Military

Chapter 1
PERSONNEL READINESS MANAGEMENT

This chapter describes the mission, proponency, and support principles of the personnel readiness management system. It also describes the initial focus requirements, doctrinal requirements and standards of support, unit and staff responsibilities, and information requirements.

MISSION

The mission of the personnel readiness management system is to distribute soldiers and Army civilians to subordinate commands based on documented manpower requirements or authorizations and the commander's priorities.

Personnel readiness describes a state of wartime preparedness. Personnel readiness management is a process for achieving and maintaining that state. The process involves analyzing personnel strength data to determine current combat capabilities and project future requirements. It starts with the comparison of an organization's personnel strength against its requirements or authorizations and ends with a personnel readiness assessment and allocation decision.

PROPONENCY

The functional proponent for personnel readiness management is HQDA ODCSPER. The following regulations provide policy and procedural guidance for the personnel readiness management system: AR 600-200, Enlisted Personnel Management System, AR 614-100, Officer Assignment Policies, Details, and Transfers, AR 614-200, Selection of Enlisted Soldiers for Training and Assignment, AR 600-8-6 Personnel Accounting and Strength Reporting, AR 690-11, Civilian Personnel Mobilization Planning and Management.

DOCTRINAL REQUIREMENTS AND STANDARDS OF SUPPORT

Readiness managers continuously collect, correlate, and analyze critical personnel strength information to develop a vision of future requirements. From this assessment they make recommendations to commanders on various courses of action. Critical information includes the latest known personnel strength including such factors as recent casualties, recent replacement allocations, soldiers and Army civilians returning to duty from hospitals, and projected replacement gains and casualty losses.

Theater PERSCOM's readiness managers allocate replacement soldiers to corps and echelons above corps (EAC) units. The theater Army DCSOPS' operations section establishes priority of fill and relays that information to the theater Army DCSPER or senior personnel officer. The theater PERSCOM manages the distribution process, which must take no longer than 24 hours from receipt of the intransit replacement report from USTA PERSCOM.

Corps and EAC readiness managers allocate replacements to divisions, nondivisional units, separate brigades, and major subordinate units. They report their decisions to the theater PERSCOM replacement directorate (RD) or senior replacement element which coordinates replacement flow with the replacement battalion.

The RD also coordinates any desired change in the aerial port of debarkation (APOD) consistent with the tactical situation and the principle of forward delivery. Following approval from the theater J1/J4, the RD relays APOD changes to USTA PERSCOM.

The Army component commander develops as part of the deliberate planning process, an operations plan (OPLAN) shelf requisition to support these requirements.

The peacetime replacement system requires the Army force component commander to submit personnel requisitions to include civilians in advance of requirements. At OPLAN execution, the system delivers filler and casualty replacements to the theater to bring units to combat - required strength and ensure replacements are available as casualties occur. PERSCOM maintains a copy of the preestablished theater shelf requisitions and performs annual maintenance. USTA PERSCOM maintenance includes a review for consistency with personnel policy and MOS/AOC structure changes.

The filler shelf requisitions reflect the number of soldiers by MOS/AOC and grade needed to bring the theater units to wartime-required strength.

The casualty shelf requisitions reflect the number of expected casualties (killed in action, wounded in action, missing in action, non-battle injuries) by MOS/AOC/rank and by time window. Medical planning models and the casualty estimation tables in FM 101-10-1, Volume 2, Staff Officer's Field Manual, form the basis for developing the casualty shelf requisition, which covers replacement requirements over the first 90 to 120 days of conflict.

The Army component commander prepares to transition to the normal requisitioning system based on actual casualty experience.

The theater PERSCOM must develop casualty shelf requisitions for each OPLAN approved by the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff.

Upon execution of an OPLAN, if there is no current or existing casualty requisition to support an approved OPLAN, the theater PERSCOM may request USTA PERSCOM assistance in the development of a shelf requisition.

A theater OPLAN may dictate prepositioning of combat arms/combat support replacement personnel at theater level for immediate distribution as casualties occur. The number of prepositioned replacements will not normally exceed the first ten days of the casualty shelf requisition.

