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                                  73 177                                 
                            107 th Congress                             
                                 Report                                 
                                                                             
                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES                        
                              1st Session                               
                                107 102                                 
       MAKING SUPPLEMENTAL APPROPRIATIONS FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING SEPTEMBER 
                       30, 2001, AND FOR OTHER PURPOSES                        
  June 19, 2001.--Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the   
 State of the Union and ordered to be printed                            
  Mr. Young of Florida, from the Committee on Appropriations, submitted  
 the following                                                           
                                  REPORT                                 
                              together with                              
                     DISSENTING AND ADDITIONAL VIEWS                     
                         [To accompany H.R. 2216]                        
      The Committee on Appropriations submits the following report in      
   explanation of the accompanying bill making supplemental appropriations 
   for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2001, and for other purposes.  
                                      BILL HIGHLIGHTS                             
      The bill recommended by the Committee provides a net discretionary   
   supplemental appropriation of $6,544,580,000 for fiscal year 2001, and  
   is consistent with the provisions for fiscal year 2001 supplemental     
   appropriations of H. Con. Res. 83, the fiscal year 2002 budget          
   resolution. Total spending provided in the bill is $7,481,283,000       
   including $6,750,352,000 for national security requirements,            
   $2,168,931,000 for nondefense requirements, and $1,438,000,000 in       
   offsetting reductions. The bill includes $6,455,380,000 for the         
   Department of Defense to cover increased operating costs, as well as to 
   cover requirements for pay, support, training and quality of life for   
   military personnel. It also includes $288,472,000 for defense-related   
   requirements at the Department of Energy. The bill includes $389,200,000
   for disaster-related needs for the Corps of Engineers, Department of the
   Interior, and the Forest Service. Additionally, the Low Income Home     
   Energy Assistance Program would be supplemented by $300,000,000; the    
   Education for the Disadvantaged account would be supplemented by        
   $161,000,000, and the Coast Guard would receive $92,000,000 for         
   operating expenses. The bill also includes $115,776,000 million for the 
   implementation of the recently enacted tax rebate. Additional mandatory 
   appropriations totalling $936,413,000 are included for veterans'        
   benefits.                                                               
                                          TITLE I                                 
                                  NATIONAL SECURITY MATTERS                       
                                         CHAPTER 1                                
                              DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE--MILITARY                     
                                     MILITARY PERSONNEL                           
      The supplemental request included $515,000,000 for functions funded  
   in title I, Military Personnel, of the Department of Defense            
   Appropriations Act. The Committee recommends $515,000,000. The following
   table summarizes the requested amounts and the Committee                
   recommendations.                                                        
                           [In thousands of dollars]                           
Program                                Request      Committee  recommendation    
Legislated Pay Entitlements            $116,000     $116,000                     
Basic Allowance for Housing Survey     210,000      210,000                      
Subsistence                            28,000       28,000                       
Reserve Training                       42,000       48,500                       
Officer Pay Table Reform               28,000       28,000                       
Permanent Change of Station Moves      58,000       58,000                       
Recruiting and Retention               33,000       26,500                       
                                  OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE                       
      The supplemental request included $2,885,700,000 for functions funded
   in title II, Operation and Maintenance, of the Department of Defense    
   Appropriations Act. The Committee recommends $2,936,200,000. The        
   following table summarizes the requested amounts and the Committee      
   recommendations.                                                        
                                    [In thousands of dollars]                                   
Program                                                     Request      Committee recommendation    
Flying Hours                                                $970,000     $970,000                    
Focused Relief                                              36,000       36,000                      
Base Operations                                             414,000      407,000                     
Second Destination Transportation                           62,000       50,000                      
Force Protection                                            33,000       33,000                      
Contractor Logistics Support                                63,000       63,000                      
Joint Exercises                                             11,000       11,000                      
EHIME MARU                                                  36,000       36,000                      
Utilities                                                   465,000      463,100                     
California Electrical Demand Reduction                      24,500       41,500                      
Real Property Maintenance                                   186,000      144,300                     
Aircraft Depot Maintenance                                  276,000      276,000                     
Ship Depot Maintenance                                      200,000      200,000                     
Classified Programs                                         65,200       96,400                      
Recruiting and Advertising                                  0            25,000                      
U.S.S. COLE (funded in General Provisions)                  44,000       44,000                      
Natural Disaster Damages (funded in General Provisions)     0            39,900                      
                    California Energy Demand Reduction                   
      The Committee recommends $45,700,000 for implementation of the       
   Department of Defense's plan to reduce electricity demand in California 
   and the Western United States, an increase of $17,000,000 above the     
   request. These initiatives are intended to reduce electricity demand by 
   ten percent this year and a total of fifteen percent by summer 2002. The
   Committee believes strongly that the Department must place greater      
   emphasis on utilizing available service resources and technologies that 
   can ultimately eliminate service dependence on the public power grids in
   this region. The Committee encourages the Department of Defense to      
   allocate a significant portion of this funding increase to focus on this
   area.                                                                   
      The additional funds, to remain available through fiscal year 2002,  
   are allocated as follows:                                               
                                                       
     Operation and Maintenance, Army            $6,800,000  
     Operation and Maintenance, Navy             7,200,000  
     Operation and Maintenance, Air Force        3,000,000  
      The Committee directs that in distributing funds for the Energy      
   Demand Reduction program, the Department should prioritize projects     
   based upon available data to include increases in installation utility  
   costs, the rate of savings in energy demand the project will produce,   
   and the availability of service resources to complete the project. The  
   Committee further directs the Secretary of Defense to submit a report to
   the congressional defense committees within 45 days of enactment of this
   Act that describes the complete criteria to be used and the proposed    
   projects for distribution of these funds.                               
                        Recruiting and Advertising                       
      The Committee recommends a total of $25,000,000 to fund the Army's   
   advertising campaign sufficiently through the end of the fiscal year.   
   The Committee is aware of the Army's advertising efforts to focus on    
   certain audiences, including Hispanics, and directs that no less than   
   $5,000,000 of the funds provided be used to further increase existing   
   production efforts directed toward Hispanic recruits.                   
                         Natural Disaster Damages                        
      The supplemental request includes $12,500,000 to repair damages      
   caused by natural disasters. Responding to Committee requests for       
   information, the military services provided details on the full extent  
   of natural disaster damages, including severe wind damage in the        
   northwestern United States in December 2000 and January 2001, the       
   February 2001 earthquake in the northwestern United States, and numerous
   other occurrences of severe damage throughout the United States. In     
   order to meet these needs, the Committee has provided $27,400,000 in    
   additional funding, for a total of $39,900,000. The Committee has       
   realigned those funds in the request and these additional amounts, and  
   consolidated funding for these activities in a general provision in the 
   Committee bill.                                                         
                            Other Adjustments                            
       Base Operations. --The Committee recommends a total of $407,000,000 
   for Base Operations. Within the amount recommended the Committee        
   recommends $300,000,000 for Army; $83,000,000 for Navy; $7,000,000 for  
   Army Reserve; $7,000,000 for Navy Reserve; and $10,000,000 for Army     
   National Guard. Funding for MH 47E unit beddown is deferred based on    
   consideration of other high priority requirements. The Department is    
   encouraged to seek restoration of Host Nation Support.                  
       Real Property Maintenance. --The Committee recommends a total of    
   $144,300,000 for Real Property Maintenance. Within the amount           
   recommended, the Committee recommends $91,000,000 for Army; $31,500,000 
   for Navy; $6,800,000 for Air Force; and $15,000,000 for Army National   
   Guard. Funding for F 22 beddown is deferred.                            
       Second Destination Transportation. --After review of the many high  
   priority requirements presented by the Department, the Committee        
   recommends a total of $50,000,000 for Second Destination Transportation,
   a reduction of $12,000,000 to the supplemental request.                 
               USE OF BIOFUELS BY THE DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE              
      The Committee commends the Department of Defense for its efforts to  
   maximize the use of ethanol, biodiesel and other agricultural-based     
   fuels and lubricants, and urges the Department to continue the effort.  
                                         PROCUREMENT                              
      The supplemental request included $550,700,000 for functions funded  
   in title III, Procurement, of the Department of Defense Appropriations  
   Act. The Committee recommends $488,700,000. The following table         
   summarizes the requested amounts and the Committee recommendations.     
                            [In thousands of dollars]                           
Program                                    Request     Committee  recommendation     
Training Munitions                         $73,000     $73,000                       
C 17 Overhead Costs                        49,000      49,000                        
Ship Cost Growth                           222,000     222,000                       
California Electrical Demand Reduction     4,200       4,200                         
Classified Programs                        202,500     125,000                       
Global Positioning System NUDET            0           15,500                        
                            Training Munitions                           
      The supplemental request includes $73,000,000 for various training   
   munitions. The Committee recommendation includes this amount. The Air   
   Force has informed the Committee that there is a near term shortfall of 
   $452,000,000 in training munitions and a $2,000,000,000 shortfall over  
   the Future Years Defense Plan. The Committee is dismayed to learn that  
   these shortfalls are a result of a decade of neglect in Air Force       
   budgets. The Committee further notes that the munitions procured with   
   the supplemental funds will not be available for two years. This is     
   clearly a requirement that must be addressed in an ongoing and          
   deliberate manner as part of the regular annual appropriation process   
   rather than supplemental appropriations. Accordingly, the Committee     
   directs the Air Force to budget adequately for training munitions in    
   future budget submissions.                                              
                    Global Positioning System (Space)                    
      The supplemental request includes $15,500,000 in a classified line   
   for acquisition of a nuclear detonation detection (NUDET) sensor for    
   installation on the GPS satellite. The Air Force has informed the       
   Committee that installation of this sensor on the GPS satellite is an   
   unclassified fact. The Committee believes that funding this sensor in a 
   classified line separately from the host GPS satellite unnecessarily    
   complicates budget formulation, justification, and execution.           
   Accordingly, the Committee recommendation includes a transfer of funding
   for this effort to the GPS satellite procurement line-item. The         
   Committee directs that future budget requests for GPS NUDET be included 
   as part of the GPS satellite procurement line-item. The Committee       
   believes that this direction is not only preferable from a budgetary    
   standpoint, but also fully consistent with DoD's intent to expand the   
   Air Force's role and responsibilities in space.                         
                         RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, TEST AND EVALUATION               
      The supplemental request included $440,500,000 for functions funded  
   in title IV, Research, Development, Test and Evaluation, of the         
   Department of Defense Appropriations Act. The Committee recommends      
   $525,600,000. The following table summarizes the requested amounts and  
   the Committee recommendations.                                          
                           [In thousands of dollars]                           
Program                         Request     Committee recommendation    
ISR Enhancements                0           $5,000                      
Airborne Laser                  $153,000    153,000                     
Launch Vehicle Demonstration    48,000      48,000                      
Global Hawk                     25,000      17,000                      
Miniature Munitions             20,000      13,000                      
ISR Battle Management           0           5,000                       
Joint Experimentation           15,000      15,000                      
V 22 Aircraft                   80,000      120,000                     
Naval Fires Network             0           5,000                       
Classified Programs             99,500      144,600                     
                                   v 22                                  
      The supplemental request proposes a series of funding adjustments to 
   the V 22 program, intended to begin implementation of recommendations   
   made by the Panel to Review the V 22 Program (the so-called ``Blue      
   Ribbon Panel'') to hold V 22 production rates to minimum levels while   
   the program is restructured and restored to operation. To support       
   initial redesign and testing efforts, the supplemental request proposes 
   to increase the fiscal year 2001 budget request for V 22 research and   
   development by $80,000,000. The request also proposes rescissions of    
   fiscal year 2001 V 22 production funding totaling $475,000,000          
   ($235,000,000 from ``Aircraft Procurement, Navy'', and $240,000,000 from
   ``Aircraft Procurement, Air Force''), in keeping with the Department's  
   revised procurement profile.                                            
      The Committee agrees with the thrust of the proposed changes         
   contained in the supplemental budget request. However, in order to      
   enable the Marine Corps to accelerate activities associated with risk   
   reduction, part redesign, and continued operational testing necessary   
   for the V 22 to return to flight status, the Committee recommends       
   $120,000,000 for V 22 research and development, an increase of          
   $40,000,000 over the supplemental request. The Committee has also       
   carefully scrutinized the funding requirements associated with the V 22 
   production program, and has determined that the supplemental request    
   uses overly conservative pricing assumptions by the Defense Department  
   on the remaining V 22 aircraft to be procured with fiscal year 2001     
   funds. Accordingly, the Committee believes the current planned fiscal   
   year 2001 procurement program can be executed at a lower cost, yielding 
   funding which is available to help finance a more accelerated and robust
   V 22 testing and development effort, as well as other urgent needs in   
   this legislation. Therefore, while approving the rescissions of prior   
   year funds proposed in the request, the Committee recommends additional 
   rescissions of $95,000,000 to the ``Aircraft Procurement, Navy''        
   appropriation account and $20,000,000 to the ``Aircraft Procurement, Air
   Force'' account.                                                        
                              AIRBORNE LASER                             
      The supplemental request includes $153,000,000 for the Airborne Laser
   to address program cost growth and to reduce schedule risk for a lethal 
   demonstration against a theater missile planned in 2003. The Committee  
   recommendation includes this amount.                                    
                           SMALL DIAMETER BOMB                           
      The supplemental request includes $20,000,000 for a new program to   
   develop a 250 pound Small Diameter Bomb (SDB). The Committee notes that 
   $12,000,000 was appropriated to initiate this effort in fiscal year     
   2001. The Committee also notes that contract award will likely not occur
   until late fiscal year 2001 or early fiscal year 2002. Given the        
   availability of funds, and the delay in contract award, the Committee   
   recommendation includes $13,000,000 subject to the direction below. Any 
   additional fiscal year 2002 requirements should be addressed as part of 
   the DoD's fiscal year 2002 request.                                     
      Over the past several years, the Committee has supported an advanced 
   technology demonstration of a low cost seeker technology called Direct  
   Attack Munitions Affordable Seeker (DAMASK). DAMASK, developed at Naval 
   Air Warfare Center China Lake, uses a low cost commercial imaging       
   infrared sensor produced for the automobile industry. DAMASK provides a 
   passive, GPS independent, through the weather, lock-on after launch,    
   precision strike capability. In actual flight tests, the seeker has     
   demonstrated accuracy within one meter in a GPS denied environment.     
   DAMASK is estimated to cost $20,000 per seeker, less than half of the   
   amount allocated in the Air Force's SDB seeker estimates.               
      The Committee strongly encourages the Air Force to adopt the DAMASK  
   technology for use in the SDB program. At a minimum, the Committee      
   directs that evaluation of DAMASK technology be included in the SDB     
   Request for Proposal (RFP) and that DAMASK be the standard of comparison
   in terms of cost and performance for all potential SDB seeker           
   candidates.                                                             
      The Committee directs that prior to contract award for SDB, the      
   Secretary of the Air Force submit a report to the congressional defense 
   committees that includes: 1) a determination of whether the DAMASK      
   technology (using an articulated design if required) can be adapted to  
   accommodate the size requirements of the SDB; 2) an evaluation of DAMASK
   as a viable solution to the anti-jam requirements for the SDB; 3) an    
   evaluation of DAMASK for use as an automatic target recognition seeker  
   for mobile targets (assuming a logical technology growth path); 4) a    
   cost and performance comparison between DAMASK and competing seeker     
   proposals; and 5) a comparison of the competing seeker proposals in     
   terms of technology readiness.                                          
                          Joint Experimentation                          
      The supplemental request included $15,000,000 for ``Research,        
   Development, Test and Evaluation, Defense-Wide'', which the Department  
   of Defense then intended to transfer to Joint Experimentation efforts   
   funded in the ``Research, Development, Test and Evaluation, Navy''      
   appropriation. The Committee recommends appropriating the $15,000,000   
   directly to ``Research, Development, Test and Evaluation, Navy'', to    
   avoid the delay.                                                        
        Intelligence, Surveillance, Reconnaissance (ISR) Programs        
      The supplemental request included $25,000,000 for Intelligence,      
   Surveillance, Reconnaissance (ISR) programs, specifically an effort to  
   accelerate the development of the Global Hawk High Altitude Endurance   
   Unmanned Aerial Vehicle. The Committee recommends $32,000,000 for       
   overall ISR efforts, an increase of $7,000,000, as outlined below.      
       Global Hawk .--The Department requested $25,000,000 to accelerate   
   the development of the Global Hawk High Altitude Endurance Unmanned     
   Aerial Vehicle. The Committee recommends $17,000,000 for initiation of  
   the plan presented by the Air Force to accelerate development of the    
   Global Hawk.                                                            
      The Committee is concerned that the Air Force plan reflects a highly 
   ambitious schedule, relying heavily on the rapid development and        
   delivery of a myriad of sensor systems. The Committee believes the Air  
   Force should use up to $5,000,000 of the funds provided to conduct a    
   competitive fly-off demonstration to evaluate existing sensor systems,  
   particularly electro-optical and infrared sensors and synthetic aperture
   radars, that demonstrate potential for achieving the requirement without
   the need for a significant investment in development cost and schedule. 
   This effort could significantly reduce the risk inherent in the current 
   schedule.                                                               
       ISR Networking Enhancements.-- The Army, Navy, and Air Force are    
   initiating programs and conducting joint and service-specific exercises 
   that highlight networking and command and control of ISR assets, time   
   critical strike, and other network centric operations. These efforts,   
   although developed separately, are by necessity joint due to their      
   reliance on a common set of goals, assets, databases, and communication 
   links.                                                                  
      It is clear that central to the ability of each of the Services to   
   identify, track, attack, and assess damage, is the development of       
   methods to link available sensors into a network of shared data to      
   support decision makers at all levels. The Committee notes that funding 
   for many of the fiscal year 2001 networking efforts have been cobbled   
   together from a variety of projects that support related programs, but  
   specific funds for certain requirements have not been fully funded in a 
   budget request. Therefore, the Committee has provided a total of        
   $15,000,000 for the services to enhance and accelerate high priority    
   networking projects. The Committee directs the $15,000,000 be used as   
   follows:                                                                
       For the Army, $5,000,000 for Intelligence, Surveillance,            
   Reconnaissance Enhancements.--$3,000,000 for UAV Radio Network Upgrades 
   to allow radios to be networked beyond the line of sight and $2,000,000 
   for the continued development of the Joint Common Data Base.            
       For the Navy, $5,000,000 for Naval Fires Network (NFN) testing,     
   evaluation, and deployment, an analysis of the requirement to upgrade   
   the tactical dissemination module, and training and long lead           
   requirements for a potential NFN prototype deployment with a CVBG.      
       For the Air Force, $5,000,000 for Intelligence, Surveillance,       
   Reconnaissance Battle Management to initiate a new start program to     
   develop a capability to dynamically command, control and visualize ISR  
   assets and information in the Air Operations Center (AOC).              
      The Committee agrees with the approach that each service is taking.  
   Nevertheless, it is essential that each service Chief monitor their     
   programs to ensure that service solutions are joint in application.     
   Architectures must be built in such a way that interoperability and     
   exchange of information is encouraged and not hindered.                 
                     OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (C3I)           
      Recent actions within the Office of the Assistant Secretary of       
   Defense for Command, Control, Communications and Intelligence (ASD/C3I) 
   indicate that this office has failed in its responsibility to adhere to 
   congressional directives with respect to execution of funding for       
   particular programs, projects, and activities. The Committee believes   
   that these instances show a lack of judgment, questionable management   
   practices, and what appears to be at best an indifference for Congress' 
   role in the establishment of defense spending priorities. Such practices
   not only undermine the appropriations process, but also weaken the      
   confidence given to ASD/C3I with respect to conducting its overall      
   responsibilities within the Department of Defense.                      
      The Committee recognizes that ASD/C3I is an important organization   
   with far reaching oversight and management of important Department of   
   Defense programs. The Committee believes that such authority must be    
   combined with a more responsive management structure that is capable not
   only of effectively managing its programs, but also ensuring that the   
   intent of Congress is implemented in a timely manner. The Committee     
   expects that the Secretary of Defense will ensure that any future       
   Assistant Secretary of Defense for ASD/C3I will take steps to correct   
   these types of actions and will address the issues identified by the    
   Committee.                                                              
                               REVOLVING AND MANAGEMENT FUNDS                     
                               DEFENSE WORKING CAPITAL FUNDS                      
      The supplemental request included $178,400,000 for functions funded  
   in title V, Revolving and Management Funds, of the Department of Defense
   Appropriations Act. The Committee recommends $178,400,000. The following
   table summarizes the requested amounts and the Committee                
   recommendations.                                                        
                           [In thousands of dollars]                           
Program       Request      Committee  recommendation     
Utilities     $178,400     $178,400                      
                            OTHER DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE PROGRAMS                  
      The supplemental request included $1,453,400,000 for functions funded
   in title VI, Other Department of Defense Programs, of the Department of 
   Defense Appropriations Act. The Committee recommends $1,655,300,000. The
   following table summarizes the requested amounts and the Committee      
   recommendations.                                                        
                                             [In thousands of dollars]                                             
Program                                                                    Request        Committee  recommendation     
Defense Health Program                                                     $1,453,400     $1,653,400                    
Drug Interdiction and Counter-Drug Activities, Defense (for utilities)     0              1,900                         
                    DEFENSE HEALTH PROGRAM COST GROWTH                   
      The Committee notes that in 12 of the past 16 years, the Congress has
   been compelled to act either by providing new appropriations or prior   
   approval reprogrammings to ensure sufficient funding for the Defense    
   Health Program. Including the amount recommended in this bill, the      
   Congress has provided a total of over $6,500,000,000 above amounts      
   requested by the Department of Defense for this program since fiscal    
   year 1986.                                                              
      One reason for these shortfalls is the need to fully fund the cost of
   contractually provided health care. To fund such shortfalls, the        
   Committee recommends $786,300,000, as requested by the administration,  
   for costs associated with the TRICARE global settlement, for price      
   adjustments in execution of fiscal year 2001, for requirements that     
   could not be met by the Department of Defense medical treatment         
   facilities, and for certain pharmacy costs. With respect to global      
   settlement, the Committee harbors concerns that this amount does not    
   reflect all valid contractor claims since July 2000. The Committee is   
   aware that numerous valid claims have yet to be adjudicated and that new
   claims have been filed by TRICARE contractors since the beginning of    
   calendar year 2001. The Committee therefore directs the Secretary of    
   Defense to submit a report to the congressional defense committees,     
   prior to conference on the fiscal year 2001 Supplemental Appropriations 
   bill, that provides estimates of the outstanding liability for global   
   settlement and other change order requirements not previously identified
   or estimated that exceed the funding provided in this bill.             
