers Wounded in Action

 

11-19.   Soldiers Killed in Action

 

11-20.   Casualty Evacuation

  

Section VI.

Reorganization and Weapons Replacement

 

11-21.   Replacement and Cross-Leveling of Personnel

 

11-22.   Personnel Replacement Procedures

 

11-23.   Replacement and Salvaging of Equipment

 

11-24.   Weapon System Replacement Operations

  

Section VII.

Combat Service Support in the SBCT

 

11-25.   SBCT Support Methods

 

11-26.   Fixing the Force

 

11-27.   Arming the Force

 

11-28.   Moving the Force

 

11-29.   Sustaining the Force

 

11-30.   Manning the Force

 

11-31.   Responsibility of Company Personnel


APPENDIX A.

WEAPON REFERENCE DATA

APPENDIX B.

RISK MANAGEMENT AND FRATRICIDE AVOIDANCE

APPENDIX C.

DIRECT FIRE PLANNING AND CONTROL

APPENDIX D.

FIRING POSITIONS

APPENDIX E.

TOW EMPLOYMENT IN RESTRICTIVE TERRAIN
   
  GLOSSARY
  REFERENCES
  AUTHENTICATION

DISTRIBUTION RESTRICTION: Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited.



*This publication supersedes FM 7-91, 30 September 1987.



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