PRINCIPLES OF SUPPORT

The personnel readiness management system is based on individual replacements as the norm. The DCSOPS makes decisions regarding unit replacements regardless of size. Officials in the operations channels determine squad, crew, and team requirements.

PERSONNEL REQUIREMENTS REPORTING

The personnel readiness management system depends on accurate and complete information. Therefore, personnel readiness managers must quickly establish a reporting system within the theater of operations. The following reports are the standard: personnel summary, personnel requirements report, and task force summary. These reports are described in Chapter 2.

Personnel readiness managers use various standard and command-unique reports from the Standard Installation/Division Personnel System (SIDPERS) (including SIDPERS 3.0 and earlier versions). Under early versions of SIDPERS, the deployment process will disrupt the systems producing these reports by requiring individual updates. Therefore, personnel readiness managers must plan for and train in using standard reports that units generate in a deployed environment. They must also plan the integration of deployed unit and sustaining base reports to maintain overall unit requirements.

PERSONNEL READINESS REQUIREMENTS

During the early deployment stages, personnel readiness requirements generally fall into the following categories: initial readiness; designated replacements, critical and special requirements and casualty replacements.

Initial Readiness

Department of the Army will announce acceptable personnel readiness standards for deploying units. Personnel readiness managers must report to USTA PERSCOM any requirements they cannot satisfy through cross-leveling at the parent installation/mobilization station. Current authorized strength will serve as the basis for personnel readiness management unless the HQDA DCSOPS directs a change.

Designated Replacements

Replacements will continue to arrive at the home station for some time after their designated units have deployed. The home station will process and deploy these soldiers to their units in the theater of operations.

Critical Requirements

Although personnel readiness managers will have brought deploying units to a designated readiness level, some critical personnel requirements may remain after the units arrive in the theater of operations. Unit commanders must report these requirements through channels to USTA PERSCOM.

Special Requirements

Commanders will recognize special requirements beyond their required/authorized strength. Assets are cross-leveled at each echelon and requirements are forwarded to the next higher level. DCSOPS channels validate these requirements before the personnel system fills them.

Contingency Casualty Replacements

The predetermined shelf requisition serves as the basis for sending replacements for anticipated casualties. However, current contingency planning is not bound by a well-defined threat or set of assumptions. Contingency plans without time phased force deployment lists (TPFDL) are becoming the primary planning documents. Therefore, USTA PERSCOM, with assistance from the Army component commander, estimates casualty replacement requirements from the deployed force structure and casualty estimates based on the planned operation. The standard for most casualty replacements is individual soldiers; however, it is possible that squad, crews, or teams will be required. Operational planners will determine requirements while personnel readiness managers plan, support, and pass information to replacement operations.

REQUIREMENTS IDENTIFICATION

Since various sources can report personnel requirements, it is essential that the personnel readiness system identify each requirement with a control number. Total Officer Personnel Management Information System/Enlisted Distribution and Assignment System/Army Civilian Personnel System (TOPMIS/EDAS/ACPERS) will support this requirement; therefore, establishing connection between those systems and the theater personnel management center (PMC) is critical.

If requirements exist before establishing a connection, the theater PMC must arrange a requisition numbering system with USTA PERSCOM. Orders publishing authorities must record these requisition numbers on replacement soldiers' orders to provide an audit trail through the replacement system.

RECONSTITUTION

Reconstitution is an action planned and implemented by a commander to restore units to a desired level of combat effectiveness commensurate with mission requirements and available resources. FM 100-9, Reconstitution, provides further guidance. Reconstitution transcends normal day-to-day sustainment actions but uses existing systems and units to do so. No resources exist solely to perform reconstitution.

Personnel readiness management is a critical factor in the reconstitution process. PMC managers at all levels must understand the concepts of reconstitution and plan to support commanders in their efforts to sustain combat power.

Commanders have two reconstitution options: reorganization and regeneration. The commander can execute them separately but most often will execute them sequentially. It depends on the current and anticipated situation, command priorities, resources, and time available. The reconstitution mission also includes an assessment element.

Assessment

Assessment measures a unit's capability to perform its mission. It occurs in two phases. The unit commander conducts the first phase. He continually assesses his unit before, during, and after operations. If he determines it is no longer mission-capable even after reorganization he notifies his commander. Higher headquarters either changes the mission of the unit to match its degraded capability or removes it from combat.