      In addition, the Committee is aware that the Department of Defense   
   suffers from chronic funding shortfalls due to the inaccuracy of current
   DoD budgeting methods. Current practices have clearly failed to keep    
   pace with increases in medical care costs brought about by advances in  
   the technology of providing medical care, and by substantial increases  
   in pharmacy costs. An example of the discrepancy between budgeting      
   methods and reality is reflected in pharmacy costs, for which the       
   Department regularly budgets for cost growth of 4 5 percent per year    
   while actual cost growth since 1996 has averaged nearly 12 percent      
   annually. Therefore, the Committee directs the Secretary of Defense to  
   submit a report to the congressional defense committees, concurrent with
   submission of the fiscal year 2002 budget request, which details        
   measures included in the fiscal year 2002 budget request to improve     
   budgeting methods for medical care in the fiscal year 2002 request and  
   for subsequent budget requests.                                         
  Military Treatment Facility Optimization and Advance Medical Practices 
      The Committee has provided an additional $200,000,000 above the      
   budget request as an initial increment to begin the process of reversing
   the erosion in the ability of the direct military health care system to 
   provide the highest standards of care to service personnel, their       
   families, and to Medicare-eligible military retirees. The inability of  
   the Department to accurately forecast its TRICARE contractor costs,     
   combined with high cost growth in the commercial medical sector,        
   congressional action to expand health benefits to military retirees, and
   a poorly structured base contract for TRICARE service providers has     
   resulted in an explosion in TRICARE costs that has exceeded forecast    
   levels by tens of billions of dollars over the past several years.      
   Besides putting strains on the DoD budget as a whole, the direct care   
   system of the military medical departments has been especially hard hit 
   as their budgets have been consistently raided to pay for TRICARE cost  
   overruns. For instance, this year the fourth quarter operating budgets  
   for the Army, Navy and Air Force direct care systems have all been used 
   to pay legitimate but unbudgeted TRICARE contractor claims. Without the 
   replenishment of over $1.4 billion in this bill, all three of the       
   services' direct care systems would be forced to shut down in July or   
   August.                                                                 
      This severe and persistent funding instability for the direct care   
   system has been highly disruptive to orderly administration and has had 
   an insidious ``penny-wise, pound-foolish'' effect on the entire system  
   over time. It has prevented military managers from making sound         
   investments to increase the longer-term efficiency of their system and  
   to maintain the highest quality standards of care. The Surgeons General 
   have repeatedly testified that this continued neglect of the direct care
   system soon will lead to a decrease in quality of patient care, a       
   significant disruption in the normal delivery of health care services,  
   declining morale among the medical workforce, and more difficulty in    
   recruiting top medical talent.                                          
      The Committee also notes that sound investments in the direct care   
   system can save significant amounts of money. For instance, the Air     
   Force Surgeon General testified that the lack of funding for MTF        
   operating room supplies has caused his staff to transfer in-house       
   appendectomy patients to TRICARE contractors at a total cost of $6,000  
   to $7,000 per procedure instead of $300 at an MTF. The Committee is     
   aware that the Surgeons General have documented hundreds of individual  
   MTF investments that will not only improve the quality of care, but     
   allow them to provide care cheaper than if it were outsourced to TRICARE
   contractors. These ``optimization'' projects make good business sense.  
      In addition, the Committee is concerned that the TRICARE financial   
   crisis has sapped the ability of the military direct care system to keep
   abreast of and implement the latest advances in medical practices. Every
   year, it is estimated that the military health system needs around $100 
   million a year to implement newly developed practices/procedures such as
   laser refractive eye surgery, liquid based cytology, positron emission  
   tomography, or non-invasive colonoscopy. It is these same funds that are
   held in reserve by the Department until the very end of the fiscal year 
   to cover TRICARE shortfalls, and are often reduced or eliminated. The   
   Committee believes this is a counter-productive budgetary practice.     
      The Committee has therefore provided $200,000,000 to begin the       
   process of reversing the disinvestments in the military's direct care   
   system. Of this amount, $150,000,000 is provided to expand the services'
   MTF optimization efforts and $50,000,000 is provided to finance         
   necessary advances in medical practices that have been deferred to date.
   Optimization projects may include increased staffing, minor facility    
   repairs and maintenance, expansion of services, equipment modernization,
   pharmacy upgrades, or other activities that will improve health care    
   service and/or reduce overall cost to the government. The Committee bill
   carries language requiring that business case models be prepared for    
   these projects to show that they will be ``self-financing'' within at   
   least three years of project initiation, in the sense that they save    
   more overall cost to the government (to include TRICARE contractor cost)
   than is invested under this account. The bill language also gives the   
   ability to the Surgeons General to undertake other activities that may  
   not technically meet the cost savings criteria if they deem it necessary
   to meet a critical health care deficiency that threatens health care    
   outcomes.                                                               
      The Committee directs each Surgeon General to report to the          
   congressional defense committees by September 15, 2001 on what projects 
   or activities are to be funded with these funds (including the cost and 
   location of each), the expected overall return on investment of each    
   project, and a description of the need/benefits for each project. The   
   Committee also expects and has included language requiring that each    
   project or activity funded under this section be continued and          
   adequately financed in out year budget plans (the so-called POM         
   process). The bill requires the Secretary of Defense to so certify      
   before funds can be released.                                           
                   DRUG INTERDICTION AND COUNTER-DRUG ACTIVITIES, DEFENSE         
      The Congress identified $5,000,000 in the fiscal year 2000 Department
   of Defense Appropriations Act to provide logistical and demilitarization
   support for the transfer of three excess A 10 aircraft to the Department
   of State in support of its Latin American drug eradication efforts. This
   action has yet to be finalized. In view of the increased threat         
   environment, the Committee recommends that the Secretary of Defense     
   renew consultations with the Department of State on this matter and     
   proceed with the transfer of these aircraft.                            
                                      RELATED AGENCIES                            
                             NATIONAL DRUG INTELLIGENCE CENTER                    
      The Congress funded the National Drug Intelligence Center (NDIC) at a
   fiscal year 2001 baseline level of $34,100,000 to implement changes in  
   operations and responsibilities specified by the General Counterdrug    
   Intelligence Plan (GCIP). The GCIP established the NDIC as the principal
   center for domestic strategic counterdrug analysis in support of        
   policymakers and resource planners, and mandated the establishment or   
   expansion of key technological and analytical assets. The Committee     
   expects the intelligence community to ensure that this new baseline is  
   fully reflected in the fiscal year 2002 and out year budgets.           
                                    CLASSIFIED PROGRAMS                           
      The Committee's recommendations regarding classified programs are    
   summarized in a classified annex accompanying this report.              
                              GENERAL PROVISIONS--THIS CHAPTER                    
      The Committee bill amends a general provision requested in the       
   supplemental request concerning the availability of funds provided in   
   this chapter.                                                           
      The Committee bill includes a general provision requested in the     
   supplemental request concerning funds for intelligence related programs.
      The Committee bill amends a general provision requested in the       
   supplemental request which provides $44,000,000 of additional funds for 
   the repair of the U.S.S. COLE.                                          
      The Committee bill includes a general provision which rescinds       
   $834,000,000 from funds provided in previously enacted Defense          
   Appropriations Acts. The accounts and specific programs recommended for 
   rescission are as follows:                                              
Rescissions                                                             
    2000 Appropriations:                                                    
                                         $3,000,000
    2001 Appropriations:                                                    
                                         81,000,000
                                         330,000,000
                                         5,000,000
                                         260,000,000
                                         65,000,000
                                         85,000,000
                                         5,000,000
      The Committee bill includes a general provision which provides       
   funding to repair facilities damaged by natural disasters.              
      The Committee bill includes a general provision extending the        
   authorities provided in section 816 of the National Defense             
   Authorization Act of 1995, as amended, through January 31, 2002.        
                                         CHAPTER 2                                
                                    DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY                          
                          NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION                
                            WEAPONS ACTIVITIES                           
      The Committee recommendation includes $140,000,000 for Weapons       
   Activities as proposed by the Administration. However, the Committee    
   recommendation modifies the distribution of the program funding.        
       Directed stockpile work .--An additional $54,000,000 has been       
   provided for directed stockpile work to be allocated as follows:        
   $18,900,000 for stockpile maintenance; $4,000,000 for stockpile         
   evaluation; and $31,100,000 for stockpile research and development,     
   including $24,000,000 for W 88 pit certification activities.            
       Campaigns .--An additional $9,000,000 has been provided for         
   campaigns to be allocated as follows: $1,800,000 for secondary          
   readiness; $1,600,000 for non-nuclear readiness; $1,600,000 for high    
   explosives manufacturing and weapons assembly/disassembly readiness; and
   $4,000,000 for pit manufacturing readiness.                             
       Readiness in technical base and facilities .--An additional         
   $47,000,000 has been provided for readiness in technical base and       
   facilities to be allocated as follows: $23,000,000 for operations of    
   facilities; $9,500,000 for program readiness; $4,500,000 for material   
   recycle and recovery; $8,800,000 for containers; and $1,200,000 for     
   storage.                                                                
      The recommendation also adjusts funding for construction projects    
   provided in the fiscal year 2001 appropriations bill to more accurately 
   reflect the use of the funds. Funding of $9,500,000 provided in Project 
   01 D 103, Project Engineering and Design (PE&D), has been transferred to
   Project 01 D 108, Microsystems and Engineering Science Applications     
   (MESA) Complex, at Sandia National Laboratories. Funding provided in    
   fiscal year 2001 for this project was for infrastructure upgrades which 
   should have been provided in the MESA construction line item, not PE&D. 
      Funding of $3,689,000 is provided for Project 01 D 107, Atlas        
   Relocation and Operations, at the Nevada Test Site. This reflects the   
   transfer of $3,689,000 from Project 01 D 103, PE&D, to relocate the     
   Atlas pulsed power facility to the Nevada Test Site by the end of fiscal
   year 2003.                                                              
       Facilities and infrastructure .--The Committee has provided         
   $30,000,000 to establish a new program, Facilities and Infrastructure,  
   to address the serious shortfall in maintenance and repairs throughout  
   the nuclear weapons complex. This funding should be used to reduce the  
   backlog of maintenance and repairs and dispose of excess facilities.    
                              OTHER DEFENSE RELATED ACTIVITIES                    
                   DEFENSE ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION AND WASTE MANAGEMENT         
      The Committee recommendation includes $100,000,000 for Defense       
   Environmental Restoration and Waste Management as proposed by the       
   Administration. Additional funding of $31,700,000 is provided for the   
   Savannah River Site for high-level waste activities and work in the F&H 
   areas. Additional funding of $18,300,000 is provided for the Hanford    
   site in Richland, Washington, for spent nuclear fuel activities, work on
   the Plutonium Finishing Plant, and F-reactor interim storage activities.
   For the Office of River Protection in Richland, an additional           
   $10,000,000 is provided for tank farm operations and $25,000,000 to     
   support the Hanford vitrification plant. Additional funding of          
   $7,000,000 has been provided to purchase TRUPACTS shipping containers in
   support of operations at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in New Mexico; 
   $5,000,000 to restore funding for high level waste disposal activities  
   at Idaho; and $3,000,000 for groundwater contamination activities at the
   Pantex plant in Texas.                                                  
                            DEFENSE FACILITIES CLOSURE PROJECTS                   
      The Committee recommendation includes $21,000,000 for Defense        
   Facilities Closure Projects as proposed by the Administration.          
   Additional funding of $20,000,000 has been provided for the Fernald,    
   Ohio, project, and $1,000,000 for the Miamisburg, Ohio, project.        
                       DEFENSE ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT PRIVATIZATION             
      The Committee recommendation includes $27,472,000 for Defense        
   Environmental Management Privatization, a reduction of $2,128,000 from  
   the Administration's request of $29,600,000. These additional funds will
   be used to meet funding commitments for the Advanced Mixed Waste        
   Treatment Facility in support of legally enforceable deadlines for      
   shipping waste out of Idaho.                                            
                                         CHAPTER 3                                
                                   MILITARY CONSTRUCTION                          
                                MILITARY CONSTRUCTION, ARMY                       
      The Committee recommends appropriating $67,400,000 above the         
   President's request. Of this amount, $55,100,000 is to upgrade utility  
   systems in Korea that are in serious states of disrepair, and $6,900,000
   is to renovate and upgrade substandard and environmentally unsafe       
   vehicle maintenance facilities in Germany. The following projects are   
   included:                                                               
Location/account/installation    Project title                             Cost  
Korea:                                                                           
 Army:                                                                            
Camp Humphreys                   Electrical Upgrade                 $10,200,000  
Camp Humphreys                   Sewer Upgrade                       12,000,000  
Camp Hovey                       Sewer Upgrade                       13,400,000  
Camp Casey                       Sewer Upgrade Phase 2                8,000,000  
Camp Casey                       Electrical Upgrade                   4,000,000  
Camp Stanley                     Electrical Upgrade                   7,500,000  
Yongsan Army Garrison            Underground Fuel Tanks               1,600,000  
                                                                  -------------  
Subtotal, Korea                                                      56,700,000  
                                                                  =============  
Japan:                                                                           
 Army:                                                                            
Camp Schwab                      Special Forces Training Range         3,800,00  
                                                                  -------------  
Subtotal, Japan                                                       3,800,000  
                                                                  =============  
                                                                  =============  
Germany:                                                                         
 Army:                                                                            
Darmstadt                        Vehicle Maintenance Shop             2,500,000  
Kaiserslautern                   Vehicle Maintenance Shop             2,900,000  
Bamberg                          Vehicle Maintenance Facility         1,500,000  
                                                                  -------------  
Subtotal, Germany                                                     6,900,000  
                                                                  =============  
Total                                                                67,400,000  
      In 1999 and 2000, the Command of United States Forces in Korea (USFK)
   suffered 295 electrical power and 467 water supply outages from a       
   decaying infrastructure no longer capable of standing up to daily use   
   and severe weather, much less hostile action. Magnifying the problem is 
   the increasing need for sophisticated information technology systems    
   that are incompatible with existing infrastructure. To begin managing   
   these problems, the Committee has included funds to replace the         
   infrastructure with upgraded systems. Not only will this improve the    
   lives and working conditions of troops stationed in Korea, it will      
   strengthen the position of the Command to negotiate a land partnership  
   agreement with the government of the Republic of Korea.                 
      As a result, of the deteriorating infrastructive, troops do not have 
   internet access readily available. Nevertheless, a recent survey cited  
   phone and internet access as the top concern of service people stationed
   in Korea. The Committee encourages the Commander of United States Forces
   in Korea (USFK) to explore this matter and to make recommendations to   
   the Committee for improving its phone and internet services.            
      The Committee is also concerned that being stationed in Korea is     
   considered to be an assignment where soldiers suffer the greatest loss  
   of pay. For example, a Korea assignment is a 1-year unaccompanied       
   hardship tour similar to a 6-month unaccompanied hardship tour in the   
   Balkans. Yet soldiers serving in the Balkans are provided tax relief (no
   federal taxes) and a Basic Allowance Subsistence (separate rations) of  
   approximately $237 per month. Soldiers serving in Korea, however, do not
   receive similar benefits. Given the equally hazardous conditions in     
   Korea and the Balkans, this disparity seems unfair.                     
      Additionally, $3,800,000 is provided for the Special Forces Special  
   Operations Training Facility at Camp Schwab in Okinawa, Japan. A new    
   training facility is needed to replace the existing facility that has   
   been condemned. $1,600,000 is provided for the replacement of           
   underground fuel storage tanks in Korea.                                
      Finally, vehicle maintenance facilities in Germany are in need of    
   substantial renovation in order to ensure safe working conditions for   
   troops and to meet stringent environmental regulations. Consequently,   
   the Committee recommends $6,900,000 to renovate and upgrade three such  
   facilities.                                                             
                                MILITARY CONSTRUCTION, NAVY                       
      The Committee recommends providing $10,500,000, above the President's
   request, of which $9,400,000 is for the construction of an Emergent     
   Repair Facility in Guam for submarines and ships in transit in the South
   Pacific. Additionally, $1,100,000 is provided for a 3rd Marine          
   Expeditionary Force Training Facility at Camp Schwab in Okinawa, Japan. 
   The existing training facility is incapable of containing ammunition    
   rounds and does not meet environment standards.                         
                              MILITARY CONSTRUCTION, AIR FORCE                    
      The Committee recommends $8,000,000 for Military Construction, Air   
   Force, instead of $18,000,000 as proposed by the President. The         
   appropriation is for heat, ventilation, and fire protection systems in  
   hardened aircraft shelters at the Kunsan Air Base in Kunsan, Korea.     
                                    FAMILY HOUSING, ARMY                          
      The Committee recommends $29,480,000 for the Family Housing, Army,   
   instead of $27,200,000 as requested by the President. Of the amount     
   provided, $2,280,000 is to convert and renovate 102 substandard low-rise
   apartments in Hannam Village, Seoul, Korea. The remaining amounts are   
   necessary to pay for the increased cost of utilities due to rate        
   increases for natural gas and electricity.                              
                           FAMILY HOUSING, NAVY AND MARINE CORPS                  
      The Committee recommends providing $20,300,000 for the Family        
   Housing, Navy and Marine Corps, as requested by the President. This     
   amount is necessary to pay for the increased cost of utilities due to   
   rate increases for natural gas and electricity.                         
                                 FAMILY HOUSING, AIR FORCE                        
      The Committee recommends providing $18,000,000 for the Family        
   Housing, Air Force, as requested by the President. This amount is       
   necessary to pay for the increased cost of utilities due to rate        
   increases for natural gas and electricity.                              
                           BASE REALIGNMENT AND CLOSURE, PART IV                  
      The Committee recommends $9,000,000 for the Base Realignment and     
   Closure, Part IV, as requested by the President. This appropriation     
   enables the Air Force to fulfill contractual obligations incurred for   
   the environmental clean-up of McClellan Air Force Base.                 
                              GENERAL PROVISIONS--THIS CHAPTER                    
   The bill contains three provisions:                                     
      Section 1301 modifies the existing $77,500,000 cap to allow for      
   unanticipated increases in construction costs and related contingency   
   allowances at the Arvin Cadet Physical Development Center at the United 
   States Military Academy in New York. These increases, however, cannot   
   exceed the authorized amount of the project of $85,000,000. The         
   Secretary of the Army is directed to submit a report to the             
   congressional defense committees on the current cost estimates for the  
   project 15 days prior to expending funds on the final phase of          
   construction.                                                           
      Section 1302 clarifies that amounts provided to the Department of    
   Defense under each of the headings in this Chapter are available for the
   same time period as the amounts appropriated under each such heading in 
   Public Law 106 246.                                                     
      Section 1303 rescinds $64,000,000 from funds provided in previous    
   Military Construction Appropriations Acts.                              
                                          TITLE II                                
                              OTHER SUPPLEMENTAL APPROPRIATIONS                   
                                         CHAPTER 1                                
                              GENERAL PROVISION--THIS CHAPTER                     
      Section 2101. The Committee recommends a technical correction related
   to the Rural Community Advancement Program. The Committee does not      
   recommend additional appropriations for the Animal and Plant Health     
   Inspection Service and for the Klamath Basin, as requested. It is the   
   view of the Committee that these funding requirements can be met by     
   administrative action through existing powers and authorities of the    
   Commodity Credit Corporation. The Committee urges and directs the       
   Department to take such action promptly in order to meet these needs    
   more expeditiously than would be possible by waiting for enacted        
   supplemental appropriations.                                            
      With regard to the budget request for $20,000,000 for financial      
   assistance to eligible producers in the Klamath Basin, the Committee    
   directs the Department of Agriculture to submit an apportionment request
   forthwith to the Office of Management and Budget. This request shall    
   cover the release of not less than $20,000,000 from available funds of  
   the Commodity Credit Corporation for the purpose of providing assistance
   to producers, as determined by the Secretary of Agriculture. A copy of  
   this appointment request shall be submitted to the Committees on        
   Appropriations of the House and the Senate within three days of its     
   submission to the Office of Management and Budget. Further, the         
   Secretary of Agriculture is directed to keep the Committees fully       
   advised to the status and disposition of this apportionment request.    
                                         CHAPTER 2                                
                                    DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA                          
      The Committee recommends an additional $95,677,000 for District of   
   Columbia activities during fiscal year 2001 consisting of $250,000 by   
   transfer from Federal funds previously appropriated, $93,276,000 from   
   local funds and $2,151,000 from enterprise funds. The District          
   government's request totals $94,677,000 to be financed completely from  
   local funds and was transmitted to the President by the Mayor on May 22,
   2001. This supplemental request is necessitated by budget pressures of  
   $190,000,000 which District officials are addressing and at this time   
   have been able to resolve over 51 percent through internal adjustments  
   and the use of reserves. The balance is due primarily to increased      
   enrollment in the Medicaid program, the need to invest in support       
   services for children, youth, and their families, anticipated costs of  
   collective bargaining agreements, and unforeseen increases in natural   
   gas prices.                                                             
      The supplemental recommended by the Committee is funded entirely with
   local funds and a transfer of previously appropriated Federal funds.    
   There is no new Federal money included. District officials and the      
   control board certified $109,500,000 in additional local revenues above 
   the original projections of $3,263,000,000 that were developed in       
   December 1999 to support the fiscal year 2001 budget. The major areas of
   revenue increases are taxes and licenses and permits.                   
