Find a Security Clearance Job!

Military

Iran Press TV

Drone strikes threaten global security: UN report

Iran Press TV

Fri Oct 18, 2013 1:45AM GMT

A new UN report warns that the use of armed drones threatens global security and encourages more states to acquire unmanned weapons.

The report, which has been submitted to UN General Assembly by Christof Heyns -- the organization's special rapporteur on extrajudicial killings, summary or arbitrary executions -- called for states that operate armed drones to be more transparent and publicly disclose how they use them, The Guardian reported on Thursday.

'The expansive use of armed drones by the first states to acquire them, if not challenged, can do structural damage to the cornerstones of international security and set precedents that undermine the protection of life across the globe in the longer term,' the report said.

'The use of drones by states to exercise essentially a global policing function to counter potential threats presents a danger to the protection of life, because the tools of domestic policing (such as capture) are not available, and the more permissive targeting framework of the laws of war is often used instead,' it pointed out.

The report also called for international laws to be respected rather than ignored.

'The view that mere past involvement in planning attacks is sufficient to render an individual targetable, even where there is no evidence of a specific and immediate attack, distorts the requirements established in international human rights law,' stated the report.

Countries cannot consent 'to the violation of their obligations under international humanitarian law or international human rights law,' it added.

Heyns noted that 'drones come from the sky but leave the heavy footprint of war on the communities they target."

'The claims that drones are more precise in targeting cannot be accepted uncritically, not least because terms such as 'terrorist' or 'militant' are sometimes used to describe people who are in truth protected civilians," he said.

The report is the first of two major papers on drone strikes due to be debated at the UN General Assembly on October25. The second, by Ben Emmerson, special rapporteur on counter-terrorism, will be published next week.

Although no state is identified in the report, the comments are clearly directed at the legal problems raised by the US program of aerial attacks against what it describes as militants in other countries.

Emmerson said that drone strikes have killed far more civilians than US officials have publicly acknowledged.

He said on Thursday that at least 400 in Pakistan and as many as 58 in Yemen have been killed by the CIA drone strikes, and censured the US for failing to aid the investigation by disclosing its own figures.

The report was welcomed by the London-based human rights group Reprieve, which represents several civilian victims of drone strikes in Pakistan and Yemen.

'This report rightly states that the US's secretive drone war is a danger not only to innocent civilians on the ground but also to international security as a whole.

'The CIA's campaign must be brought out of the shadows: we need to see real accountability for the hundreds of civilians who have been killed - and justice for their relatives. Among Reprieve's clients are young Pakistani children who saw their grandmother killed in front of them - the CIA must not be allowed to continue to smear these people as 'terrorists',' said its legal director, Kat Craig.

Washington uses assassination drones in several countries, claiming that they target "terrorists". According to witnesses, however, the attacks have mostly led to massive civilian casualties.

MN/HN/MHB



NEWSLETTER
Join the GlobalSecurity.org mailing list