External elements may also have to assess the unit after it disengages. This is the second phase. These elements do a more thorough evaluation to determine regeneration needs. They also consider the resources available.

Reorganization

Reorganization is action to shift resources within a degraded unit to increase its combat effectiveness. Commanders of all types of units at each echelon conduct it. They reorganize before considering regeneration.

Reorganization may include the following measures:

  • Cross-levelling equipment and personnel.
  • Matching operational weapons systems with crews.
  • Forming composite units (joining two or more units with high attrition rates to form a single mission-capable unit).

Regeneration

Regeneration is the rebuilding of a unit. It requires large-scale replacement of personnel, equipment, and supplies. These units may then require further reorganization. Regeneration may involve reestablishing or replacing the chain of command. It also involves conducting mission-essential training to get the regenerated unit to standard with its new personnel and equipment.

Because of the intensive nature of regeneration, it occurs at a regeneration site after the unit disengages. It also requires help from higher echelons. Since regeneration typically requires large quantities of personnel and equipment, commanders carefully balance these needs against others in the command.

Personnel Readiness Manager's Role

The personnel readiness manager's role in the reconstitution process has many facets. Responsibilities include the following:

  • Evaluate strength levels and determine replacement personnel availability. This includes identifying personnel with needed secondary or additional occupational specialties and developing personnel replacement plans to support all reconstitution options.
  • Coordinate replacement requirements based on equipment/weapon system availability.
  • Distribute personnel replacements in accordance with the commander's priorities.
  • Anticipate and coordinate transportation requirements for replacement personnel.
  • Coordinate the processing of soldiers and civilians returning to duty from medical facilities with medical and logistics units.
  • Advise commanders on the impact of reclassification actions, or assignments without regard to MOS, in response to reconstitution needs.
  • Anticipate increased requirements for battlefield promotions and decorations.
  • Update personnel requirements data in the personnel data base continuously, and coordinate with higher headquarters for replacement allocation.

Special Unit Requirements

It maybe more difficult to reorganize or regenerate combat support (CS) and combat service support (CSS) units than combat units. This is due to requirements for replacement personnel in low-density MOSs normally associated with CS and CSS units. Therefore, reconstituting units of these types requires more detailed planning, more extensive cross-training, earlier selection of units for use in reconstitution, and increased reliance on individual replacement.

INITIAL FOCUS

During the early deployment stages, personnel readiness managers must focus their efforts in the following critical areas: establishing new requisition accounts in the TOPMIS/EDAS/ACPERS to reflect the deployed force configuration and establishing a theater personnel requirements reporting system.

TOPMIS/EDAS/ACPERS are systems that United States Total Army (USTA) PERSCOM uses to manage personnel readiness. These systems require adjustment at USTA PERSCOM to support revised organizational relationships and recognize new requisitioning agencies. Personnel readiness managers at theater and corps level must coordinate with forward - deployed elements of USTA PERSCOM to gain access to their TOPMIS/EDAS/ACPERS accounts from the area of operations. This connection provides the means to manage the requisitioning system for the deployed force.

BATTLEFIELD FLOW

During the deployment phase of a contingency operation, the personnel readiness management system will operate on two levels. One level will operate within the sustaining base. It will focus on improving unit readiness before, then during deployment. The other level will begin to operate within the deployed force. It will focus on assessing deployed unit readiness and identifying critical personnel requirements.

The personnel readiness management system will gradually transition during the deployment phase from the garrison requisitioning mode to a deployed force requirements reporting mode.

The lead corps AG or theater PERSCOM will establish the personnel readiness management system for the theater through coordination with USTA PERSCOM forward-deployed personnel. Units that deploy before the lead corps AG continue to report to their parent units at the sustaining base. These early deploying units will rely on replacements from their sustaining base until the lead corps AG establishes the theater replacement management system.

The personnel requirements reporting system flows from the lowest level through each PMC. The PMCs consolidate reports at their command levels up to theater level. The theater AG selects and intensively manages certain grade and skill requirements as soon as the personnel readiness management system becomes established.