                             GOVERNMENTAL DIRECTION AND SUPPORT                   
                          (including rescission)                         
      The Committee recommends a net increase of $5,140,000 within this    
   appropriation title consisting of $5,400,000 to cover the 84 percent    
   increase in the price of natural gas experienced by the District        
   government and a rescission of $250,000 that was appropriated as a      
   Federal payment in Public Law 106 522 on the condition that the         
   Comptroller General assist the District in developing a solicitation for
   the study and design of a system to simplify the administration of      
   personnel policies, including pay policies, for employees of the        
   District government. District officials have stated that they are       
   further along in their procurement effort and would be delayed if they  
   were to comply with the conditions placed on the use of the $250,000. As
   a result the District's Chief Financial Officer requested that the funds
   be rescinded and the District's Personnel Officer has assured the       
   Committee in a letter dated May 2, 2001 that ``they expect to have the  
   deliverables required by the Congress by the end of * * *'' fiscal year 
   2001.                                                                   
                            ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AND REGULATION                   
      The Committee recommends an additional $1,625,000 for two programs   
   under this appropriation title. A total of $1,000,000 is recommended for
   the Office of Business Services and Economic Development for the        
   implementation of the District government's New E-Conomy Transformation 
   Act of 2000 to attract and foster the growth of businesses involved in  
   the development, production, distribution, and sale of Internet-based   
   and other communications technologies. The amount of $625,000 is        
   recommended to fund the city's abatement and condemnation efforts of    
   nuisance properties as required under section 5 513 of the D.C. Code.   
   The Committee has not approved language concerning the transfer of      
   savings resulting from personnel vacancies or language that requires the
   deposit of funds into revolving accounts or the request that funds for  
   the Department of Consumer and Regulatory Affairs not be available until
   certain actions are completed by June 1, 2001. That requirement would   
   have been unenforceable since the date of June 1, 2001 has since passed.
                                 PUBLIC SAFETY AND JUSTICE                        
                          (including rescission)                         
      The Committee recommends a net increase of $8,770,000 for several    
   activities within this appropriation account. A total of $2,800,000 is  
   recommended for the Metropolitan Police Department consisting $800,000  
   to implement the photo radar contract program to photograph the license 
   plates of speeders and $2,000,000 to pay an arbitration award made to   
   the members of the Fraternal Order of Police involving a grievance      
   concerning the curtailing of overtime pay to certain employees. The     
   Committee recommends $5,940,000 for the Fire and Emergency Medical      
   Services Department consisting of $5,540,000 for back payments and      
   accrued interest resulting from delays in implementing programs allowing
   fire fighters to make pre-tax payments for pension and health and life  
   insurance benefits, and $400,000 to cover the remaining costs of placing
   a fifth fire fighter on fire trucks. The Committee also recommends      
   $161,000 for the Child Fatality Review Committee to examine the past    
   events and circumstances leading to or causing the death of a child or  
   youth, a committed ward of child welfare, or person with mental         
   retardation and developmental disabilities. The Committee will operate  
   as a distinct entity within the Chief Medical Examiner's office. The    
   Committee also recommends the rescission of $131,000 for taxicab        
   inspectors. This program is funded under the Public Works appropriation 
   at the same level.                                                      
                                  PUBLIC EDUCATION SYSTEM                         
                      (Including transfer of funds)                      
      The Committee recommends an additional $2,000,000 for the Public     
   Education System consisting of $1,750,000 in local funds and $250,000 by
   transfer of previously appropriated Federal funds. A total of $1,000,000
   is recommended for independent audits of public school enrollment counts
   and residency verification in the D.C. Public Schools and the D.C.      
   Public Charter Schools as required by District statute. The Committee   
   questions why these funds were not included in the regular annual       
   budget, especially since the audit is required by law. The Committee    
   also recommends an additional $1,000,000 for the operation of the Excel 
   Institute Adult Education Program consisting of a transfer of $250,000  
   in Federal funds appropriated in Public Law 106 522 that are matched    
   with $750,000 in local funds. A total of $2,000,000 in local funds was  
   supposedly included by District officials in the District of Columbia   
   Appropriations Act for fiscal year 2001 but upon closer examination     
   there was only $1,000,000 that was included for construction and the    
   acquisition of construction services from the General Services          
   Administration on a reimbursable basis. Rather than rescind the $250,000
   in Federal funds for the pay simplification system as requested by      
   District officials, the Committee has transferred those funds to this   
   appropriation title for the Excel Institute and recommends that those   
   funds be matched with $750,000 in local funds. The Excel Institute is an
   Academic/Auto Technical Training School located in Northwest Washington.
   The Institute offers young men and women in the District the opportunity
   to train for a career, earn a high school equivalency diploma, and      
   obtain an unsubsidized job in the automotive industry. The Committee has
   also approved language that requires any proceeds and interest accruing 
   from the sale of the University of the District of Columbia's radio     
   station WDCU held by the control board in an escrow account be used for 
   the University's Endowment Fund and invested in equity based securities 
   if approved by the District's Chief Financial Officer.                  
                                   HUMAN SUPPORT SERVICES                         
      The Committee recommends an additional $28,000,000 for activities    
   within the Human Support Services appropriation. The Committee          
   recommends $15,000,000 to cover the local share of Medicaid costs due to
   an increase in the number of clients receiving inpatient and specialty  
   hospital services and an increase in enrollments in the managed care    
   program. A total of $4,000,000 is recommended to cover modifications in 
   the funding formula that has resulted in higher Disproportionate Share  
   to Hospitals (DSH) payments for uncompensated care provided to District 
   residents by local hospitals. The Committee recommends $3,000,000 for   
   the District's Disability Compensation Fund to cover medical and        
   compensation costs for an increased caseload, $1,000,000 for the Office 
   of Latino Affairs to provide Latino Community Education grants to 6,000 
   families in the Latino community, and $5,000,000 for the Children       
   Investment Trust to support a non-profit entity referred to as the      
   Children and Youth Investment Trust Corporation. This corporation will  
   coordinate the services provided to youth at the community level and    
   disburse funds to community-based organizations that serve children,    
   youth and their families with services that include early childhood     
   development opportunities, safe and enriching centers for learning in   
   and out of school, and other training, recreational, and educational    
   services. The board of the corporation consists of members appointed by 
   the Mayor and Council as well as four government officials who serve as 
   advisory members of the board.                                          
                                        PUBLIC WORKS                              
      The Committee recommends $131,000 from local funds for the Taxicab   
   Commission for taxicab inspectors. This function was previously         
   performed by the Metropolitan Police Department which had reduced the   
   number of hack inspectors from six to three. The Taxicab Commission is  
   expected to place a higher priority on taxicab enforcement and reducing 
   the number of complaints.                                               
                                   WORKFORCE INVESTMENTS                          
      The Committee recommends an appropriation of $40,500,000 from local  
   funds to fund anticipated compensation increases from current labor     
   negotiations. The District's major bargaining units are renegotiating   
   contracts that expired on September 30, 2000.                           
                                      WILSON BUILDING                             
      The Committee recommends an additional $7,100,000 from local funds to
   make up a shortfall in budgeting by District officials for funds needed 
   for the relocation of various District agencies to the John A. Wilson   
   Building.                                                               
                                       CAPITAL OUTLAY                             
      The Committee recommends approval of the reallocation of $4,850,000  
   from five existing projects that have had no implementation activity    
   since fiscal year 1999 to six projects involving buildings of historical
   significance in the District and the funding of a program manager. The  
   six government buildings selected will be renovated. The dormant        
   projects are: Electrical Modernization-Old Juvenile Court, $2,650,000;  
   Asbestos Abatement-Oak Hill Juvenile Court, $525,000; Condition         
   Assessments, $159,080; Electrical Modernization-Various DC Facilities,  
   $1,000,000; Building Renovations--Old Juvenile Court, $525,000. These   
   dormant projects total $4,859,080. The properties to be renovated are:  
   Recorder of Deeds at 5th and D Street, N.W., $2,000,000; Old Navy       
   Hospital at 921 Pennsylvania Avenue, S.E., $400,000; Tivoli Theater at  
   14th Street and Park Road, N.W., $1,000,000; 10th Precinct Building at  
   750 Park Road, N.W., $450,000; Lamond Recreation Center, $400,000;      
   Riggs-Lasalle Recreation Center at 501 Riggs Road, N.E., $400,000. The  
   reallocation also includes $200,000 for the program manager.            
                                 ENTERPRISE AND OTHER FUNDS                       
                   WATER AND SEWER AUTHORITY AND THE WASHINGTON AQUEDUCT          
      The Committee recommends an additional $2,151,000 from local funds   
   for the Water and Sewer Authority to cover the costs of the Public Space
   Occupancy Permit Rental Fee (``right-of-way'' fee) imposed by the       
   District on WASA and increased costs for compliance activities related  
   to the District's stormwater permit.                                    
                                         CHAPTER 3                                
                                DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE--CIVIL                      
                                   DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY                         
                                 CORPS OF ENGINEERS--CIVIL                        
           FLOOD CONTROL, MISSISSIPPI RIVER AND TRIBUTARIES, ARKANSAS, ILLINOIS,  
            KENTUCKY, LOUISIANA, MISSISSIPPI, MISSOURI, AND TENNESSEE             
      The Committee has provided $18,000,000 for the Mississippi River and 
   Tributaries project for the Corps of Engineers to address emergency     
   needs resulting from severe localized spring flooding and other natural 
   disasters. The funds would be used to address the damages caused by     
   flooding by placing more revetment squares; repairing scours that       
   threaten a pumping station, a public road and tributary levees; and     
   replacing relief wells that threaten the stability of a pumping station.
   Funds would also be used to dredge silted channels, remove drift and    
   repair levee slides. The entire amount is designated by the Congress as 
   an emergency requirement pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A) of the        
   Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985, as amended.  
                             OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE, GENERAL                   
      The Committee has provided $115,500,000 for the Corps of Engineers to
   address emergency needs resulting from recent Midwestern and other      
   floods, ice storms, an earthquake, and other natural disasters. The     
   funds would be used to dredge commercial navigation channels, remove    
   debris, repair damaged revetments and dam embankments, and repair       
   damaged buildings and equipment at Corps of Engineers projects. The     
   Committee has also included language which directs the Corps of         
   Engineers to undertake the project authorized by section 518 of the     
   Water Resources Development Act of 1999. The entire amount is designated
   by the Congress as an emergency requirement pursuant to section         
   251(b)(2)(A) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of
   1985, as amended.                                                       
      Corps of Engineers projects in the Tulsa, Little Rock, and Vicksburg 
   Districts were particularly hard hit by winter ice storms and the funds 
   provided will enable the Corps to make necessary repairs to damaged     
   facilities.                                                             
      Areas of Louisiana, Alabama and Texas received over 30 inches of rain
   over a eight day period as a result of Tropical Storm Allison. The funds
   provided will enable the Corps to address flooding problems, restore    
   appropriate depths of navigable waterways and other damages in the New  
   Orleans, Galveston and Mobile districts.                                
                           FLOOD CONTROL AND COASTAL EMERGENCIES                  
      The Committee has provided $50,000,000, the same as the amount       
   requested by the Administration, for Flood Control and Coastal          
   Emergencies for the repair of eligible Federal and non-Federal          
   facilities damaged by natural disasters. The entire amount is designated
   by the Congress as an emergency requirement pursuant to section         
   251(b)(2)(A) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of
   1985, as amended.                                                       
                                    DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY                          
                                      ENERGY PROGRAMS                             
                            NON-DEFENSE ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT                  
      The Committee recommendation includes $11,950,000 for Non-Defense    
   Environmental Management, an increase of $550,000 over the request of   
   $11,400,000. Additional funding of $10,000,000 is provided to continue  
   cleanup at the Brookhaven National Laboratory in New York, and          
   $1,950,000 is provided to study remediation options at the former Atlas 
   Corporation's uranium mill tailings site near Moab, Utah.               
                       URANIUM FACILITIES MAINTENANCE AND REMEDIATION             
      The Committee recommendation includes $18,000,000 for Uranium        
   Facilities Maintenance and Remediation, to be derived from the Uranium  
   Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund, as proposed by the 
   Administration. Additional funding of $9,000,000 has been provided to   
   support cleanup activities at Paducah, Kentucky, and $9,000,000 has been
   provided to continue decontamination and decommissioning activities at  
   the former gaseous diffusion plant in Oak Ridge, Tennessee.             
                              POWER MARKETING ADMINISTRATIONS                     
           CONSTRUCTION, REHABILITATION, OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE, WESTERN AREA  
                              POWER ADMINISTRATION                                
      The Committee recommendation for the Western Area Power              
   Administration (Western) is $1,578,000 to complete the planning and     
   environmental studies to support the proposed 84-mile, 500-kilovolt     
   transmission line between Los Ban AE6os and Gates (also known as ``Path 
   15'') in California. Path 15 is presently a bottleneck in the           
   transmission of electricity between northern and southern California.   
   The additional funds will allow Western to complete the planning for the
   proposed transmission project, including coordination with potential    
   nonfederal sponsors for the project. Funds are also provided for Western
   to update the environmental impact documentation originally completed in
   1986. These funds are non-reimbursable so that existing Western         
   customers do not have to repay these costs to the Federal government.   
                               GENERAL PROVISION--THIS CHAPTER                    
      The Committee has included bill language to direct the Corps of      
   Engineers to use $500,000 of the funds provided in Public Law 106-377 to
   complete work on the Chickamauga Lock, Tennessee feasibility study.     
                                         CHAPTER 4                                
                                 DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR                       
                                  BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS                        
                                OPERATION OF INDIAN PROGRAMS                      
      The Committee recommends $50,000,000 for operation of Indian         
   programs, as requested by the Administration, to allow for the repayment
   by the Bureau of Indian Affairs to the land acquisition accounts of the 
   Bureau of Land Management, the United States Fish and Wildlife Service, 
   and the National Park Service. The entire amount is designated by the   
   Congress as an emergency requirement pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A) of
   the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985, as       
   amended.                                                                
      In May 2001, the Secretary of the Interior used her transfer         
   authority in Section 102 of the FY 2001 Interior and Related Agencies   
   Appropriations Act, Public Law 106 291, to provide a total of           
   $41,000,000 to prevent the shutdown of the San Carlos Irrigation Project
   (SCIP) electric power operations in Arizona. The transfers are expected 
   to cover the cost of power purchases for May through the end of August. 
   The additional funds above the amount required for reimbursement are to 
   ensure that there are sufficient funds to cover the cost of summer power
   requirements. The need for this funding is due to: (1) SCIP's regional  
   linkage to the California power market and low western reservoirs, which
   contribute to high electricity prices; (2) the lack of alternative power
   providers in SCIP's service area, which leaves certain residents, such  
   as diabetics on dialysis, vulnerable to illness or death should power be
   cut off; (3) and the inability of SCIP to obtain sufficient funding to  
   purchase power by other means. The potential loss of power would have a 
   disastrous effect on the economy and human population of south-central  
   Arizona. The Department of the Interior is drafting legislation to      
   authorize the divestiture of SCIP assets and the Administration hopes to
   proceed expeditiously.                                                  
                          UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE                 
                                        CONSTRUCTION                              
      The Committee recommends $17,700,000 for construction, to remain     
   available until expended, to repair damages to U.S. Fish and Wildlife   
   Service facilities caused by floods, ice storms, and earthquakes in the 
   States of Washington, Illinois, Iowa, Minnesota, Missouri, Wisconsin,   
   New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas. The entire amount is designated by the 
   Congress as an emergency requirement pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A) of
   the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985, as       
   amended.                                                                
                                   NATIONAL PARK SERVICE                          
                                 UNITED STATES PARK POLICE                        
      The Committee recommends $1,700,000 for United States park police for
   unbudgeted increases in pension costs for retired United States park    
   police officers. These funds will allow for reinstatement of the recruit
   training class that has been delayed to pay the increased retirement    
   costs.                                                                  
                                       RELATED AGENCY                             
                                 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE                        
                                       FOREST SERVICE                             
                                 STATE AND PRIVATE FORESTRY                       
      The Committee recommends $22,000,000 for State and private forestry  
   for emergency activities associated with ice storm damage in the States 
   of Arkansas and Oklahoma, and for emergency pest suppression in several 
   areas of the country. The recommendation includes $10,000,000 for ice   
   storm damage and $12,000,000 for pest suppression and prevention        
   activities on Federal, State, Tribal, and private lands. The funds to   
   address ice storm damage are for technical forestry and community       
   assistance, development of recovery plans, forest regeneration on       
   non-Federal lands, and community fire assistance including community    
   fire presuppression, suppression and prevention activities. The funds   
   for pest suppression and prevention activities should be focused on     
   emergency needs such as suppression of southern pine beetles in the     
   South, addressing the increasing sudden oak death needs in California   
   and Oregon, suppression of bark beetles in the West, restoration of     
   forests destroyed by spruce and mountain pine beetles, and emergency    
   development, production, and release of beetles for the purpose of      
   Hemlock woolly adelgid biocontrol. The entire amount is designated by   
   the Congress as an emergency requirement pursuant to section            
   251(b)(2)(A) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of
   1985, as amended.                                                       
                                   NATIONAL FOREST SYSTEM                         
      The Committee recommends $12,000,000 for the national forest system  
   for emergency activities associated with ice storm damage in the States 
   of Arkansas and Oklahoma, and for emergency response to the emerging    
   problem of illegal marijuana cultivation and trafficking in California  
   and Kentucky. Within the amount recommended, $10,000,000 is to address  
   ice storm damage for activities associated with forest restoration      
   including the preparation and sale of forest products, re-establishment 
   of forested areas, restoration of wildlife habitat, and recreation site 
   cleanup; and $2,000,000 is to address the emerging illegal cultivation  
   and trafficking of marijuana in California and Kentucky. Such funds     
   shall be available for increased agency law enforcement activity and    
   increased cooperative support to State and local agencies. The entire   
   amount is designated by the Congress as an emergency requirement        
   pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency   
   Deficit Control Act of 1985, as amended.                                
                                  WILDLAND FIRE MANAGEMENT                        
      The Committee recommends $100,000,000 for wildland fire management to
   address additional requirements for the 2001 fire season. Current       
   indications are that the agency's fire fighting capability and available
   resources are likely to be insufficient to meet demand. The Committee   
   reminds the Administration, that a significant debt of over $300,000,000
   exists, due to borrowing from the Knutson-Vandenburg funds for past fire
   suppression activities. It is important that repayment of such borrowing
   be a high priority, should year-end Wildland Fire Management balances   
   afford such an opportunity. The entire amount is designated by the      
   Congress as an emergency requirement pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A) of
   the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985, as       
   amended.                                                                
                            CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT AND MAINTENANCE                   
      The Committee recommends $4,000,000 for capital improvement and      
   maintenance to repair damages caused by ice storms in Arkansas and      
   Oklahoma. Such funds are available for activities including maintenance 
   and reconstruction of roads accessing national forest and research sites
   and facilities, maintenance and restoration of trails, and maintenance  
   and minor reconstruction of administrative and recreation facilities.   
   The entire amount is designated by the Congress as an emergency         
   requirement pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A) of the Balanced Budget and 
   Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985, as amended.                      
                              GENERAL PROVISIONS--THIS CHAPTER                    
      The Committee recommends bill language to permit completion of a     
   wilderness study at Apostle Islands National Lakeshore, WI by the       
   National Park Service. An amount of $200,000 was provided in fiscal year
   2001 to complete this study. Because the study will not be completed    
   until fiscal year 2003, the Committee recommends extending the          
   availability of these funds.                                            
      The Committee recommends bill language extending the availability of 
   funds provided in fiscal year 2001 for maintenance, protection and      
   preservation of land in the Minuteman Missile National Historic Site,   
   South Dakota. The projects for which $5,000,000 was made available to   
   the National Park Service, through the Air Force operations and         
   maintenance account, cannot be completed this fiscal year.              
      The Committee recommends bill language to correct a Public Law       
   reference in section 338 of the Interior and Related Agencies           
   Appropriations Act for fiscal year 2001.                                
      The Committee recommends bill language modifying a provision in      
   Public Law 106 558 in order to authorize the payment of full overtime   
   rates for fire fighters in fiscal year 2001.                            
      The Committee recommends bill language to permit the Forest Service  
   to receive reimbursement for expenditures for projects that otherwise   
   qualify for the use of Federal-aid highways funds. Emergency relief for 
   Federally-owned roads is routinely made available to the Forest Service 
   in the form of Federal-aid highways funds (Department of the Treasury   
   account 12 69X8083). These monies provide critical funding for the      
   repair of forest roads made necessary by storms, floods, and other      
   natural occurrences. However, timely repair work is often needed prior  
   to Federal-aid highways funds being made available to the Forest Service
   by the Federal Highway Administration. This time lag in the provision of
   Federal-aid highways funds necessitates the interim use of agency funds,
   which were budgeted specifically for other projects, to complete such   
   repairs. The ability to reimburse accounts that were used to fund       
   projects, which would otherwise qualify for the use of Federal-Aid      
   Highways funds, is necessary to assure that both needed emergency repair
   work and regularly planned, budgeted, and approved projects are         
   completed.                                                              
                                         CHAPTER 5                                
                                    DEPARTMENT OF LABOR                           
                           EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION                 
                              TRAINING AND EMPLOYMENT SERVICES                    
                               (Rescission)                              
      The bill includes a rescission of $359,000,000 from funds provided in
   P.L. 106 554 to support the activities of the Workforce Investment Act  
   (WIA). The rescission is from amounts provided on an advance basis for  
   fiscal year 2002 to support WIA activities in program year 2001. No     
   rescission was requested by the Administration.                         
      The Department of Labor estimates that States will carry-in balances 
   of $1,778,000,000 on July 1, 2001, the beginning of program year 2001.  
   The Committee understands from the Department that historically States  
   have carried-in approximately $1,000,000,000 annually among the three   
   WIA block grants.                                                       
      The Departments of Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education,  
   and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 2001 provided advance          
   appropriations for the adult and dislocated worker employment and       
   training activities totaling $1,772,000,000. At the time the Committee  
   provided these advance appropriations, it did not anticipate such high  
   levels of unexpended balances in WIA block grant programs.              
      In view of the large carry-in balances, the Committee recommendation 
   rescinds $359,000,000 from these advanced amounts, of which $100,000,000
   is from adult employment and training activities and $259,000,000 is    
   from dislocated worker employment and training activities. Even with the
   rescission, States will have available an estimated $5,107,000,000 to   
   support WIA activities in program year 2001, $455,000,000 over amounts  
   available in program year 2000.                                         
      The President's fiscal year 2002 budget recommends reducing WIA      
   funding by $359,000,000 for program year 2002 in order to reduce the    
   high level of carry-in balances in each of the three WIA block grants.  
   The Committee believes that rescinding a portion of the advance         
   appropriations for these activities now will provide more time for the  
   States, the Administration, and the Congress to examine program         
   expenditure patterns and assess future WIA training and employment      
   service needs.                                                          
                                   PROGRAM ADMINISTRATION                         
      It has come to the Committee's attention that a number of communities
   are experiencing delays in the Department of Labor's processing of      
   petitions for Trade Adjustment Assistance. For localities whose workers 
   have been adversely affected by imports and trade agreements these job  
   training and reemployment benefits are crucial. The Committee urges the 
   Department of Labor to expedite the investigation and certification     
   processes for these benefits.                                           
                          DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES                 
                        HEALTH RESOURCES AND SERVICES ADMINISTRATION              
                               HEALTH RESOURCES AND SERVICES                      
      The funding available for construction and renovation of Scripps     
   Memorial East County Hospital in El Cajon, California shall be divided  
   equally between Sharps Grossmont Hospital, located in San Diego County  
   and El Centro Regional Medical Center, located in Imperial County.      
                          ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN AND FAMILIES                
                             LOW INCOME HOME ENERGY ASSISTANCE                    
      The bill includes $300,000,000 to serve as a reserve to provide home 
   energy assistance to low-income households, including the needs of      
   low-income households arising from extreme summer heat or other         
   emergencies, as defined in section 2603 of the Omnibus Budget           
   Reconciliation Act of 1981. This is $150,000,000 above the              
   Administration's supplemental request. The Departments of Labor, Health 
   and Human Services, and Education, and Related Agencies Appropriations  
   Act, 2001 (P.L. 106 554) provided $300,000,000 in contingent emergency  
   funds for LIHEAP. These funds were released in their entirety on        
   December 30, 2000, to address high heating fuel prices.                 
                                  DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION                         
                                      EDUCATION REFORM                            
      The bill includes a provision to make a technical correction relating
   to a project specified in the statement of the managers on the          
   conference report accompanying the Departments of Labor, Health and     
   Human Services, and Education, and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 
   2001.                                                                   
                              EDUCATION FOR THE DISADVANTAGED                     
      The bill includes a provision to make a technical correction relating
   to the amount of funding available for Basic Grants in school year 2001 
   2002.                                                                   
      The bill also includes an additional $161,000,000 for the Title I    
   Grants to States program. It is the intent of the Committee that, when  
   taken together with the technical correction to the basic grants amount,
   these additional resources will result in a final fiscal year 2001      
   appropriation of $7,397,971,000 for basic grants and $1,364,750,000 for 
   concentration grants. The Committee further intends that these          
   additional resources will be used to provide each state and local       
   educational agency the greater of either the amount it would receive at 
   levels specified in the conference report to accompany H.R. 4577 under  
   the 100-percent hold harmless or what it would receive using the        
   statutory formulas. The additional funds are necessary to fully         
   implement this agreement using updated poverty and expenditure data that
   became available in January 2001.                                       
                                         IMPACT AID                               
      The bill includes a provision requiring Impact Aid construction funds
   to be distributed in accordance with the formula provisions outlined in 
   section 8007 of the Impact Aid program as that section existed in fiscal
   year 2000.                                                              
                                     SPECIAL EDUCATION                            
      The bill includes a provision to make a technical correction relating
   to a project specified in the statement of the managers on the          
   conference report accompanying the Departments of Labor, Health and     
   Human Services, and Education, and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 
   2001.                                                                   
                      EDUCATION RESEARCH, STATISTICS, AND IMPROVEMENT             
      The bill includes a provision to make technical corrections relating 
   to the amount of funding available for projects specified in the        
   statement of the managers on the conference report accompanying the     
   Departments of Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education, and     
   Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 2001.                              
                                         CHAPTER 6                                
                                     LEGISLATIVE BRANCH                           
                                  CONGRESSIONAL OPERATIONS                        
                                  HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES                        
                PAYMENTS TO WIDOWS AND HEIRS OF DECEASED MEMBERS OF CONGRESS      
      The bill provides the traditional death gratuity for the widow of    
   Norman Sisisky, late a Representative from the Commonwealth of Virginia,
   and the heir of John Joseph Moakley, late a Representative from the     
   Commonwealth of Massachusetts.                                          
                                   SALARIES AND EXPENSES                          
          MEMBERS' REPRESENTATIONAL ALLOWANCES, STANDING COMMITTEES, SPECIAL AND  
          SELECT, COMMITTEE ON APPROPRIATIONS, ALLOWANCES AND EXPENSES            
      The bill includes an additional $44,214,000 for Members'             
   Representational Allowances (MRA's), standing committees, special and   
   select, the Committee on Appropriations and allowances and expenses.    
   Funds for MRA's and committees have been requested by the House in the  
   Administration's supplemental submission to support the increased       
   authorizations recently approved by the House of Representatives. Funds 
   are also provided for increased benefit costs associated with the       
   related staff increases.                                                
      Since the Committee on House Administration Committee funding        
   resolution spans the biennial period of the 107th Congress, the bill    
   provides $9,776,000 within the above amount to remain available until   
   December 31, 2002, for committee salaries and expenses.                 
                              SALARIES, OFFICERS AND EMPLOYEES                    
      The bill provides an additional amount for salaries and expenses of  
   the Office of the Clerk and the Office of the Chief Administrative      
   Officer totaling $17,448,000. The Clerk is provided $3,150,000 including
   $2,500,000 for the continuation of the project to replace the current   
   Legislative Information Management Systems (LIMS) and $650,000 to fund  
   anticipated expenses of the Office of the House Employment Counsel.     
      The Chief Administrative Officer is provided $14,298,000. This       
   funding will allow upgrades to hardware and infrastructure for improved 
   and higher speed network connectivity between Member Washington and     
   district offices and within the House campus.                           
                                    OFFICE OF COMPLIANCE                          
                                   SALARIES AND EXPENSES                          
      The bill provides $35,000 to the Office of Compliance for unexpected 
   requests for counseling and mediation services.                         
                                 GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE                       
                             CONGRESSIONAL PRINTING AND BINDING                   
      The bill provides $11,900,000 to fund a shortfall based on the       
   increased volume of printing of publications and associated information 
   products and services ordered by Congress during fiscal years 2000 and  
   2001.                                                                   
                         GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE REVOLVING FUND                
      The Committee recognizes the need to replace the air conditioning    
   system at the Government Printing Office. The chillers, which date back 
   to the 1970's, are in critical need of replacement. They have outlived  
   their useful life and are obsolete, energy inefficient, and pose a      
   threat to the environment through the use of chlorofluorocarbons. In    
   order to avoid the potential failure of the entire system and provide   
   for energy efficient lighting, the bill provides the necessary funding  
   of $6,000,000.                                                          
                                    LIBRARY OF CONGRESS                           
                                   SALARIES AND EXPENSES                          
      The Library of Congress and the United States Military Academy       
   initiated a collaborative telecommunications project during fiscal year 
   2001 to ensure that the undergraduate cadet population has effective    
   access to digitized primary source material which is available through  
   the Library's Internet site. To further the project, the Committee has  
   provided an additional $600,000 to upgrade the current network          
   infrastructure within the cadet barracks.                               
      The Committee acknowledges that the Library of Congress is           
   endeavoring to acquire the 1507 world map by Waldseemueller and is      
   seeking private funding to support the acquisition. The committee fully 
   supports the initiative to acquire this major treasure for its library. 
   The 1507 World Map by Martin Waldseemueller, the first work of any kind 
   to designate as America the newly discovered Western Hemisphere, is     
   often called ``America's birth certificate.'' As such this nearly       
   500-year old map is a significant historical document that should be    
   held by the people of the United States and exhibited in Congress'      
   library. The Committee urges the librarian to seek an extension from the
   German Ministry of Culture to its June 30, 2001, deadline for the       
   expiration of the export license to allow the Library of Congress every 
   opportunity to acquire for America this most important historical       
   document.                                                               
                                         CHAPTER 7                                
                                DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION                      
                              FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION                     
                                 GRANTS-IN-AID FOR AIRPORTS                       
                     (Airport and Airway Trust Fund)                     
                  (Rescission of Contract Authorization)                 
      The bill rescinds $30,000,000 in contract authority for the          
   ``Grants-in-aid for airports'' program. This funding is above annual    
   obligation limitations on this program, and is therefore not available  
   for use in the program. As such, the rescission will have no effect on  
   current operations.                                                     
                                        COAST GUARD                               
                                     OPERATING EXPENSES                           
      The recommendation includes an additional $92,000,000, as requested, 
   for Coast Guard operating expenses. Funding has been made available     
   until September 30, 2002. These funds are needed to address: increased  
   fuel costs ($37,000,000); additional pay and benefits mandated or       
   authorized under the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 
   2001 ($31,000,000); shortages in aviation spare parts ($20,000,000); and
   costs of deploying port security units to the Middle East ($4,000,000). 
                                         CHAPTER 8                                
                                 DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY                       
                                    DEPARTMENTAL OFFICES                          
                          SALARIES AND EXPENSES                          
      The Committee has not provided the President's request for an        
   additional $60,601,000 to fund operational and perimeter security       
   support for the 2002 Winter Olympics in Salt Lake City, Utah. The       
   Committee supports this funding, which would cover both increased       
   Treasury Department workload as well as travel, overtime and related    
   costs of agencies providing security support. The Committee expects to  
   include such funding in the fiscal year 2002 appropriation.             
                                FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT SERVICE                      
                          Salaries and Expenses                          
      The Committee recommends an appropriation of $49,576,000 for the     
   Financial Management Service to implement a tax rate reduction credit as
   specified in section 101 of the Economic Growth and Tax Relief          
   Reconciliation Act of 2001. The funding supports the purchase of check  
   stock and other related paper supplies, as well as postage and other    
   costs associated with processing and mailing tax rate reduction credit  
   checks to taxpayers. The Committee directs the Financial Management     
   Service to provide a detailed report on the expenditures made pursuant  
   to this appropriation 120 days after the enactment of this Act.         
                                  INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE                        
                  Processing, Assistance, and Management                 
      The Committee recommends an appropriation of $66,200,000 for the     
   Internal Revenue Service to implement a tax rate reduction credit as    
   specified in section 101 of the Economic Growth and Tax Relief          
   Reconciliation Act of 2001. The funding supports advance mailings to    
   taxpayers of the tax rate reduction credit schedule as well as related  
   customer service and account reconciliation activities. The Committee   
   directs the Internal Revenue Service to provide a detailed report on the
   expenditures made pursuant to this appropriation 120 days after the     
   enactment of this Act.                                                  
                                         CHAPTER 9                                
                               DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS                     
                              VETERANS BENEFITS ADMINISTRATION                    
                        Compensation and Pensions                        
      The Committee recommends an additional $589,413,000 for compensation 
   and pension payments to eligible veterans. Supplemental funds are needed
   in fiscal year 2001 in order to meet cost of living adjustments, and    
   program enhancements and benefits contained in legislation enacted after
   passage of the fiscal year 2001 appropriations bill.                    
                          Readjustment Benefits                          
      The Committee recommends an additional $347,000,000 to meet          
   Montgomery GI Bill benefit enhancements contained in legislation enacted
   after passage of the fiscal year 2001 appropriations bill.              
                               VETERANS HEALTH ADMINISTRATION                     
                     Medical and Prosthetic Research                     
      The Committee recognizes that the VA research program must undertake 
   a certain level of travel to properly optimize the function and         
   oversight of this worthwhile program and includes language increasing   
   the current fiscal year 2001 travel limitation from $2,500,000 to       
   $3,500,000.                                                             
                                DEPARTMENTAL ADMINISTRATION                       
                        General Operating Expenses                       
                      (including transfer of funds)                      
      The Committee recommends $19,000,000 be transferred from the Medical 
   Care account to General Operating Expenses exclusively for the Veterans 
   Benefits Administration (VBA). VBA is aggressively pursuing a proactive 
   approach to solving the mounting claims problem by hiring and training  
   additional claims adjudicators immediately. The additional $19,000,000  
   from Medical Care, plus $7,000,000 of reprogrammed GOE funds, will allow
   VBA to hire and train approximately 400 new personnel.                  
      As a result of the hiring plan, VBA will need an increased travel    
   limitation in FY 2001 over the originally requested level to support    
   this training effort. The new fiscal year 2001 GOE travel limitation is 
   $17,500,000.                                                            
                        DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT               
                                 PUBLIC AND INDIAN HOUSING                        
                         HOUSING CERTIFICATE FUND                        
                               (Rescission)                              
      The Committee recommendation includes a rescission of $114,300,000 of
   unobligated appropriations to the Housing Certificate Fund and its      
   predecessor programs.                                                   
                             COMMUNITY PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT                   
                        Community Development Fund                       
      The Committee has included language which clarifies Congressional    
   intent with respect to appropriations made for construction at a New    
   Jersey university medical center, to improve cyber-districts in         
   Massachusetts, and for wastewater and combined sewer overflow           
   infrastructure improvements in Massachusetts.                           
                                      HOUSING PROGRAMS                            
                   Manufactured Housing Fees Trust Fund                  
      The recommendation includes language to provide authority for the    
   expenditure of fees collected and deposited into the Manufactured       
   Housing Fees Trust Fund for fiscal year 2001. The Manufactured Housing  
   Improvement Act of 2000, enacted on December 27, 2000, created this new 
   fund and made expenditures from the fund subject to annual              
   appropriations. Technical drafting errors in the statute have resulted  
   in HUD being unable to spend fees collected in fiscal year 2001,        
   threatening a shutdown of the program. Therefore, language is included  
   to rectify this situation.                                              
                               FEDERAL HOUSING ADMINISTRATION                     
              FHA--Mutual Mortgage Insurance Program Account             
      The recommendation includes language giving the Department authority 
   to use existing fiscal year 2001 appropriations to take corrective      
   action in response to a probable fiscal year 2000 violation of the      
   Anti-Deficiency Act. In fiscal year 2000, FHA funded a $33,000,000      
   advertising campaign promoting HUD programs. A portion of this program's
   funding was derived from a non-appropriated account, the authorized use 
   of which is limited to disposition of FHA properties. According to HUD  
   officials, the use of this fund has resulted in a likely violation of   
   the Anti-Deficiency Act that is estimated by HUD to total $6,900,000    
   plus interest. The Committee's recommendation includes language to allow
   HUD flexibility to pay the obligation and accrued interest from within  
   existing fiscal year 2001 appropriations for FHA administrative expenses
   and for HUD's salaries and expenses.                                    
              FHA--General and Special Risk Program Account              
      The recommendation includes an additional $40,000,000 in credit      
   subsidy appropriations for the General Insurance and Special Risk       
   Insurance (GI/SRI) program account. The Committee notes that for the    
   second consecutive year, FHA has sought a supplemental appropriation    
   because of the inability of the programs to operate within the resources
   provided. This additional appropriation, when combined with a premium   
   increase for apartment development programs as assumed in the           
   Administration's supplemental funding request, will provide FHA         
   sufficient resources to guarantee all multi-family loans meeting FHA    
   underwriting criteria through the remainder of this fiscal year. Changes
   in the premium structure will ensure that most FHA apartment development
   programs operate in a self-sustaining manner like most other FHA        
   programs, including the single-family insurance program, thereby        
   averting further shutdowns in the program. Therefore, language is also  
   included to condition the release of this additional amount upon        
   implementation of an interim final rule revising premium structure for  
   programs provided for under this heading.                               
      The Committee is also concerned that insufficient FHA management and 
   oversight has contributed to the inability of the programs to operate   
   within the funding provided. Increased FHA management and oversight of  
   these programs, coupled with reduced reliance on direct appropriations, 
   will enable FHA programs to operate in an uninterrupted manner. The     
   Committee expects FHA to take all actions necessary to strengthen its   
   management and financial oversight of these programs, and to provide a  
   report to the Committee no later than August 15, 2001, identifying the  
   corrective actions taken to address these issues.                       
                                    INDEPENDENT AGENCIES                          
                                DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE--CIVIL                      
                                 CEMETERIAL EXPENSES, ARMY                        
                          Salaries and Expenses                          
      The Committee recommends an additional $243,059 for Arlington        
   National Cemetery to pay a disputed water bill consistent with statutory
   requirements in the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2001 (Public Law   
   106 554).                                                               
                              ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY                     
                  Environmental Programs and Management                  
      The Committee has included language in the bill which clarifies      
   Congressional intent with respect to an appropriation made in fiscal    
   year 2001 for work on New York watersheds.                              
                    State and Tribal Assistance Grants                   
      The Committee has included language in the bill which clarifies      
   Congressional intent with respect to appropriations made for four       
   specific projects. The Committee has also included a technical amendment
   which states the correct appropriations level provided in Public Law 106
   377 for state and tribal assistance grants.                             
                            FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY                   
                             DISASTER RELIEF                             
                               (rescission)                              
      The Committee has included a provision rescinding $389,200,000 from  
   the disaster relief fund. These funds are not required by the Federal   
   Emergency Management Agency at this time.                               
                       NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION              
                            Human Space Flight                           
      The Committee has included language in the bill which would remove a 
   restriction placed on $40,000,000 of the funding provided in the fiscal 
   year 2000 appropriation for Human Space Flight. The fiscal year 2000    
   language restricted the use of the funding for a shuttle research       
   mission to be accomplished after STS 107 and December of 2001. With     
   delays in the overhaul of the space shuttle Columbia, and other delays  
   caused by changes to the shuttle manifest, NASA's STS 107 research      
   mission has been rescheduled for May of 2002 and the follow-on mission  
   is not currently manifested. NASA has already used $8,000,000 of the    
   $40,000,000 set-aside to prepare for the follow-on mission. With this   
   language change, NASA will be able to use $17,000,000 to cover the costs
   associated with the delay of STS 107 mission and $15,000,000 will be    
   used for research to be carried out on the International Space Station. 
   The Committee remains concerned about the level of research conducted on
   the International Space Station and wishes to stress the importance of  
   utilizing the laboratory facilities for scientific research.            
      The Committee is concerned to learn that the follow-on research      
   mission is not even scheduled until 2004. This mission was intended as a
   gap-filler to support the scientific community during construction of   
   the International Space Station. Pushing this mission back another three
   years will only further exacerbate existing strains on the underfunded  
   life and microgravity science community.                                
      The supplemental request had sought authority to offset further costs
   for preparing STS 107 from the $15,000,000 set aside for space station  
   research. This request is denied. If further funding is required for STS
   107 in fiscal year 2002, NASA is directed to submit a budget amendment  
   to identify funds for this purpose. According to the Congressional      
   Research Service, $462,000,000 has been transferred from space station  
   research to construction from fiscal years 1996 98. These constant      
   transfers have undermined the preparedness of the research community to 
   utilize the station and created an atmosphere of significant            
   uncertainty. The Committee is also aware that NASA has proposed a       
   significant space station research realignment in fiscal year 2002.     
   Further transfers would be extremely detrimental to research efforts.   
   Therefore, the Committee language requires that $15,000,000 only be used
   for space station research. The Committee supports the completion of the
   STS 107 mission but believes that whenever possible future year         
   liabilities should be addressed through regular order instead of through
   anticipated reprogrammed actions.                                       
                              GENERAL PROVISION--THIS CHAPTER                     
      Sec. 2901. The bill includes a provision that clarifies congressional
   intent that funds appropriated for the Community development fund shall 
   be available for two fiscal years.                                      
                                         TITLE III                                
                                GENERAL PROVISION--THIS ACT                       
      Section 3001. This provision provides that no part of any            
   appropriation contained in this Act shall remain available for          
   obligation beyond the current fiscal year unless expressly so provided  
   in this Act.                                                            
      Section 3002. The bill includes a general provision that requires,   
   within five days of enactment of this Act, the Secretary of State to    
   report to the Committee on Appropriations on the projected uses of the  
   unobligated balances of funds available under the heading ``Agency for  
   International Development, International Disaster Assistance'',         
   including plans for allocating additional resources to respond to the   
   damage caused by the earthquakes that occurred in El Salvador in January
   and February, 2001.                                                     
                         CHANGES IN THE APPLICATION OF EXISTING LAW               
      Pursuant to clause 3(f)(1) of rule XIII of the Rules of the House of 
   Representatives, the following statements are submitted describing the  
   effect of provisions in the accompanying bill which directly or         
   indirectly change the application of existing law.                      
      The bill includes several appropriations that are not authorized by  
   law and as such may be construed as legislative in nature.              
      The bill includes several emergency appropriation designations that  
   may be construed as legislative in nature.                              
      Language has been included for Department of Defense--Military, in   
   ``Operation and Maintenance, Army'', which extends the availability of  
   funds for California energy demand reduction.                           
      Language has been included for Department of Defense--Military, in   
   ``Operation and Maintenance, Navy'', which extends the availability of  
   funds for California energy demand reduction.                           
      Language has been included for Department of Defense--Military, in   
   ``Operation and Maintenance, Air Force'', which extends the availability
   of funds for California energy demand reduction.                        
      Language has been included for Department of Defense--Military, in   
   ``Shipbuilding and Conversion, Navy'', which provides funds for transfer
   to other shipbuilding programs.                                         
      Language has been included for Department of Defense--Military, in   
   ``Defense Health Program'', which provides funds to cover increases in  
   TRICARE contract costs associated with the provision of health care     
   services to eligible beneficiaries of all the uniformed services.       
      Language has been included for Department of Defense--Military, in   
   ``Defense Health Program'', which provides funds to improve the quality 
   of care provided at military treatment facilities.                      
      Language has been included for Department of Defense--Military, which
   restricts the availability of funds provided in this Act to the same    
   time period as the amounts appropriated in Public Law 106 259 unless    
   otherwise specified.                                                    
      Language has been included for Department of Defense--Military,      
   concerning funds for intelligence related programs.                     
      Language has been included for Department of Defense--Military, which
   provides funds for the repair of the U.S.S. COLE.                       