RESPONSIBILITIES

The personnel management directorates of PERSCOM and the personnel management centers (PMCs) at each echelon of command from theater to battalion are responsible for personnel readiness management. A model of the personnel readiness management network is at Figure 1-1.

The following units/agencies have the responsibility to plan, establish, and operate the personnel readiness management system.

BATTALION

Battalion personnel readiness management responsibilities include the following critical tasks:

  • Collect and correlate critical personnel readiness information.
  • Maintain the personnel status of critical combat teams.
  • Coordinate with the battalion S4 to determine combat equipment availability, and synchronize replacement flow.
  • Advise the commander on current personnel readiness status and forecast personnel status to support intelligence/logistics preparation of the battlefield.
  • Recommend replacement priorities.
  • Assign individual, squad, crew, or team replacements in accordance with the commander's priorities.
  • Report critical personnel requirements for individual soldiers and teams to the division PMC through the brigade S1.
  • Plan the personnel portion of reconstitution operations.

BRIGADE

Brigade S1 personnel readiness responsibilities include the following critical tasks:

  • Collect and correlate critical personnel readiness information.
  • Maintain critical combat team status.
  • Coordinate with the S4 to determine combat equipment availability, and synchronize replacement flow.
  • Advise the commander on current and projected personnel readiness status to support intelligence/logistics preparation of the battlefield.
  • Recommend replacement priorities.
  • Assign individual, squad, crew, or team replacements in accordance with the commander's priorities.
  • Report critical personnel requirements to the division PMC.
  • Plan and coordinate the personnel portion of reconstitution operations.

DIVISION

The personnel readiness branch of the division includes the replacement section and the PASR section. This branch is responsible for the following critical personnel readiness management tasks:

  • Manage the division's personnel readiness network.
  • Manage the personnel portion of reconstitution operations.
  • Collect, consolidate, analyze, and report hasty personnel strength information to the corps PMC.
  • Maintain information on the status of critical combat teams.
  • Reconcile differences between manual personnel information and the command data base.
  • Advise the commander on current and projected personnel readiness status to support intelligence/logistics preparation of the battlefield.
  • Advise the commander on combat leader personnel status.
  • Conduct readiness analysis, assess combat capabilities, and identify personnel readiness requirements by skill and rank.
  • Predict personnel requirements based on current strength levels, projected gains, estimated losses, and the projected number of soldiers and Army civilians returning to duty from medical facilities.
  • Identify critical skills, and formulate recommendations for shortage resolution or compensation.
  • Assess new equipment and weapons systems' impact on personnel requirements.
  • Report personnel requirements to the corps AG.
  • Manage the division's force by skill and rank.
  • Recommend replacement allocation and priorities of fill to the division commander/division G3.
  • Allocate individual, squad, crew, or team replacements in accordance with the division commander's priorities.
  • Provide assignment fill plans to the replacement section.
  • Direct intra-division reassignments to meet operational requirements.

CORPS

The corps personnel readiness managers' responsibilities are described in the following paragraphs.

The lead corps AG responsibilities during early deployment stages are the following:

  • Establish an electronic link to TOPMIS/EDAS ACPERS with assistance from forward-deployed elements of USTA PERSCOM.
  • Establish the personnel requirements reporting system.
  • Include a personnel readiness manager from the theater PERSCOM with an early element of the corps PMC.
  • Advise the commander on current and projected personnel status to support intelligence/logistics preparation of the battlefield.

The personnel readiness management branch performs the specific critical tasks essential for operating the personnel readiness and replacement management systems. The following are their personnel readiness management critical tasks:

  • Manage the corps personnel readiness network.
  • Coordinate the personnel portion of reconstitution operations.
  • Collect, consolidate, analyze, and report unit strengths.
  • Maintain the status of critical combat teams.
  • Manage the corps hasty personnel strength reporting system.
  • Receive and consolidate personnel strength reports.
  • Compare manual personnel strength information against the corps data base.
  • Direct reconciliation whenever discrepancies exist between manual personnel information and the corps data base.
  • Advise the commander on corps personnel strength.
  • Conduct readiness analysis, assess combat capabilities, and identify personnel requirements by skill and rank.
  • Predict personnel requirements based on operating strength, required strength, estimated losses, projected replacements, and estimated number of soldiers and Army civilians returning to duty from medical facilities.
  • Identify and analyze critical skill inventories, and formulate recommendations for resolution or compensation.
  • Identify and assess the personnel readiness impact of new equipment and weapon systems, and take action to satisfy personnel requirements.
  • Manage the personnel portion of corps combat power by skill and rank.
  • Recommend replacement priorities through the corps G1.
  • Provide replacement priorities for the divisions to the theater PMC.
  • Allocate individual, squad, crew, team, and return-to-duty corps replacements according to the corps commander's priorities.
  • Provide assignment fill plans to the DS replacement company for separate brigades and corps major subordinate unit (less divisions).
  • Direct intra-corps reassignments to meet operational requirements.

THEATER PERSCOM

Responsibilities during early deployment stages are the following:

  • Deploy a personnel readiness manager with an early increment of the lead corps PMC.
  • Prepare to assume the theater personnel readiness management mission from the lead corps AG.
  • Plan theater-level personnel support to synchronize it with operational objectives.

The theater replacement directorate manages the personnel readiness and replacement management systems and performs the following specific personnel readiness management critical tasks:

  • Manage the theater personnel readiness network.
  • Manage theater strength reports.
  • Advise the theater Army commander on theater personnel readiness (through the DCSPER).
  • Obtain and maintain readiness information on units deploying into the theater.
  • Collect, record, analyze, and report unit strengths to determine personnel requirements and priorities.
  • Prepare and maintain preestablished shelf requisitions.
  • Conduct readiness analyses, assess combat capabilities, and identify personnel readiness requirements by skill and rank.
  • Predict personnel requirements based on assigned strength, operating strength, required strength, estimated losses, and the projected number of soldiers and Army civilians returning to duty from medical facilities.
  • Identify and analyze critical skill inventories, and formulate recommendations for resolution or compensation.
  • Determine personnel requirements that new equipment fielding may generate.
  • Recommend replacement priorities to the theater Army DCSOPS through the DCSPER.
  • Execute approved replacement priorities.
  • Develop theater distribution plans to allocate replacements.
  • Allocate personnel replacements according to EAC/corps established priorities.
  • Provide distribution fill plans to the GS replacement battalion.
  • Allocate replacements to corps/TAACOM and theater major subordinate units.
  • Manage the theater force by skill and rank.
  • Direct intra-theater reassignments to meet operational requirements.

INSTALLATIONS

Sustaining base installation responsibilities during early deployment stages are the following:

  • Cross-level personnel where possible to bring deploying units to the required personnel readiness levels.
  • Report to USTA PERSCOM and its MACOM those personnel readiness requirements they cannot fill.

MACOM

Responsibilities during early deployment stages are the following:

  • Respond to personnel readiness requirements for deploying units.
  • Assist USTA PERSCOM in realigning requisition authorities based on the deploying force structure.

USTA PERSCOM

Responsibilities during early deployment stages are the following:

  • Respond to personnel readiness requirements for deploying units during the deployment process.
  • Realign requisition authorities within TOPMIS/EDAS/ACPERS to recognize the deployed force composition.
  • Ensure that assignment instructions for replacement personnel contain a requisition number reference to the specific requirement.
  • Deploy an element, and assist the lead corps AG to establish an electronic link to TOPMIS/EDAS/ACPERS.

INFORMATION REQUIREMENTS

The personnel readiness management process requires strength information from two sources: strength reports from the command chain and detailed strength information from the command data base. Strength reports include the personnel status report and personnel requirements report.

Personnel management centers at each echelon of command require assured electronic access to command data bases to obtain real-time, detailed information on the personnel readiness status of subordinate elements. This information also reflects real-time organizational alignments to account for task force organization. Chapter 27 describes this requirement in further detail. Organizational strength information includes both operating and accountable strength.

Assured electronic communications supports immediate data base update at all command echelons. This standard is essential for effective personnel readiness management.

Once mobilized, personnel readiness managers at all levels in all components (Active Army including civilians, USAR, ARNG) will use SIDPERS for personnel information management.



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