      Language has been included for Department of Defense--Military, which
   rescinds funds from various activities funded in previously enacted     
   Defense Appropriations Acts.                                            
      Language has been included for Department of Defense--Military, which
   provides funds for facilities repair and damages resulting from natural 
   disasters.                                                              
      Language has been included for Department of Defense--Military, which
   extends the authorities provided in section 816 of the National Defense 
   Authorization Act for 1995 (Public Law 103 337), as amended, through    
   January 31, 2002.                                                       
      The bill includes language under Title I, Chapter 3, which provides  
   funds for Military Construction, Army, Military Construction, Navy,     
   Military Construction, Air Force, Family Housing, Army, Family Housing, 
   Navy and Marine Corps, Family Housing, Air Force, and the Department of 
   Defense Base Realignment and Closure Account 1990.                      
      A general provision is included authorizing the Department of the    
   Army to expend funds in addition to amounts specified in section 138 of 
   Public Law 106 246 for the Cadet Physical Development Center only for   
   the purposes of meeting unanticipated price increases.                  
      A general provision is included making funds provided in Chapter 3   
   available for the same time period as the amounts appropriated under    
   each such heading in Public Law 106 246.                                
      The bill includes a general provision that directs the Corps of      
   Engineers to use $500,000 of the funds provided in Public Law 106 377 to
   complete work on the Chickamauga Lock, Tennessee feasibility.           
      A general provision is included rescinding funds from previous       
   Military Construction Appropriations Acts.                              
      The bill includes language which makes technical corrections         
   regarding the Rural Community Advancement Program.                      
      The bill includes a provision that clarifies the authorized uses of  
   funds under a small business grant program.                             
      The bill includes rescissions under ``Governmental Direction and     
   Support'' and under ``Public Safety and Justice''.                      
      The bill includes the transfer of funds under ``Public Education     
   System''.                                                               
      The bill includes language under ``Public Education System'' which   
   requires proceeds and interest accruing thereon from the sale of the    
   University of the District of Columbia radio station WDCU that are in an
   escrow account of the control board to be used for the University's     
   Endowment Fund and allows the funds to be invested in equity based      
   securities if approved by the District's Chief Financial Officer.       
      The bill includes language which directs the Corps of Engineers to   
   undertake the project authorized by section 518 of Public Law 106 53.   
      The bill includes language under Weapons Activities providing for the
   initiation of two construction projects in fiscal year 2001.            
      The bill includes language under Western Area Power Administration   
   providing that the funds to complete the planning and environmental     
   studies to support the proposed transmission line shall be              
   non-reimbursable.                                                       
      The bill includes a provision that extends the availability of       
   funding for a wilderness study at Apostle Islands National Lakeshore and
   for maintenance, protection and preservation of land at the Minuteman   
   Missile National Historic Site; correcting a citation in a provision    
   from the fiscal year 2001 Interior and Related Agencies Appropriations  
   Act; changing the effective date of a provision dealing with overtime   
   pay for fire fighters; and permitting the reimbursement of Federal-aid  
   highways funds for Forest Service emergency road reconstruction.        
      The bill includes a provision that provides additional Low Income    
   Home Energy Assistance funding under emergency authority without the    
   emergency designation requirement.                                      
      The bill includes a provision that requires Impact Aid construction  
   funds to be distributed in accordance with the formula provisions       
   outlined in section 8007 of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act  
   of 1965 as that section existed in fiscal year 2000.                    
      The bill includes language under the Department of Veterans Affairs, 
   medical and prosthetic research and general operating expenses, which   
   changes the limitation on travel expenditures.                          
      The bill includes language under the Department of Veterans Affairs, 
   which transfers money from medical care to general operating expenses   
   for the purpose of expediting claims processing.                        
      The bill includes language under the Department of Housing and Urban 
   Development, manufactured housing fees trust fund, providing authority  
   for expenditure of fees collected in the Fund in fiscal year 2001.      
      The bill includes language under the Department of Housing and Urban 
   Development, FHA--mutual mortgage insurance fund program account,       
   permitting funds available in fiscal year 2001 for FHA administrative   
   expenses and HUD salaries and expenses to be used to liquidate          
   deficiencies, which occurred in fiscal year 2000.                       
      The bill includes language under the Department of Housing and Urban 
   Development, FHA--general and special risk insurance, limiting the      
   availability of funds until implementation of a final interim rule      
   revising the premium structure of program provided under this account.  
      The bill includes language under the National Aeronautics and Space  
   Administration, human space flight, which deletes a restrictive proviso 
   included in the fiscal year 2000 appropriation.                         
      The bill includes a provision that provides that of the unobligated  
   balances available under the heading ``National Aeronautics and Space   
   Administration, Human space flight,'' $15,000,000 shall be used only for
   research to be carried out on the International Space Station.          
      The bill includes a provision that requires within five days of      
   enactment of this Act the Secretary of State to report to the Committee 
   on Appropriations on the projected uses of the unobligated balances of  
   funds available under the heading ``Agency for International            
   Development, International Disaster Assistance.''                       
      In several instances, funds are provided to remain available until   
   expended.                                                               
                            APPROPRIATIONS NOT AUTHORIZED BY LAW                  
      Pursuant to clause 3(f)(1) of rule XIII of the Rules of the House of 
   Representatives, the following table lists the appropriations in the    
   accompanying bill which are not authorized by law:                      
                                                                           [In thousands of dollars]                                                                           
Agency/Program                                      Last year of authorization     Authorization level     Appropriations in last year of authorization    Appropriations in this bill  
Department of Defense--Military:                                          2001                   (\1\)                                      $22,175,357                       $164,000  
Department of Energy:                                                     1984                   (\2\)                                            (\2\)                         11,950  
Department of Education:                                                  2000                   (\4\)                                    7,941,397,000                    161,000,000  
House of Representatives:                                                                                                                                                      290,200  
Department of Transportation:                                             1999               3,006,200                                        3,013,506                     92,000,000  
Department of Housing and Urban Development:                              1994               4,168,000                                        4,825,000                      5,057,550  
\1\The Fiscal Year 2001 National Defense Authorization Act (P.L. 106 398) authorizes $75,801,666,000 for military personnel.
\2\Funding for environmental cleanup activities included in this account was previously 
included as part of regular facility operations and spread throughout many of the Department
of Energy programs. The last year of authorization for these programs was 1984. However, in 
1989 the cleanup activities were separated from regular facility operations and merged into the 
non-defense environmental management appropriation account. There has not been a separate 
authorization for this account.   
\3\Funding for each of these projects was authorized as part of Project 01 D 103, Project 
Engineering and Design. However, the activities to be performed in fiscal year 2001 are 
construction, not design, necessitating a transfer of the funds to new line-item construction
projects.
\4\Such sums.
                             TRANSFER OF FUNDS                            
      Pursuant to clause 3(f)(2) of rule XIII of the Rules of the House of 
   Representatives, the following is submitted describing the transfer of  
   funds provided in the accompanying bill.                                
Account to                                                              Amount  Account from                                             Amount  
District of Columbia Funds Public Education Systeml                  l$250,000  lFederal fundsl                                       l$250,000  
Department of Veterans Affairs, General Operating Expensesl        l19,000,000  lDepartment of Veterans Affairs, Medical Care       l19,000,000  
      Language has been included in Department of Defense--Military, which 
   provides for the transfer of $222,000,000 from ``Shipbuilding and       
   Conversion, Navy'', to certain shipbuilding programs.                   
      Language has been included for Department of Defense--Military, which
   allows for transfers of funds between ``Operation and Maintenance,      
   Navy'', and appropriations accounts for Procurement, for activities     
   associated with the repair of the U.S.S. COLE.                          
                                        RESCISSIONS                               
      Pursuant to clause 3(f)(2) of rule XIII of the Rules of the House of 
   Representatives, the following table is submitted describing the        
   rescissions recommended in the accompanying bill:                       
                            RESCISSIONS RECOMMENDED IN THE BILL                   
Amounts recommended                                                     
Department or Activity                                                  
for rescission                                                          
    Department of Defense:                                                  
                                         $3,000,000
                                         81,000,000
                                         330,000,000
                                         5,000,000
                                         260,000,000
                                         65,000,000
                                         85,000,000
                                         5,000,000
          Department of Defense, Previous Military Construction Appropriations Acts                70,500,000
    District of Columbia funds:                                             
                                         250,000
                                         131,000
          Department of Labor: Employment and Training Administration, Training and      Employment Services                359,000,000
          Department of Transportation: Grants-in-Aid for Airports (contract authority)                30,000,000
          Department of Housing and Urban Development: Public and Indian Housing         Certificate Fund                \1\114,300,000
          Federal Emergency Management Agency: Disaster Relief                389,200,000
                  \1\In addition, the bill rescinds an undesignated amount to be 
         determined on September 30, 2001.                                       
                           COMPARISON WITH THE BUDGET RESOLUTION                  
      Clause 3(c)(2) of rule XIII of the Rules of the House of             
   Representatives requires an explanation of compliance with section      
   308(a)(1)(A) of the Congressional Budget and Impoundment Control Act of 
   1974 (Public Law 93 344), as amended, which requires that the report    
   accompanying a bill providing new budget authority contain a statement  
   detailing how that authority compares with the reports submitted under  
   section 302 of the Act for the most recently agreed to concurrent       
   resolution on the budget for the fiscal year from the Committee's       
   section 302(a) allocation. This information follows:                    
                            [In millions of dollars]                           
                      Remaining section 302(a) allocation    This bill  
Discretionary:                                      6,874        6,545  
Mandatory:                                            937          937  
                                FIVE-YEAR OUTLAY PROJECTIONS                      
      In compliance with section 308(a)(1)(B) of the Congressional Budget  
   and Impoundment Control Act of 1974 (Public Law 93 344), as amended, the
   following table contains five-year projections associated with the      
   budget authority provided in the accompanying bill:                     
Millions                                                                
          Budget Authority               7,482
    Outlays:                                                                
                                         2,276
                                         4,229
                                         758
                                         20
                                         -83
                         ASSISTANCE TO STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENTS                
      In accordance with section 308(a)(1)(C) of the Congressional Budget  
   and Impoundment Control Act of 1974 (Public Law 93 344), as amended, the
   financial assistance to State and local governments is as follows:      
Millions                                                                
          Budget Authority               54
          Fiscal Year 2001 outlays resulting therefrom                100
                                  CONSTITUTIONAL AUTHORITY                        
      Clause 3(d)(1) of rule XIII of the Rules of the House of             
   Representatives states that:                                            
                     Each report of a committee on a bill or joint      
          resolution of a public character, shall include a statement   
          citing the specific powers granted to the Congress in the     
          Constitution to enact the law proposed by the bill or joint   
          resolution.                                                   
      The Committee on Appropriations bases its authority to report this   
   legislation from Clause 7 of Section 9 of Article I of the Constitution 
   of the United States of America which states:                           
                     No money shall be drawn from the Treasury but in   
          consequence of Appropriations made by law * * *               
      Appropriations contained in this Act are made pursuant to this       
   specific power granted by the Constitution.                             
                   STATEMENT OF GENERAL PERFORMANCE GOALS AND OBJECTIVES          
      Pursuant to clause 3(c)(4) of rule XIII of the Rules of the House of 
   Representatives, the following is a statement of general performance    
   goals and objectives for which this measure authorizes funding:         
      The Committee on Appropriations considers program performance,       
   including a program's success in developing and attaining               
   outcome-related goals and objectives, in developing funding             
   recommendations.                                                        
                   COMPLIANCE WITH CLAUSE 3 OF RULE XIII (RAMSEYER RULE)          
      In compliance with clause 3(e) of rule XIII of the Rules of the House
   of Representatives, changes in existing law made by the bill, as        
   reported, are shown as follows (existing law proposed to be omitted is  
   enclosed in black brackets, new matter is printed in italic, existing   
   law in which no change is proposed is shown in roman):                  
             AGRICULTURE, RURAL DEVELOPMENT, FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, AND    
                    RELATED AGENCIES APPROPRIATIONS ACT, 2001                     
         * * * * * * *                                                           
                            TITLE III--RURAL DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMS                 
         * * * * * * *                                                           
                            RURAL COMMUNITY ADVANCEMENT PROGRAM                   
      For the cost of direct loans, loan guarantees, and grants, as        
   authorized by 7 U.S.C. 1926, 1926a, 1926c, 1926d, and 1932, except for  
   sections 381E H, 381N, and 381O of the Consolidated Farm and Rural      
   Development Act, $762,542,000, to remain available until expended, of   
   which $53,225,000 shall be for rural community programs described in    
   section 381E(d)(1) of such Act; of which $644,360,000 shall be for the  
   rural utilities programs described in sections 381E(d)(2), 306C(a)(2),  
   and 306D of such Act; and of which $64,957,000 shall be for the rural   
   business and cooperative development programs described in section      
   381E(d)(3) of such Act: Provided , That of the total amount appropriated
   in this account, $24,000,000 shall be for loans and grants to benefit   
   Federally Recognized Native American Tribes, including grants for       
   drinking and waste disposal systems pursuant to section 306C of such    
   Act, of which $250,000 shall be available for a grant to a qualified    
   national organization to provide technical assistance for rural         
   transportation in order to promote economic development: Provided       
   further , That of the amount appropriated for rural community programs, 
   $6,000,000 shall be available for a Rural Community Development         
   Initiative: Provided further , That such funds shall be used solely to  
   develop the capacity and ability of ability of low income rural         
   communities and private, nonprofit community-based housing and community
   development organizations serving low-income rural communities,         
   including Federally Recognized Indian tribes to undertake projects to   
   improve housing, community facilities, community and economic           
   development projects in rural areas: Provided further , That such funds 
   shall be made available to qualified private, nonprofit intermediary    
   organizations (including tribal) proposing to carry out a program of    
   financial and technical assistance to assistance and to other public    
   entities with a record of achievement in providing technical and        
   financial assistance to housing and community development organizations 
   in rural areas: Provided further , That such intermediary organizations 
   shall provide matching funds from other sources, including Federal funds
   for related activities, in an amount not less than funds provided:      
   Provided further , That of the amount appropriated for rural community  
   programs, not to exceed $5,000,000 shall be for hazardous weather early 
   warning systems: Provided further , That of the amount appropriated for 
   the rural business and cooperative development programs, not to exceed  
   $500,000 shall be made available for a grant to a qualified national    
   organization to provide technical assistance for rural transportation in
   order to promote economic development; $5,000,000 shall be for rural    
   partnership technical assistance grants; and $2,000,000 shall be for    
   grants to Mississippi Delta Region counties: Provided further , That of 
   the amount appropriated for rural utilities programs, not to exceed     
   $20,000,000 shall be for water and waste disposal systems to benefit the
   Colonias along the United States/Mexico borders, including grants       
   pursuant to section 306C of such Act; not to exceed $20,000,000 shall be
   for water and waste disposal systems for rural and native villages in   
   Alaska pursuant to section 306D of such Act, with up to 1 percent       
   available to administer the program and up to 1 percent available to    
   improve interagency coordination; not to exceed $16,215,000 shall be for
   technical assistance grants for rural waste systems pursuant to section 
   306(a)(14) of such Act; and not to exceed $9,500,000 shall be for       
   contracting with qualified national organizations for a circuit rider   
   program to provide technical assistance for rural water systems:        
   Provided further , That of the total amount appropriated, not to exceed 
   $42,574,650 shall be available through June 30, 2001, for authorized    
   empowerment zones and enterprise communities and communities designated 
   by the Secretary of Agriculture as Rural Economic Area Partnership      
   Zones; of which $34,704,000 shall be for the rural utilities programs   
   described in section 381E(d)(2) of such Act; and of which $8,435,000    
   shall be for the rural business and cooperative development programs    
   described in section 381E(d)(3) of such Act.                            
         * * * * * * *                                                           
                                 D.C. CODE, SECTION 31 1408                       
                             SUBCHAPTER I--FEDERAL CITY COLLEGE                   
          31 1408. Appropriation in lieu of donation of public lands              
      In lieu of extending to the District of Columbia those provisions of 
   the Act of July 2, 1862 (7 U.S.C. 301 to 305, 307, and 308), relating to
   donations of public lands or land scrip for the endowment and           
   maintenance of colleges for the benefit of agriculture and the mechanic 
   arts, there is authorized to be appropriated to the District of Columbia
   the sum of $7,241,706. Amounts appropriated under this section shall be 
   held and considered to have been granted to the District of Columbia    
   subject to those provisions of that Act applicable to the proceeds from 
   the sale of land or land scrip, except that the funds appropriated in   
   this section also may be invested in equity based securities if approved
   by the Chief financial Officer of the District of Columbia. In addition,
   any proceeds and interest accruing thereon, which remain from the sale  
   of the former radio station WDCU in an escrow account of the District of
   Columbia Financial Management and Assistance Authority for the benefit  
   of the University of the District of Columbia, shall be used for the    
   University of the District of Columbia's Endowment Fund. Such proceeds  
   may be invested in equity based securities if approved by the Chief     
   Financial Officer of the District of Columbia.                          
         * * * * * * *                                                           
            DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR AND RELATED AGENCIES APPROPRIATIONS ACT,   
                                      2001                                        
         * * * * * * *                                                           
                                TITLE III--GENERAL PROVISIONS                     
         * * * * * * *                                                           
       Sec. 338. The authority to enter into stewardship and end result    
   contracts provided to the Forest Service in accordance with section 347 
   of title III of section 101(e) of division A of Public Law 105 825 105  
   277 is hereby expanded to authorize the Forest Service to enter into an 
   additional 28 contracts subject to the same terms and conditions as     
   provided in that section: Provided, That of the additional contracts    
   authorized by this section at least 9 shall be allocated to Region 1 and
   at least 3 to Region 6.                                                 
         * * * * * * *                                                           
             NATIONAL FOREST AND PUBLIC LANDS OF NEVADA ENHANCEMENT ACT OF 1988   
         * * * * * * *                                                           
          SEC. 2. OVERTIME PAY FOR CERTAIN FIREFIGHTERS.                          
   (a) * * *                                                               
      (b) Effective Date. --The amendments made by this section shall take 
   effect on the first day of the first applicable pay period beginning on 
   or after the end of the 30-day period beginning on the date of the      
   enactment of this Act, and shall apply only to funds appropriated after 
   the date of the enactment of this Act.                                  
      (b) Effective Date. --The amendments made by this section shall take 
   effect on the date of enactment of this Act.                            
         * * * * * * *                                                           
            DEPARTMENTS OF LABOR, HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES, AND EDUCATION, AND   
                    RELATED AGENCIES APPROPRIATIONS ACT, 2001                     
         * * * * * * *                                                           
                             TITLE III--DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION                   
         * * * * * * *                                                           
                              EDUCATION FOR THE DISADVANTAGED                     
     For carrying out title I of the Elementary and Secondary Education   
  Act of 1965, and section 418A of the Higher Education Act of 1965,      
  $9,532,621,000, of which $2,731,921,000 shall become available on July  
  1, 2001, and shall remain available through September 30, 2002, and of  
  which $6,758,300,000 shall become available on October 1, 2001 and shall
  remain available through September 30, 2002, for academic year 2001     
  2002: Provided , That $7,332,721,000 $7,237,721,000 shall be available  
  for basic grants under section 1124: Provided further , That            
  $225,000,000 of these funds shall be allocated among the States in the  
  same proportion as funds are allocated among the States under section   
  1122, to carry out section 1116(c): Provided further , That 100 percent 
  of these funds shall be allocated by States to local educational        
  agencies for the purposes of carrying out section 1116(c): Provided     
  further , That all local educational agencies receiving an allocation   
  under the preceding proviso, and all other local educational agencies   
  that are within a State that receives funds under part A of title I of  
  the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (other than a local  
  educational agency within a State receiving a minimum grant under       
  section 1124(d) or 1124A(a)(1)(B) of such Act), shall provide all       
  students enrolled in a school identified under section 1116(c) with the 
  option to transfer to another public school within the local educational
  agency, including a public charter school, that has not been identified 
  for school improvement under section 1116(c), unless such option to     
  transfer is prohibited by State law, or local law, which includes school
  board-approved local educational agency policy: Provided further , That 
  if the local educational agency demonstrates to the satisfaction of the 
  State educational agency that the local educational agency lacks the    
  capacity to provide all students with the option to transfer to another 
  public school, and after giving notice to the parents of children       
  affected that it is not possible, consistent with State and local law,  
  to accommodate the transfer request of every student, the local         
  educational agency shall permit as many students as possible (who shall 
  be selected by the local educational agency on an equitable basis) to   
  transfer to a public school that has not been identified for school     
  improvement under section 1116(c): Provided further , That up to        
  $3,500,000 of these funds shall be available to the Secretary on October
  1, 2000, to obtain updated local educational agency level census poverty
  data from the Bureau of the Census: Provided further , That             
  $1,364,000,000 shall be available for concentration grants under section
  1124A: Provided further , That grant awards under sections 1124 and     
  1124A of title I of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965  
  shall be not less than the greater of 100 percent of the amount each    
  State and local educational agency received under this authority for    
  fiscal year 2000 or the amount such State and local educational agency  
  would receive if $6,883,503,000 for Basic Grants and $1,222,397,000 for 
  Concentration Grants were allocated in accordance with section          
  1122(c)(3) of title I: Provided further , That notwithstanding any other
  provision of law, grant awards under section 1124A of title I of the    
  Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 shall be made to those   
  local educational agencies that received a Concentration Grant under the
  Department of Education Appropriations Act, 2000, but are not eligible  
  to receive such a grant for fiscal year 2001: Provided further , That   
  the Secretary shall not take into account the hold harmless provisions  
  in this section in determining State allocations under any other program
  administered by the Secretary in any fiscal year: Provided further ,    
  That $8,900,000 shall be available for evaluations under section 1501   
  and not more than $8,500,000 shall be reserved for section 1308, of     
  which not more than $3,000,000 shall be reserved for section 1308(d):   
  Provided further , That $210,000,000 shall be available under section   
  1002(g)(2) to demonstrate effective approaches to comprehensive school  
  reform to be allocated and expended in accordance with the instructions 
  relating to this activity in the statement of the managers on the       
  conference report accompanying Public Law 105 78 and in the statement of
  the managers on the conference report accompanying Public Law 105 277:  
  Provided further , That in carrying out this initiative, the Secretary  
  and the States shall support only approaches that show the most promise 
  of enabling children served by title I to meet challenging State content
  standards and challenging State student performance standards based on  
  reliable research and effective practices, and include an emphasis on   
  basic academics and parental involvement.                               
         * * * * * * *                                                           
             Education Research, Statistics, and Improvement             
     For carrying out activities authorized by the Educational Research,  
  Development, Dissemination, and Improvement Act of 1994, including part 
  E; the National Education Statistics Act of 1994, including sections 411
  and 412; section 2102 of title II, parts A, B, K, and L and sections    
  10102 and 10601 of title X, and part C of title XIII of the Elementary  
  and Secondary Education Act of 1965, as amended, and title VI of Public 
  Law 103 227, $732,721,000: Provided , That of the funds appropriated for
  part A of title X of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965,
  as amended, $5,000,000 shall be made available for a high school reform 
  program of grants to State educational agencies to improve academic     
  performance and provide technical skills training: Provided further ,   
  That of the funds appropriated for part A of title X of the Elementary  
  and Secondary Education Act of 1965, as amended, $5,000,000 shall be    
  made available to carry out part L of title X of the Act: Provided      
  further , That of the amount available for part A of title X of the     
  Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965, as amended, $5,000,000  
  shall be available for grants to State and local educational agencies,  
  in collaboration with other agencies and organizations, for school      
  dropout prevention programs designed to address the needs of populations
  or communities with the highest dropout rates: Provided further , That  
  of the amount made available for part A of title X of the Elementary and
  Secondary Education Act of 1965, as amended, $50,000,000 shall be made  
  available to enable the Secretary of Education to award grants to       
  develop, implement, and strengthen programs to teach American history   
  (not social studies) as a separate subject within school curricula:     
  Provided further , That $53,000,000 of the amount available for the     
  national education research institutes shall be allocated               
  notwithstanding section 912(m)(1)(B F) and subparagraphs (B) and (C) of 
  section 931(c)(2) of Public Law 103 227 and $20,000,000 of that         
  $53,000,000 shall be made available for the Interagency Education       
  Research Initiative: Provided further , That of the funds appropriated  
  for part A of title X of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, as 
  amended, $50,000,000 shall be available to demonstrate effective        
  approaches to comprehensive school reform, to be allocated and expended 
  in accordance with the instructions relating to this activity in the    
  statement of managers on the conference report accompanying Public Law  
  105 78 and in the statement of the managers on the conference report    
  accompanying Public Law 105 277: Provided further , That the funds made 
  available for comprehensive school reform shall become available on July
  1, 2001, and remain available through September 30, 2002, and in        
  carrying out this initiative, the Secretary and the States shall support
  only approaches that show the most promise of enabling children to meet 
  challenging State content standards and challenging State student       
  performance standards based on reliable research and effective          
  practices, and include an emphasis on basic academics and parental      
  involvement: Provided further , That $139,624,000 $139,853,000 of the   
  funds for section 10101 of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of
  1965 shall be available for the projects and in the amounts specified in
  the statement of the managers on the conference report accompanying this
  Act: Provided further , That of the funds appropriated under section    
  10601 of title X of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965, 
  as amended, $2,000,000 shall be used to conduct a violence prevention   
  demonstration program: Provided further , That of the funds available   
  for section 10601 of title X of the Elementary and Secondary Education  
  Act of 1965, as amended, $150,000 shall be awarded to the Center for    
  Educational Technologies to complete production and distribution of an  
  effective CD ROM product that would complement the ``We the People: The 
  Citizen and the Constitution'' curriculum: Provided further , That, of  
  the funds for title VI of Public Law 103 227 and notwithstanding the    
  provisions of section 601(c)(1)(C) of that Act, $1,200,000 shall be     
  available to the Center for Civic Education to conduct a civic education
  program with Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland and,          
  consistent with the civics and Government activities authorized in      
  section 601(c)(3) of Public Law 103 227, to provide civic education     
  assistance to democracies in developing countries. The term ``developing
  countries'' shall have the same meaning as the term ``developing        
  country'' in the Education for the Deaf Act.                            
         * * * * * * *                                                           
           DEPARTMENTS OF VETERANS AFFAIRS AND HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT, AND 
                  INDEPENDENT AGENCIES APPROPRIATIONS ACT, 2001                   
         * * * * * * *                                                           
                                          TITLE III                               
         * * * * * * *                                                           
                              ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY                     
                             STATE AND TRIBAL ASSISTANCE GRANTS                   
      For environmental programs and infrastructure assistance, including  
   capitalization grants for State revolving funds and performance         
   partnership grants, $3,628,740,000 $3,641,341,386, to remain available  
   until expended, of which * * * and that the fiscal year 1999 and any    
   subsequent funds may be used for any required non-federal share of the  
   costs of projects funded by the federal government under section 580 of 
   Public Law 106 53.                                                      
         * * * * * * *                                                           
                       NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION              
                                     HUMAN SPACE FLIGHT                           
      For necessary expenses, not otherwise provided for, in the conduct   
   and support of human space flight research and development activities,  
   including research, development, operations, and services; maintenance; 
   construction of facilities including repair, rehabilitation, and        
   modification of real and personal property, and acquisition or          
   condemnation or real property, as authorized by law; space flight,      
   spacecraft control and communications activities including operations,  
   production, and services; and purchase, lease, charter, maintenance and 
   operation of mission and administrative aircraft, $5,510,900,000, to    
   remain available until September 30, 2001: Provided, That $40,000,000 of
   the amount provided in this paragraph shall be available to the space   
   shuttle program only for preparations necessary to carry out a life and 
   micro-gravity science mission, to be flown between STS 107 and December 
   2001.                                                                   
                                    FULL COMMITTEE VOTES                          
      Pursuant to the provisions of clause 3(b) of rule XIII of the House  
   of Representatives, the results of each rollcall vote on an amendment or
   on the motion to report, together with the names of those voting for and
   those voting against, are printed below:                                
                              rollcall no. 1                             
   Date: June 14, 2001.                                                    
   Measure: Supplemental Appropriations Bill, FY 2001.                     
   Motion by: Ms. DeLauro.                                                 
      Description of motion: To provide $600,000,000 in contingency        
   emergency appropriations to the low-income home energy assistance       
   program, to provide $1.4 billion to the low-income home energy          
   assistance program as an advance appropriation for fiscal year 2002, and
   to reduce the Federal Emergency Management Agency disaster relief       
   rescission by $300,000,000.                                             
   Results: Rejected 29 yeas to 32 nays.                                   
      Members Voting Yea                                                     
       Members Voting Nay                                                     
      Mr. Aderholt                                                            
      Mr. Bonilla                                                             
      Mr. Clyburn                                                             
      Mr. Callahan                                                            
      Mr. Cramer                                                              
      Mr. Cunningham                                                          
      Ms. DeLauro                                                             
      Mr. Doolittle                                                           
      Mr. Dicks                                                               
      Mr. Frelinghuysen                                                       
      Mr. Edwards                                                             
      Mr. Goode                                                               
      Mrs. Emerson                                                            
      Ms. Granger                                                             
      Mr. Farr                                                                
      Mr. Hobson                                                              
      Mr. Fattah                                                              
      Mr. Istook                                                              
      Mr. Hinchey                                                             
      Mr. Kingston                                                            
      Mr. Jackson                                                             
      Mr. Knollenberg                                                         
      Ms. Kaptur                                                              
      Mr. Kolbe                                                               
      Mr. Kennedy                                                             
      Mr. LaHood                                                              
      Ms. Kilpatrick                                                          
      Mr. Latham                                                              
      Mrs. Lowey                                                              
      Mr. Lewis                                                               
      Mrs. Meek                                                               
      Mr. Miller                                                              
      Mr. Mollohan                                                            
      Mr. Nethercutt                                                          
      Mr. Moran                                                               
      Mrs. Northup                                                            
      Mr. Murtha                                                              
      Mr. Regula                                                              
      Mr. Obey                                                                
      Mr. Rogers                                                              
      Mr. Olver                                                               
      Mr. Sherwood                                                            
      Mr. Pastor                                                              
      Mr. Skeen                                                               
      Ms. Pelosi                                                              
      Mr. Sununu                                                              
      Mr. Price                                                               
      Mr. Sweeney                                                             
      Mr. Rothman                                                             
      Mr. Taylor                                                              
      Ms. Roybal-Allard                                                       
      Mr. Tiahrt                                                              
      Mr. Sabo                                                                
      Mr. Vitter                                                              
      Mr. Serrano                                                             
      Mr. Walsh                                                               
      Mr. Visclosky                                                           
      Mr. Wamp Mr. Wicker Mr. Wolf Mr. Young                                  
                                    FULL COMMITTEE VOTES                          
      Pursuant to the provisions of clause 3(b) of rule XIII of the House  
   of Representatives, the results of each roll call vote on an amendment  
   or on the motion to report, together with the names of those voting for 
   and those voting against, are printed below:                            
                              rollcall no. 2                             
   Date: June 13, 2001.                                                    
   Measure: Supplemental Appropriations Bill, FY 2001.                     
   Motion by: Mr. Visclosky.                                               
      Description of motion: To authorize the Secretary of the Army to make
   direct loans and loan guarantees, not exceeding $40,000,000 in          
   aggregate, for improvements at existing non-federal hydropower          
   facilities, to provide $85,000,000 for repairs and improvements to      
   federal hydropower facilities, and to designate these amounts as        
   contingent emergency appropriations.                                    
   Results: Rejected 24 yeas to 31 nays.                                   
      Members Voting Yea                                                     
       Members Voting Nay                                                     
      Mr. Cramer                                                              
      Mr. Aderholt                                                            
      Ms. DeLauro                                                             
      Mr. Callahan                                                            
      Mr. Dicks                                                               
      Mr. Cunningham                                                          
      Mr. Edwards                                                             
      Mr. Doolittle                                                           
      Mr. Farr                                                                
      Mrs. Emerson                                                            
      Mr. Fattah                                                              
      Mr. Frelinghuysen                                                       
      Mr. Hinchey                                                             
      Mr. Hobson                                                              
      Mr. Hoyer                                                               
      Mr. Istook                                                              
      Mr. Jackson                                                             
      Mr. Kingston                                                            
      Ms. Kaptur                                                              
      Mr. Knollenberg                                                         
      Mr. Kennedy                                                             
      Mr. Kolbe                                                               
      Ms. Kilpatrick                                                          
      Mr. LaHood                                                              
      Mrs. Lowey                                                              
      Mr. Latham                                                              
      Mrs. Meek                                                               
      Mr. Lewis                                                               
      Mr. Nethercutt                                                          
      Mr. Miller                                                              
      Mr. Obey                                                                
      Mr. Mollohan                                                            
      Mr. Olver                                                               
      Mr. Murtha                                                              
      Ms. Pelosi                                                              
      Mrs. Northup                                                            
      Mr. Price                                                               
      Mr. Regula                                                              
      Mr. Rothman                                                             
      Mr. Rogers                                                              
      Ms. Roybal-Allard                                                       
      Mr. Sherwood                                                            
      Mr. Sabo                                                                
      Mr. Skeen                                                               
      Mr. Serrano                                                             
      Mr. Sununu                                                              
      Mr. Visclosky                                                           
            Mr. Sweeney Mr. Taylor Mr. Tiahrt Mr. Vitter Mr. Walsh Mr. Wamp   
      Mr. Wicker Mr. Young                                                    
                                    FULL COMMITTEE VOTES                          
      Pursuant to the provisions of clause 3(b) of rule XIII of the House  
   of Representatives, the results of each roll call vote on an amendment  
   or on the motion to report, together with the names of those voting for 
   and those voting against, are printed below:                            
                              rollcall no. 3                             
   Date: June 14, 2001.                                                    
   Measure: Supplemental Appropriations Bill, FY 2001.                     
   Motion by: Mr. Farr.                                                    
      Description of motion: To authorize the Secretary of Energy to make  
   direct loans and loan guarantees, not exceeding $350,000,000 in         
   aggregate, for improvements to existing non-federal electric power      
   transmission systems, and to designate this amount as a contingent      
   emergency appropriation.                                                
   Results: Rejected 24 yeas to 35 nays.                                   
      Members Voting Yea                                                     
       Members Voting Nay                                                     
      Mr. Clyburn                                                             
      Mr. Aderholt                                                            
      Ms. DeLauro                                                             
      Mr. Callahan                                                            
      Mr. Dicks                                                               
      Mr. DeLay                                                               
      Mr. Edwards                                                             
      Mr. Doolittle                                                           
      Mr. Farr                                                                
      Mrs. Emerson                                                            
      Mr. Fattah                                                              
      Mr. Frelinghuysen                                                       
      Mr. Hinchey                                                             
      Mr. Goode                                                               
      Mr. Hoyer                                                               
      Ms. Granger                                                             
      Mr. Jackson                                                             
      Mr. Hobson                                                              
      Ms. Kaptur                                                              
      Mr. Istook                                                              
      Mr. Kennedy                                                             
      Mr. Kingston                                                            
      Ms. Kilpatrick                                                          
      Mr. Knollenberg                                                         
      Mrs. Lowey                                                              
      Mr. Kolbe                                                               
      Mrs. Meek                                                               
      Mr. LaHood                                                              
      Mr. Moran                                                               
      Mr. Latham                                                              
      Mr. Obey                                                                
      Mr. Lewis                                                               
      Mr. Olver                                                               
      Mr. Miller                                                              
      Mr. Pastor                                                              
      Mr. Mollohan                                                            
      Ms. Pelosi                                                              
      Mr. Nethercutt                                                          
      Mr. Price                                                               
      Mrs. Northup                                                            
      Mr. Rothman                                                             
      Mr. Peterson                                                            
      Ms. Roybal-Allard                                                       
      Mr. Regula                                                              
      Mr. Serrano                                                             
      Mr. Rogers                                                              
      Mr. Visclosky                                                           
            Mr. Sherwood Mr. Skeen Mr. Sununu Mr. Sweeney Mr. Taylor Mr.      
      Tiahrt Mr. Vitter Mr. Walsh Mr. Wamp Mr. Wicker Mr. Wolf Mr. Young      
                                    FULL COMMITTEE VOTES                          
      Pursuant to the provisions of clause 3(b) of rule XIII of the House  
   of Representatives, the results of each roll call vote on an amendment  
   or on the motion to report, together with the names of those voting for 
   and those voting against, are printed below:                            
                              rollcall no. 4                             
   Date: June 14, 2001.                                                    
   Measure: Supplemental Appropriations Bill, FY 2001.                     
   Motion by: Mrs. Lowey.                                                  
      Description of motion: to provide $100,000,000 to the Agency for     
   International Development, Child Survival and Disease Programs Fund, to 
   provide $50,000,000 to Development Assistance, to provide $100,000,000  
   to a global trust fund to fight HIV/AIDS, malaria, and tuberculosis, and
   to designate these amounts as contingent emergency appropriations.      
   Results: Rejected 25 yeas to 30 nays.                                   
      Members Voting Yea                                                     
       Members Voting Nay                                                     
      Mr. Boyd                                                                
      Mr. Aderholt                                                            
      Mr. Clyburn                                                             
      Mr. Bonilla                                                             
      Ms. DeLauro                                                             
      Mr. Cunningham                                                          
      Mr. Dicks                                                               
      Mr. Doolittle                                                           
      Mr. Edwards                                                             
      Mrs. Emerson                                                            
      Mr. Farr                                                                
      Mr. Frelinghuysen                                                       
      Mr. Fattah                                                              
      Mr. Goode                                                               
      Mr. Hinchey                                                             
      Ms. Granger                                                             
      Ms. Kaptur                                                              
      Mr. Hobson                                                              
      Mr. Kennedy                                                             
      Mr. Istook                                                              
      Ms. Kilpatrick                                                          
      Mr. Kingston                                                            
      Mrs. Lowey                                                              
      Mr. Knollenberg                                                         
      Mrs. Meek                                                               
      Mr. Kolbe                                                               
      Mr. Mollohan                                                            
      Mr. LaHood                                                              
      Mr. Murtha                                                              
      Mr. Latham                                                              
      Mr. Obey                                                                
      Mr. Lewis                                                               
      Mr. Olver                                                               
      Mr. Miller                                                              
      Mr. Pastor                                                              
      Mr. Nethercutt                                                          
      Ms. Pelosi                                                              
      Mr. Peterson                                                            
      Mr. Price                                                               
      Mr. Regula                                                              
      Mr. Rothman                                                             
      Mr. Rogers                                                              
      Ms. Roybal-Allard                                                       
      Mr. Sherwood                                                            
      Mr. Sabo                                                                
      Mr. Skeen                                                               
      Mr. Serrano                                                             
      Mr. Sununu                                                              
      Mr. Visclosky                                                           
      Mr. Sweeney Mr. Vitter Mr. Walsh Mr. Wamp Mr. Wolf Mr. Young            
                                    FULL COMMITTEE VOTES                          
      Pursuant to the provisions of clause 3(b) of rule XIII of the House  
   of Representatives, the results of each roll call vote on an amendment  
   or on the motion to report, together with the names of those voting for 
   and those voting against, are printed below:                            
                              rollcall no. 5                             
   Date: June 14, 2001.                                                    
   Measure: Supplemental Appropriations Bill, FY 2001.                     
   Motion by: Ms. Kaptur.                                                  
      Description of motion: To provide an additional $35,000,000 for      
   Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Salaries and expenses.      
   Results: Rejected 27 yeas to 35 nays.                                   
      Members Voting Yea                                                     
       Members Voting Nay                                                     
      Mr. Boyd                                                                
      Mr. Aderholt                                                            
      Mr. Clyburn                                                             
      Mr. Bonilla                                                             
      Ms. DeLauro                                                             
      Mr. Callahan                                                            
      Mr. Dicks                                                               
      Mr. Cunningham                                                          
      Mr. Edwards                                                             
      Mr. DeLay                                                               
      Mr. Farr                                                                
      Mr. Doolittle                                                           
      Mr. Fattah                                                              
      Mrs. Emerson                                                            
      Mr. Frelinghuysen                                                       
      Mr. Goode                                                               
      Mr. Hinchey                                                             
      Ms. Granger                                                             
      Mr. Hoyer                                                               
      Mr. Hobson                                                              
      Mr. Jackson                                                             
      Mr. Istook                                                              
      Ms. Kaptur                                                              
      Mr. Kingston                                                            
      Mr. Kennedy                                                             
      Mr. Knollenberg                                                         
      Ms. Kilpatrick                                                          
      Mr. Kolbe                                                               
      Mrs. Lowey                                                              
      Mr. LaHood                                                              
      Mrs. Meek                                                               
      Mr. Latham                                                              
      Mr. Mollohan                                                            
      Mr. Lewis                                                               
      Mr. Obey                                                                
      Mr. Miller                                                              
      Mr. Olver                                                               
      Mr. Murtha                                                              
      Mr. Pastor                                                              
      Mr. Nethercutt                                                          
      Ms. Pelosi                                                              
      Mr. Peterson                                                            
      Mr. Price                                                               
      Mr. Regula                                                              
      Mr. Rothman                                                             
      Mr. Rogers                                                              
      Ms. Roybal-Allard                                                       
      Mr. Sherwood                                                            
      Mr. Sabo                                                                
      Mr. Skeen                                                               
      Mr. Serrano                                                             
      Mr. Sununu                                                              
      Mr. Visclosky                                                           
            Mr. Sweeney Mr. Taylor Mr. Tiahrt Mr. Vitter Mr. Walsh Mr. Wamp   
      Mr. Wicker Mr. Wolf Mr. Young                                           
                                    FULL COMMITTEE VOTES                          
      Pursuant to the provisions of clause 3(b) of rule XIII of the House  
   of Representatives, the results of each roll vote on an amendment or on 
   the motion to report, together with the names of those voting for and   
   those voting against, are printed below:                                
                              RollCall No. 6                             
   Date: June 14, 2001.                                                    
   Measure: Supplemental Appropriations Bill, FY 2001.                     
   Motion by: Ms. Pelosi.                                                  
      Description of motion: To require the Federal Energy Regulatory      
   Commission to impose ``cost-of-service'' limits on the price of         
   wholesale electricity sold in the Western region for the next two years.
   Results: Rejected 27 yeas to 34 nays.                                   
      Members Voting Yea                                                     
       Members Voting Nay                                                     
      Mr. Boyd                                                                
      Mr. Aderholt                                                            
      Mr. Clyburn                                                             
      Mr. Bonilla                                                             
      Ms. DeLauro                                                             
      Mr. Callahan                                                            
      Mr. Dicks                                                               
      Mr. Cunningham                                                          
      Mr. Farr                                                                
      Mr. DeLay                                                               
      Mr. Fattah                                                              
      Mr. Doolittle                                                           
      Mr. Hinchey                                                             
      Mr. Edwards                                                             
      Mr. Hoyer                                                               
      Mrs. Emerson                                                            
      Mr. Jackson                                                             
      Mr. Frelinghuysen                                                       
      Ms. Kaptur                                                              
      Mr. Goode                                                               
      Mr. Kennedy                                                             
      Ms. Granger                                                             
      Ms. Kilpatrick                                                          
      Mr. Hobson                                                              
      Mrs. Lowey                                                              
      Mr. Istook                                                              
      Mrs. Meek                                                               
      Mr. Kingston                                                            
      Mr. Mollohan                                                            
      Mr. Knollengberg                                                        
      Mr. Moran                                                               
      Mr. Kolbe                                                               
      Mr. Murtha                                                              
      Mr. LaHood                                                              
      Mr. Obey                                                                
      Mr. Latham                                                              
      Mr. Olver                                                               
      Mr. Lewis                                                               
      Mr. Pastor                                                              
      Mr. Miller                                                              
      Ms. Pelosi                                                              
      Mr. Nethercutt                                                          
      Mr. Price                                                               
      Mr. Peterson                                                            
      Mr. Rothman                                                             
      Mr. Regula                                                              
      Ms. Roybal-Allard                                                       
      Mr. Sherwood                                                            
      Mr. Sabo                                                                
      Mr. Skeen                                                               
      Mr. Serrano                                                             
      Mr. Sununu                                                              
      Mr. Visclosky                                                           
            Mr. Sweeney Mr. Tiahrt Mr. Vitter Mr. Walsh Mr. Wamp Mr. Wicker   
      Mr. Wolf Mr. Young                                                      
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                             DISSENTING VIEWS OF HON. DAVID OBEY                  
      The problems facing Americans today are in some respects quite       
   different from those the country faced last fall when Appropriations    
   were enacted for the current fiscal year. With gasoline prices up as    
   much as 50 cents a gallon, a two car family can expect to pay about $600
   dollars a year more to the oil companies and they will be paying a      
   similar increase in heating and electrical costs. This is about a       
   thousand or so dollars per household that won't be available for        
   replacing the family car, buying new clothes or saving for college      
   education. As a result many businesses are suffering and the whole      
   economy has gotten softer.                                              
      While higher energy prices have affected households in every part of 
   the United States, the impact on the West Coast has been much more      
   severe. Many Americans in other parts of the United States are still not
   aware of how serious the situation is in the West and how much it may   
   impact the overall national economy. Because more than one in eight     
   Americans live in the three West Coast states and because so much of our
   export oriented and high tech industries are concentrated in those      
   states, serious economic disruptions on the coast are certain to have a 
   big impact on the economies of virtually all of the 47 other states.    
      Ironically, this supplemental is before the Congress largely because 
   of energy problems. When fuel prices rise, the cost of flying planes,   
   fueling ships and driving tanks also goes up and the military needs more
   money. This bill at least partially addresses those costs. (Many who    
   follow the defense budget in detail, however, believe that the armed    
   services may still have to scale back training, maintenance and other   
   activities in the final months of the fiscal year because of our failure
   to fully offset these higher fuel costs.)                               
      But the major failing of this Supplemental is that it does not       
   address the energy crisis with respect to any other segment of the      
   society or the American economy. It does not take a number of simple and
   straightforward steps that could be critical in boosting the near term  
   availability of electrical power, protecting consumers from the extreme 
   price gouging occurring in some segments of the industry and insulating 
   the American economy from further damage from rising energy prices.     
   Finally, it does far less than is necessary to protect low income and   
   elderly households from the devastating impact that high-energy prices  
   have on their ability to afford food, medicine and other necessities.   
                            The Energy Problem                           
      Fluctuations in the cost of energy have played a major role in the   
   performance of the American economy since the early 1970s. Rising fuel  
   prices have contributed to at least three recessions over the last three
   decades and falling fuel prices have caused dislocations and            
   bankruptcies in our own energy producing states and wreaked serious     
   havoc with the entire international financial system.                   
      The current situation differs from those of the past in that it is   
   caused not only by an imbalance between the demand and supply of fossil 
   fuels but also by serious emerging structural problems in the industries
   that generate and transmit electricity. While California and the West   
   Coast provide the most obvious examples of these problems they are not  
   strictly West Coast problems.                                           
      The deregulation and restructuring of the electrical utility industry
   that began more than a decade ago has left investors with considerable  
   uncertainty as to how far deregulation will eventually go and how       
   competitive the market for electricity will be. As a result there has   
   been little growth in capacity for either generating or transmitting    
   electrical power even though the economy has grown at a remarkable pace 
   for most of that same period. As demand for electricity began to        
   approach the capacity to generate it some producers came to realize that
   by withholding output they could force significantly higher prices in   
   the newly deregulated environment. As a result, consumers are faced with
   a market that is neither competitive nor regulated.                     
      There are three fundamental reasons that this problem is more severe 
   in California and on the West Coast. First, California's attempt at     
   deregulation was particularly inept. Wholesale prices were unleashed    
   while retail prices remained regulated. That worked only as long as the 
   price of the oil and natural gas used for generating electricity        
   continued to fall. Once oil and gas                                     
                    prices began to rise, retail suppliers were caught in an      
          untenable squeeze and consumers were given no incentive to conserve.    
      Second, the national power grid has never had significant capacity to
   transmit electricity from east of the Rockies to California and the West
   Coast. As a result, there is much less competition in the wholesale     
   electricity market in the West than in other parts of the country.      
      Third, the West has relied more heavily on hydroelectric power than  
   most other parts of the country. Hydroelectric power is dependent on    
   rainfall and the Pacific Northwest where most of the dams are located   
   has been suffering from a severe drought.                               
      The combination of these factors has produced not only dramatic      
   increases in the price of electricity but also in blackouts that        
   jeopardize production and profitability in a wide array of industries.  
   Producers are typically charging between 10 and 30 times the historical 
   rate for electricity and in some instances they have been able to charge
   as much as 129 times the historical rate. Typical homeowners in many    
   parts of the state have seen their monthly electricity bills go from    
   $100 to more than $800. In some communities more than half of all small 
   businesses are either in bankruptcy or in the process of applying for   
   bankruptcy protection. A significant number of larger employers have    
   actually shut down operations. In total, electricity costs in California
   have gone from $7 billion a year to around $70 billion. Even in a state 
   with a trillion dollar a year economy, that is a huge diversion of GDP  
   from other sectors of the economy to the utility companies.             
      That means that states like Wisconsin that produce capital goods have
   seen their California markets evaporate and now have surplus            
   inventories. States like Michigan, Ohio and Missouri are seeing layoffs 
   in the automobile industry. Sales are off in the publishing, recording  
   and household products industries largely because of the bite the       
   electricity market in California is taking out of that state's ability  
   to grow and consume products from other parts of the United States.     
                            what can be done?                            
      The United States faces both short-term and long-term problems with  
   respect to energy. Under existing technologies our growing economy      
   requires more and more energy, makes us more and more dependent on oil  
   from the Persian Gulf, and therefore inevitably more vulnerable to      
   political disruptions in that part of the world. At the same time it    
   increases air and water pollution and jeopardizes the global climate.   
   Finding ways to reduce our consumption of energy will help control      
   prices, improve the quality of our air and water and reduce the         
   vulnerability of our economy to events in Southwest Asia. Finding       
   alternative forms of energy will also help achieve all three of those   
   objectives. Those activities require the kind of long term and high-risk
   investments that the private sector is not likely to undertake and they 
   should be funded in our regular appropriation bills as the high priority
   investments that any sensible assessment of our economic and security   
   needs indicate they deserve.                                            
      But the electricity crisis could do serious damage to our current    
   prosperity if we do not take action now for short-term remedies. The    
   Democratic members of the Appropriations Committee put forward a series 
   of such initiatives when the Committee met to consider this Supplemental
   on June 14th. Action on this legislation had been delayed for months    
   based on the President's decision not to send forward a budget request  
   until the Congress had completed action on the tax bill. As a result    
   remedies to the energy crisis that could be underway are only now being 
   considered. Unfortunately, even when the Supplemental budget request    
   finally did reach the Committee, Republican Congressional leaders       
   maintained rigid discipline in dissuading committee members of their    
   party from supporting these proposals. As a result none were adopted.   
   That is deeply disturbing since this Supplemental is the single best    
   and--perhaps only--legislative vehicle that can put resources to use    
   this summer in mitigating the crisis.                                   
      There were four separate amendments presented to the committee, each 
   dealing with a separate portion of the energy crisis.                   
       Temporary cost-of-service price limits in Western states (Roll Call 
   #6);                                                                    
       $350 million for national electric power grid improvement loans     
   (Roll Call #3);                                                         
       $125 million for national hydroelectric power improvement loans     
   (Roll Call #2); and                                                     
       $600 million in fiscal year 2001 and $1.4 billion in fiscal year    
   2002 for increased emergency funding for the Low-Income Home Energy     
   Assistance Program (LIHEAP) (Roll Call #1).                             
           Temporary Cost-of-Service Price Limits (Roll Call #6)                   
      It is essential to address the price-limit issue on this emergency   
   supplemental appropriations funding bill. No one disagrees that the     
   current wholesale energy market in the West is dysfunctional. Wholesale 
   spot-market electricity rates that used to be around $30 per megawatt   
   hour in the past have ranged between $200 and $300 a megawatt hour this 
   spring, with typical peaks as high as $1,000 per megawatt hour.         
      Federal Energy Regulation Commission (FERC) orders issued to date    
   this year put in place market-based limits and close loopholes which    
   previously allowed energy generators to avoid FERC regulation, for      
   example by shipping power out-of-state and then reimporting it during   
   emergencies at unreasonable prices. FERC orders to date, however, do not
   prohibit all energy providers from overcharging since FERC still uses   
   market-based instead of cost-of-service based rates. Recent FERC orders 
   to date do not effectively rectiviy overcharges that have occurred since
   June 2000, nor compel refunds in cases where prices have not been fair  
   and reasonable.                                                         
      During this past year, while ordinary citizens and small businesses  
   were suffering, a few energy generators and energy marketers made record
   high profits on the backs of the Western states. On June 5, Duke Energy 
   confirmed that it sold electricity in California for as much as $3,880 a
   megawatt hour (129 times the historical rate)--double the rate that     
   Governor Grey Davis cited as an ``obscene'' example of price gouging.   
      In May, 41 Member of Congress introduced H.R. 1468, the Energy Price 
   and Economic Stability Act of 2001. The bill has two main features: (1) 
   It sets a temporary limit for wholesale energy prices in the Western    
   United States at a cost-of-service (rather than a market based) rate, to
   include a reasonable risk premium or a return on invested capital; and  
   (2) it allows States which are charged unjust and unreasonable          
   electricity rates since June 1, 2000 to obtain refunds, if they are     
   successful in bringing action in U.S. district court. The bill's        
   provisions expire in March, 2003. The price limits in this amendment are
   essential to stabilizing the power market in Western states until       
   sufficient supply can be brought on-line to allow competitive market    
   forces to ensure fair and reasonable prices.                            
      H.R. 1468 is a very reasonable, moderate, flexible, and temporary    
   response to the severe energy crisis in the Western states. The         
   amendment proposed by Democrats an amendment to this supplemental       
   appropriations bill would simple enact H.R. 1468 as part of the larger  
   bill, to provide immediate temporary relief to millions of American     
   citizens in a number of Western states. A senior Republican leader said 
   when the amendment was offered that ``California made its bed, and now  
   California should sleep in it''. The Majority voted along party lines to
   reject it (Roll Call #6).                                               
           Electric Power Grid Improvement Loans (Roll Call #3).                   
      Electricity competition has led to significant changes in the        
   operation of the bulk power grid (the powers plants and high-voltage    
   transmissions facilities that make up the wholesale power market). More 
   and more electricity is being shipped longer distances over a           
   transmission system that was originally designed only to provide limited
   power and reserve-sharing among neighboring utilities.                  
      Competition in electricity has already dramatically increased the    
   movement of power within and between regions of the country. Over the   
   next ten years, the Department of Energy predicts that demand for       
   electric power will increase by 25 percent, and more than 200,000       
   megawatts of new capacity will be required. However, under current plans
   electric transmission capacity will not be nearly enough to keep pace.  
   This shortage could lead to serious transmission congestion and electric
   reliability problems. Regional shortages of generating capacity and the 
   increasing stress placed on the existing transmission system are        
   combining today to reduce the overall reliability of electric supply in 
   the country and are reducing the quality of power delivered to          
   end-users.                                                              
      The best example of how this has developed into an emergency         
   situation is Path 15 in California, which consists of two 84-mile 500   
   kilovolt transmission lines between the northern and southern parts of  
   the state. There is consensus that Path 15 is a major bottleneck which  
   contributes to blackouts in the state. Between April, 1998 and January, 
   2001 there were 226 incidents where the flow on Path 15 exceeded the    
   south-to-north stability limits. As a result, electricity was diverted  
   to other transmission                                                   
                    lines and routed through Nevada and Oregon. The California    
          Independent System operator concluded that for the period between       
          September 1999 and December 2000 congestion on Path 15 cost consumers   
          $222 million.                                                           
      California utilities would like to add a third transmission line     
   along the existing path at an approximate cost of $250 million to       
   increase transfer capability by approximately 1,500 megawatts. The      
   Secretary of Energy recently testified before the Committee that        
   constructing the third Path 15 line would increase transmission system  
   reliability, reduce the likelihood of blackouts, and lead to greater    
   competition and lower prices. Unfortunately, due to the recent energy   
   crisis, California utilities that are in very poor financial condition  
   have no means to undertake such a project at this time.                 
      The Secretary of Energy also recently testified that the electric    
   price spikes in the Midwest in the summer of 1998 were caused in part by
   transmission constraints limiting the ability of the region to import   
   electricity from other regions of the country with available electric   
   power. During the summer of 2000, cool weather in the Midwest and hot   
   temperatures in the deep South created a heavy north-to-south flow of   
   lower-cost, efficient Midwestern electricity to serve air conditioning  
   loads. However, because the transmission system was unable to           
   accommodate the heavy loads, the South had to turn on inefficient, older
   generation units. The Secretary also testified that transmission        
   constraints have been a persistent cause of price spikes in New York in 
   recent years.                                                           
      The obsolescence of the nation's electric power transmission grid has
   become an emergency that requires immediate attention. The problem is   
   not one limited to just California, or even the Western states: it is   
   clearly a national problem that potentially affects all citizens. To    
   address it does not mean that there has to be a Federal ownership or    
   operational role in local or regional power transmission. A loan program
   can provide the up-front cash to accelerate projects around the country 
   that will quickly lead to improved, lower-cost, and more efficient power
   transmission. As upgraded or new power lines or systems are used, the   
   recipients of loans can reimburse the government over time in a manner  
   that minimizes burden on local communities yet fully recoups the cost of
   the government's loan which in the long term would be zero.             
      The Democrats proposed an amendment to this bill to allow the        
   Secretary of Energy to provide $350 million in loans to states,         
   companies, and other outdated equipment would improve system reliability
   by reducing the number of generators going out of service and improve   
   generator efficiency.                                                   
      In the Pacific Northwest, up to 70 percent of electricity is         
   generated from hydropower. A continued lack of funding has reduced the  
   Corps' ability to sustain the reliability of its hydropower production  
   at its facilities in the Pacific Northwest which are essential for      
   providing power in the Western states. Facilities in Oregon, Washington,
   and Idaho have a backlog of repair items affecting not only the power   
   plant facilities, but also associated dam and reservoir maintenance to  
   assure continued safety and environmental protection including fish     
   habitat. The Army Corps of Engineers needs $45 million to repair        
   earthquake damage to hydropower facilities and to correct major         
   environmental deficiencies in the Pacific Northwest in the states of    
   Washington and Oregon. Performance of this maintenance would also       
   increase power generation reliability through use of modern technology. 
      The Democrats proposed an amendment for $125,000,000 as follows: up  
   to $40 million for loans to operators of non-federal dams for energy    
   efficiency improvements, $45 million for repairs and improvements to    
   dams in the Pacific Northwest, and $40 million for repairs and upgrades 
   to dams operated by the Army Corps of Engineers or the Bureau of        
   Reclamation within the Department of the Interior. None of these funds  
   could be used in a manner which increases environmental damage above    
   current levels.                                                         
   The Majority voted along party lines to reject it (Roll Call #2).       
           Low-Income Home Energy Assistance (Roll Call #1)                        
      Whether it is families in the Northeast that heat their homes with   
   fuel oil, families that use natural gas in the Midwest, or families     
   using electricity in California and the West, nearly every family in    
   America has experienced the shock of receiving a heating or cooling bill
   double or triple the amount they paid the year before. For example,     
   residential heating oil prices were 48 percent higher in November 2000  
   than in November 1999, and residential natural gas prices in the fourth 
   quarter of 2000 were 44 percent above the previous year.                
      These extraordinary energy price hikes have hurt our senior citizens 
   and low-income families the most. They already struggle to heat and cool
   their                                                                   
                    organizations for improvements to existing electric power     
          transmission systems. The Majority voted along party lines to reject it.
           Hydroelectric Power Improvements (Roll Call #2)                         
      Hydropower is a low-cost renewable resource producing no airborne    
   emissions that contribute to acid rain or the greenhouse effect.        
   Hydropower is the nation's leading renewable energy source, accounting  
   for 81 percent of the nation's total renewable energy generation, and is
   considered to be the least environmentally damaging major source of     
   power. The United States is one of the largest producers of hydropower  
   in the world, second only to Canada. Hydropower ranges between 10 to 12 
   percent of U.S. electrical generation. Without hydropower, the United   
   States would have to burn an additional 126 million tons of coal, 25    
   million barrels of oil, and 452 billion cubic feet of natural gas       
   annually. Simply increasing the efficiency of the nation's existing     
   hydroelectric equipment by one percent would result in an increase in   
   annual power generation of about 3.3 billion kilowatt hours. A 1998     
   Department of Energy report suggests that our nation has the ability to 
   generate up to 4,316 megawatts of additional electric power by upgrading
   equipment at hydroelectric facilities now operating.                    
      There are non-Federal dams in all 50 States at 2,162 sites. Some     
   non-federal owners of hydroelectric dams continue to operate turbines   
   that were installed more than a century ago.                            
      The Army Corps of Engineers has 75 hydropower facilities throughout  
   the country that account for about 24 percent of the hydroelectric power
   capacity and about 3 percent of electric power in the nation, making the
   Army Corps the 4th largest utility in the nation. The backlog of        
   maintenance for these facilities is $400 million.                       
      At a recent hearing conducted by the Subcommittee on Energy and      
   Water, the Chief of the Army Corps of Engineers testified that many of  
   the Corps' 75 hydroelectric dam power plants have generating equipment  
   that is 30 to 40 years old which is in need of upgrade or replacement.  
   The Chief further testified that the Corps had $23.7 million of         
   hydropower critical maintenance backlogs that threaten efficient power  
   generation of dams in Arkansas, Georgia, Idaho, Missouri, Montana, North
   Dakota, Nebraska, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Virginia. Repair   
   and replacement of homes, put food on the table, buy medicines, and meet
   other basic necessities. Recent estimates show that this fiscal year    
   low-income families will pay, on average, about $1,530 for annual       
   residential energy costs or about 20 percent of their annual income--a  
   burden four times higher than the average 5 percent of annual income    
   paid by other families. Extraordinary energy bills are taking their toll
   on these vulnerable families and senior citizens.                       
      For years, the Low-Income Home Energy Assistance Program (LIHEAP) has
   been one of the few critical lifelines for our most vulnerable seniors  
   and families to deal with energy costs. But with record high energy     
   prices, it is more important now than ever. Nearly 80 percent of LIHEAP 
   recipients have incomes at or below the federal poverty level ($17,650) 
   and about a third of LIHEAP households include at least one elderly     
   person in the household. Another 29 percent of LIHEAP families have a   
   child age 5 years or under, and 30 percent of LIHEAP households have at 
   least 1 person who is unable to work due to disability.                 
      Unfortunately, in recent years, we have seen the regular LIHEAP      
   appropriation drop from a high of $2.1 billion in 1986 to $1.4 billion  
   today, The number of households that receive assistance under LIHEAP has
   declined from 7.1 million when the program first began--serving 36      
   percent of the total eligible population--to only 5 million             
   today--serving only 17 percent of the eligible population at a time of  
   the highest energy prices in recent years. Community action agencies    
   throughout the nation that administer LIHEAP report having to turn away 
   hundreds of eligible clients because of lack of resources. In all, 20   
   states including Wisconsin, Alabama, California, Georgia, Kentucky,     
   Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Massachusetts, Minnesota, New Mexico, New York  
   and Rhode Island have exhausted or nearly exhausted their LIHEAP        
   funding. And, those who are fortunate enough to get LIHEAP assistance   
   receive only enough to pay about one quarter of their total residential 
   energy bill.                                                            
      The $150 million requested by the President and the $300 million     
   included in this bill by the majority are grossly inadequate to respond 
   to this detrimental decline in LIHEAP funding. If LIHEAP served the same
   proportion (36 percent) of eligible seniors and low-income families that
   it served twenty years ago at a benefit level commensurate with recent  
   energy price increases, the fiscal year 2001 LIHEAP appropriation would 
   need to be $4.6 billion--$2.3 billion more than the (regular and        
   emergency) resources                                                    
                    currently available. The Democratic Amendment offered by Mrs. 
          DeLauro would have enacted an immediate $600 million emergency          
          appropriation for LIHEAP while also providing a $1.4 billion fiscal year
          2002 appropriation for the regular LIHEAP block grant to ensure that    
          energy assistance to poor families is not disrupted this fall in the    
          event that the enactment of the fiscal year 2002 Labor-HHS-Education    
          bill is delayed beyond the start of the new fiscal year. This amendment 
          was a much more appropriate response to this funding shortfall than     
          either the White House or Republican Leadership, but was rejected by the
          majority by a vote of 29:32.                                            
      The Democratic amendment (Roll Call #1) to provide an additional $600
   million for LIHEAP would have accomplished several purposes. First--it  
   would have extended energy assistance to an additional 1 million        
   low-income senior citizens. Second, the amendment would have provided   
   the funds needed to prevent utility shut offs for thousands of families 
   with unpaid bills from this past winter. Third, the amendment would have
   provided a cushion to take care of any heat emergencies this summer.    
   Fourth, the amendment would have provided for any unforeseen energy     
   emergencies such as the flooding that occurred last week in Texas and   
   Louisiana, which may create an additional need for energy assistance.   
   Fifth, by providing supplemental funding now, the Democratic amendment  
   would have enabled states to stretch available LIHEAP resources by      
   purchasing heating fuel in the summer months when it is the cheapest.   
   Finally, the amendment would have provided a $1.4 billion FY 2002       
   appropriation for the regular LIHEAP block grant, ensuring no           
   interruption in the delivery of critical energy assistance to needy     
   families this fall.                                                     
      As the energy crisis continues and more families and seniors go      
   without adequate LIHEAP assistance, utility companies across the country
   are reporting huge increases in arrearages. Survey results from 19      
   states show a total of $910 million owed in May 2001 for unpaid utility 
   bills by 4.3 million families. A tally for all 50 states could easily be
   $2 billion or more in outstanding utility bills. For instance:          
       In California, Southern California Gas experienced a 96 percent     
   increase in delinquencies among its residential customers from February 
   2000 to February 2001, and arrearages increased from $51 million to $100
   million, with over half a million customers in arrearage.               
       Georgia reported 200,000 families owing $80 million in arrearages   
   and facing disconnections.                                              
       Iowa reported 180,000 families owing more than $34.5 million, more  
   than double last years amount.                                          
       Kentucky reported $31 million in natural gas arrearages with 94,000 
   pending shutoffs.                                                       
    Michigan reported 1.3 million customers with $98 million in arrearages.
       In New Jersey, the state's largest utility has sent out shut off    
   notices to 276,000 families with arrearages of $271 million.            
       Pennsylvania reported between 150,000 and 200,000 families in       
   arrears. Pennsylvania utilities report a 64 percent increase in people  
   with outstanding heating bills.                                         
       Entergy Texas reported a 41 percent increase in arrearages from $7.3
   million to $10.3 million.                                               
       In Wisconsin, nearly 500,000 households were in arrears on electric 
   and gas utility bills, with $98 million owed--an increase of 38 percent 
   over last year.                                                         
      Following these Minority Views, we have attached (1) a table         
   displaying the number and percentage of eligible households served by   
   LIHEAP in each state, (2) a survey conducted by the National Energy     
   Assistance Directors' Association summarizing the funding status of     
   LIHEAP in the states, and (3) information provided by the National      
   Energy Assistance Directors' Association on utility arrearages in 19    
   states and the District of Columbia.                                    
                  Other Problems with this supplemental                  
           A ``Puzzling'' Rescession: FEMA (Roll Call #1)                          
      This supplemental appropriations bill takes funds from several       
   critical items in order to offset other funding within this bill. First,
   the bill rescinds $389 million from the Federal Emergency's Management  
   Agency's Disaster Relief Fund. The rationale provided is that since     
   there is close to two billion dollars currently in the Fund, a $389     
   million rescission will still leave enough funds to future disasters.   
   The fact is, however, that these disaster assistance dollars, both for  
   disaster victims and for public facilities such as                      
                    repair of roads and bridges, are already earmarked for        
          previous disasters or for projected disasters. When these funds are     
          needed, this proposed rescission could preclude prompt assistance to    
          individuals or municipalities affected by a disaster. Additionally, the 
          Administration, in their response to the proposed supplemental          
          appropriations bill states, ``* * * we are puzzled by the proposed      
          rescission of $389 million in disaster relief funds for the Federal     
          Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). The rescission would eliminate much 
          of the normal FEMA funding needed by the agency to provide quick and    
          effective assistance to disaster-stricken communities and victims,      
          should such action be requested in the future * * *'' Given the latest  
          storm, Tropical Storm Allison, which is larger than the ``average''     
          disaster, this is not the time to be rescinding funds from FEMA's       
          Disaster Relief Fund.                                                   
           HUD                                                                     
      Second, this bill rescinds $114.3 million from the Department of     
   Housing and Urban Development's Housing Certificate Fund. At this time, 
   $114.3 million from this account is not available in fiscal year 2001   
   and interfering with this fund threatens HUD's ability to assist        
   low-income individuals. These recaptured funds are excess funds that are
   more than one year old. HUD officials cannot be certain that there will 
   be sufficient excess funds to rescind. Because this rescission must come
   from this account only, the only option is for HUD to take $114.3       
   million from reserves. Taking funds from HUD reserves or having this    
   rescission in any way affect low-income people is unacceptable.         
           Job training                                                            
      The bill rescinds $359 million from FY 2002 advance appropriations   
   for job training formula grants. This rescission is unwise, ill-timed,  
   and damaging. It takes back funds which states and localities are       
   already counting on for use during the job training program year        
   beginning on July 1, 2001--just two weeks from now. The rescission      
   represents and 11 percent cut for adult job training and a 16 percent   
   cut in programs to aid workers dislocated by plant closings and mass    
   layoffs. With unemployment and layoffs rising, this is exactly the wrong
   time to be cutting back on programs that assist unemployed workers      
   obtain the skills training and job search assistance they need to find  
   new, decent-paying jobs.                                                
      The rationale given by the Committee for this rescission is that     
   balances of unexpended funds held by state and local job training       
   agencies have apparently been growing during the current year. However, 
   the main reason for this growth in unexpended balances is delays caused 
   by the need to revamp local programs and governing bodies to conform to 
   the new federal authorizing law, the Workforce Investment Act, which    
   took effect last July 1. There is no reason to believe that the need for
   job training services has diminished, or that programs will not return  
   to their normal expenditure rates once the transition to the Workforce  
   Investment Act is over. We should not be telling local job training     
   agencies to overhaul their programs in response to new federal law, and 
   then penalize them with a rescission when that transition produces some 
   spending delays.                                                        
           Highway Emergency Relief Funding                                        
      The highway emergency relief program pays for the costs of fixing    
   roads and bridges damaged by floods, earthquakes and other natural      
   disasters. The FY 2001 Transportation Appropriations Act contained $720 
   million in emergency funding for this program. That funding, plus the   
   $100 million in mandatory funding this program receives each year, has  
   all been allocated to states to pay for previous disasters. Today, there
   is no funding available for this program and there is a $33 million     
   backlog of requirements from natural disasters that occurred this fiscal
   year--the earthquake in the state of Washington, ice storms in the      
   states of Texas and Oklahoma, and a flood in Puerto Rico. Estimates are 
   not yet available for the damage done from the most recent flooding in  
   Texas. The Federal Highway Administration could borrow from other       
   accounts to pay for these emergency needs, but the only funding not     
   allocated to the states already is for the Transportation Infrastructure
   Financing credit program and only $44 million is currently available. It
   is highly unlikely that this $44 million would last through the end of  
   this fiscal year. Additional emergency funding of at least $100 million 
   for this program should have been included in this emergency            
   supplemental appropriations bill. The majority erred in not properly    
   addressing this emergency requirement.                                  
           Winter Olympics                                                         
      Democrats are also concerned with the Administration's and the       
   Majority's failure to provide adequate security for the 2002 Salt Lake  
   City Winter Olympics on a timely basis. In August 1999, the Secret      
   Service was given responsibility for designing, planning, and           
   implementing security for the 2002 Games. In addition, several Treasury 
   law enforcement agencies will provide personnel in support of the       
   effort. However, the President did not request any additional funding in
   fiscal year 2002 for Treasury agencies to cover these costs. Recognizing
   this error, the Administration subsequently requested an additional     
   $60.6 million as part of the supplemental funding request, but the      
   Majority chose not to include the required funding in this bill. Given  
   the unrealistic allocations required by the Majority's budget           
   resolution, it is not clear if and how this requirement can be          
   accommodated in the fiscal year 2002 bill. Effective security is key to 
   a successful Olympics, and the Majority needs to ensure that sufficient 
   funding is available for Treasury law enforcement agencies. It was a    
   mistake not to provide funding for Winter Olympics in this bill.        
                                CONCLUSION                               
      It is a shame that this emergency supplemental appropriations bill   
   contains nothing of substance to address the immediate needs of American
   citizens who face a national energy crisis according to the President.  
   The citizens in Western States will endure more hardship as the summer  
   unfolds. Democrats offer national initiatives for real near-term        
   solutions that could be implemented quickly on a bipartisan basis. It is
   unfortunate that Republicans reject such proposals, and instead have    
   produced this supplemental appropriations bill that fails to respond to 
   the national energy crisis in any meaningful way.                       
                      LOW-INCOME HOME ENERGY ASSISTANCE PROGRAM                      
             [Estimated number and percent of households served, FY 2001]            
                  State     Households served      Households not served      Elderly not served     
                              Number    Percent        Number     Percent       Number    Percent  
Alabama*                      41,468        8.3       460,343        91.7      197,197       42.8  
Alaska                         7,500       13.4        48,271        86.6        8,740       18.1  
Arizona                       25,000        5.5       433,425        94.5      149,349       34.5  
Arkansas                      70,000       22.6       239,354        77.4      109,530       45.8  
California*                  123,280        3.4     3,466,979        96.6    1,129,586       32.6  
Colorado*                     75,000       21.9       267,962        78.1       87,355       32.6  
Connecticut                   68,000       16.6       342,270        83.4      158,525       46.3  
Delaware                      11,000       14.4        65,591        85.6       32,213       49.1  
District of Columbia*         15,000       21.0        56,562        79.0       24,077       42.6  
Florida                       42,500        2.6     1,583,788        97.4      726,918       45.9  
Georgia*                     120,000       15.2       666,893        84.8      190,696       28.6  
Hawaii                         5,300        4.2       121,891        95.8       48,041       39.4  
Idaho                         30,930       26.0        88,089        74.0       31,341       35.6  
Illinois*                    350,000       27.9       903,643        72.1      518,146       57.3  
Indiana                      121,370       21.1       454,085        78.9      229,338       50.5  
Iowa*                         80,000       28.9       196,391        71.1       80,817       41.2  
Kansas*                       25,000        9.2       247,736        90.8      108,081       43.6  
Kentucky*                    209,748       49.9       210,262        50.1      148,569       70.7  
Louisiana                     92,100       18.6       403,885        81.4      183,634       45.5  
Maine*                        58,000       48.3        62,079        51.7       33,913       54.6  
Maryland*                     70,000       14.5       411,806        85.5      192,534       46.8  
Massachusetts*               123,000       16.3       632,770        83.7          n/a        n/a  
Michigan                     362,000       34.7       680,702        65.3      298,029       43.8  
Minnesota*                   107,000       23.6       346,129        76.4      163,569       47.3  
Mississippi                   39,750       11.9       295,084        88.1      102,676       34.8  
Missouri                     110,198       20.2       435,361        79.8      187,986       43.2  
Montana*                      17,500       18.1        79,340        81.9       24,600       31.0  
Nebraska*                     25,500       14.5       150,542        85.5       74,936       49.8  
Nevada                         8,700        5.3       156,313        94.7       57,679       36.9  
New Hampshire*                27,500       23.7        88,777        76.3       47,405       53.4  
New Jersey                   150,000       16.6       754,349        83.4      391,625       51.9  
New Mexico*                   48,000       25.5       140,568        74.5       51,558       36.7  
New York*                    818,000       35.1     1,513,183        64.9      724,283       47.9  
North Carolina               151,000       17.7       702,356        82.3      292,147       41.6  
North Dakota                  14,000       18.5        61,632        81.5       27,714       45.0  
Ohio                         224,700       18.1     1,014,102        81.9      421,052       41.5  
Oklahoma                      86,000       24.4       266,521        75.6      105,912       39.7  
Oregon                        88,547       27.1       238,533        72.9       77,856       32.6  
Pennsylvania                 280,750       20.5     1,086,783        79.5      558,902       51.4  
Rhode Island*                 26,000       20.3       101,855        79.7       67,565       66.3  
South Carolina                64,755       15.1       362,711        84.9      140,244       38.7  
South Dakota                  15,000       20.5        58,316        79.5       23,202       39.8  
Tennessee                     95,630       15.7       511,809        84.3      179,386       35.0  
Texas                         53,459        2.5     2,050,915        97.5      690,490       33.7  
Utah*                         30,000       21.9       106,844        78.1       32,988       30.9  
Vermont                       23,900       39.2        37,079        60.8       19,723       53.2  
Virginia                      83,518       12.8       571,146        87.2      227,810       39.9  
Washington                    75,000       14.6       438,476        85.4      130,032       29.7  
West Virginia                 55,000       23.2       182,397        76.8       90,696       49.7  
Wisconsin*                   110,100       22.5       378,737        77.5      176,561       46.6  
Wyoming                       10,000       19.5        41,395        80.5       18,258       44.1  
                         -----------  ---------  ------------  ----------  -----------  ---------  
Total                      4,965,703       17.0    24,216,030        83.0    9,793,484       40.4  
*These states have depleted or nearly depleted their FY 2001 LIHEAP allocations, according to the National Energy Assistance Directors' Association.  
*Source: National Energy Assistance Directors' Association estimates, based on data collected by the Department of Health and Human Service.          
             NATIONAL ENERGY ASSISTANCE DIRECTORS' ASSOCIATION STATE-BY-STATE     
   LOW-INCOME HOME ENERGY ASSISTANCE PROGRAM SURVEY RESPONSES ( JUNE 11, 2001)    
       Note: The following provides a state-by-state summary of available  
   information on the status of each state's Low-Income Home Energy        
   Assistance Program (LIHEAP). As of June 11, 43 states and the District  
   of Columbia have responded to the survey. This survey will be updated as
   additional information becomes available.                               
                                KEY POINTS                               
       Of the states that have responded to date to the NEADA summer       
   survey, 19 states and the District of Columbia reported that they were  
   either out of funds or had very low balances. States reporting they were
   out of funds: District of Columbia, Iowa, Maine, Minnesota, Montana, New
   Hampshire, New Mexico, Rhode Island, and Wisconsin. States reporting    
   very low balances: Alabama, Colorado, Georgia, Illinois, Kansas,        
   Kentucky, Maryland, Massachusetts, Nebraska, New York, and Utah.        
       The remaining 24 states have at least the same amount of funds      
   available to help low-income families as they had last year at this     
   time: Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Connecticut, Delaware,     
   Florida, Hawaii, Idaho, Indiana, Michigan, New Jersey, Nevada, North    
   Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, South Carolina, South Dakota, Vermont,  
   Virginia, Washington, West Virginia and Wyoming.                        
      The NEADA survey follows two earlier surveys this year. The first    
   survey reported that the number of new families applying for program    
   assistance had increased by more than 1 million, bringing the total of  
   recipient families up to more than 5 million. The second survey,        
   reported that 4.3 million households in 19 states and the District of   
   Columbia were in arrears on their utility bills and faced possible      
   shut-off of service. Summary tables from the two surveys are included at
   the end of the narrative.                                               
      The federal Low-Income Home Energy Assistance Program (LIHEAP)       
   provides heating and cooling assistance to low-income families. During  
   the current fiscal year (October 1, 2001 to September 30, 2002) the     
   program is expected to provide assistance to at least 5.1 million       
   households, an increase of 1.1 million over last year. Due to the rapid 
   increase in demand for program services, many state program managers    
   responded by spending most, if not all, of their program funds. In      
   contrast to previous years, states retained fewer funds in order to     
   address the immediate needs of low-income applicant households.         
           Alabama                                                                 
      Alabama's LIHEAP program has about $2 3 million remaining this year, 
   which is less than last year as a result of the worst winter weather for
   many years and increases in fuel prices. All remaining funds will be    
   expended for cooling assistance. The state has always had a cooling     
   program, but there are less funds available this year. It is estimated  
   an additional $5 6 million is needed for summer cooling, especially if  
   the state experiences a severe summer.                                  
           Alaska                                                                  
      Alaska has about 9% of its funding left, which is the same as last   
   year, in spite of an unusually warm winter this year. Although there are
   no winter shut-off moratoria, the state does help with arrearage        
   payments and shut-off avoidance throughout the winter as part of the    
   regular heating assistance program. There is no summer cooling program. 
           Arizona                                                                 
      Arizona runs a year-round program for heating and cooling and the    
   supplemental contingency dollars received this fiscal year will be added
   into contracts effective July 1, 2001. These funds will be helpful in   
   providing either/or higher benefit payments and serving more households.
   Arizona is a hot weather state and summer has arrived early this year,  
   with triple digits in early May. As a result, more households are       
   expected to apply and higher benefits will be needed to offset increases
   in utility rates.                                                       
           Arkansas                                                                
      Arkansas has $1.1 million remaining as of June 1, 2001, compared to  
   $558,800 at this time last year. No cooling assistance program has been 
   planned for the summer. Unless additional funds are released, Arkansas  
   most likely will not have a summer cooling program. The state will use  
   all of the remaining funds to avoid shut-offs, for                      
   connection/reconnection fees and on arrearages, if they are creating a  
   crisis situation for the household. Approximately $1.2 million is needed
   to implement an adequate cooling program. Because of the harsh winter in
   Arkansas this year, many families are still trying to pay large         
   arrearages on both gas and electricity bills in addition to their       
   current bills.                                                          
           California                                                              
      California has about $900,000 left to provide shut-off and arrearage 
   repayment assistance. The state is also disbursing about $30 million    
   dollars from June 1 August 31st for cooling assistance and has          
   appropriated $120 million dollars to provide supplemental funding as a  
   result of higher prices due to the state's energy crisis.               
           Colorado                                                                
      Colorado's caseload increased significantly this year and there are  
   still 1,000 applications to be processed that were received before the  
   program ended on April 30th. The current $1 million balance had been    
   targeted as carryover for the start-up costs of next year's program, but
   will instead be used to fund the remaining applications (at a cost of   
   approximately $150,000) and continue the year-round furnace repair and  
   summer fan distribution programs. The summer Crisis Intervention Program
   (estimated to cost $200,000) and the summer fan distribution program    
   (estimated to cost $50,000) may be discontinued for lack of funding and 
   it appears very likely there won't be any start up money for next       
   season. By comparison, last year at this time there was $2.5 million    
   remaining after most cases had been processed.                          
           Connecticut                                                             
      Connecticut operates only a heating assistance program and           
   anticipates approximately $4 million of this year's funding will be     
   carried forward for start-up of next year's program. No cooling         
   assistance program is planned, but one will be provided if weather      
   conditions warrant it and funds are available early in the season.      
           Delaware                                                                
      Delaware will have approximately $110,000 of unrestricted funds      
   remaining at the end of June, compared to $0 last year at this time. The
   state has set aside $1.1 million for the Summer Cooling Assistance      
   Program this year, compared to $600,000 set aside last summer. Although 
   no funds were earmarked for arrearages last year, the $110,000 balance  
   this year may be utilized for that purpose. Due to a moratorium from the
   Public Service Commission that prohibited the state's largest electric  
   and gas utility from terminating a customer's utility services for about
   16 months, many households are now faced with arrearages in the         
   thousands of dollars. Specific numbers of households that may be        
   eligible are not available, but the $110,000 remaining at this time     
   would only help approximately 366 households if they each receive a     
   benefit of $300. Delaware is considering avoiding paying any arrearages 
   if not enough households can benefit from the $110,000 and using the    
   funds instead to purchase and install new furnaces under the            
   weatherization program. Or the state may provide assistance to the most 
   severe cases of arrearages and help about 110 households at $1,000 each.
   If Energy Emergency Contingency Funds are released this summer, they    
   will primarily be used to help low-income customers with arrearages who 
   are facing service terminations.                                        
           District of Columbia                                                    
      The District of Columbia operates a 12 month program but ran out of  
   funds at the end of April. There is a the District might be able to use 
   some local TANF funds to provide supplemental cooling assistance this   
   summer.                                                                 
           Florida                                                                 
      By the end of June, Florida's LIHEAP program will have expended all  
   the winter contingency funds. As a result of the increase in base       
   funding this year, there is approximately $1 million (18%) more that    
   will be available for summer cooling assistance than was expended last  
   year. Typically, the state is able to provide cooling assistance to less
   than 5% of the eligible population. With the increase in base funding   
   this year the summer cooling program will be able to assist 1 2% more of
   these eligible households. At this time, there does not appear to be a  
   problem with a backlog of arrearages.                                   
           Georgia                                                                 
      Any remaining LIHEAP funds in Georgia at the close of the regular    
   program will be used for cooling assistance. Last year a total of $5.4  
   million was expended for cooling assistance, and this year the current  
   balance available is only $2.1 million as of May 7, 2001. All of these  
   remaining funds will be used for cooling assistance. However, at a      
   maximum of $194 per household, only 10,644 households will be able to   
   receive cooling assistance. Based on last year's expenditure data, an   
   additional $1 million is needed for summer cooling. Sufficient funds are
   also not available to meet the needs for arrearage/shut-off avoidance   
   assistance. In order to provide arrearage/shut-off avoidance assistance,
   an additional $3.7 million is needed, since there are 200,000 households
   in Georgia who owe approximately $80 million in natural gas bills alone.
           Hawaii                                                                  
   Hawaii's program does not begin until June 1.                           
           Idaho                                                                   
      Idaho has a current balance of $2.9 million as compared to $1.3      
   million last year at this time. None of the remaining dollars are       
   targeted for cooling assistance or arrearage/shut-off prevention        
   programs at this time.                                                  
           Illinois                                                                
      Only $5 million remains in the Illinois LIHEAP program this year,    
   compared to $17 million last year. This $5 million balance will be used 
   for summer energy assistance (last year's effort expended $10 million). 
   The state committed $6 million this year for arrearage and shut-off     
   prevention programs (compared to $2 million last year). The Illinois    
   program estimates it needs $15 20 million for a statewide summer program
   and $10 15 million for arrearage/shut-off avoidance assistance.         
           Indiana                                                                 
      The State of Indiana has a little less than $2 million dollars       
   remaining in the Energy Assistance budget (which includes LIHEAP & oil  
   overcharge funds). These funds (about the same amount as last year) will
   all be used for summer cooling and summer fill. Funds have not been set 
   aside for arrearage assistance this year, nor have they been in the     
   past. The state is concerned about meeting the needs out of next year's 
   funding, when it is anticipated many households will be coming in with  
   high amounts in arrears.                                                
           Iowa                                                                    
      Iowa has exhausted all funds available. Approximately 79,000         
   households received a benefit that lowered their out-of-pocket expense  
   (energy burden) to 6% of total household income. There are still        
   approximately 5,000 eligible households that applied, but who, in the   
   absence of supplemental funding, will not receive any benefit. Last year
   at this time, 62,000 households had received a benefit that lowered     
   their out-of-pocket expense (energy burden) to 3.5% of total household  
   income and there was a balance of approximately $2 million unexpended   
   that was available for cooling emergencies if necessary. Ultimately,    
   those funds were used for contracting with deliverable fuel vendors,    
   locking in a lower price in August for delivery beginning in October.   
   Unfortunately, this will not be an option this year. If the remaining   
   5,000 households are to receive the average benefit that the 79,000     
   households received, an additional $2.8 million is needed. In the       
   interim between now and the receipt of any supplemental funding, those  
   5,000 households will have no alternative other than to make payment    
   arrangements that include the hoped-for LIHEAP benefit.                 
           Kansas                                                                  
      By March 12th it was determined that applications for LIHEAP benefits
   were exceeding the 18.6% increase originally anticipated for the federal
   funds available. As a result, central office instructed field staff to  
   pay only eligible households meeting the newly defined emergency        
   criteria of: (1) disconnected, (2) out of fuel, or (3) tagged for       
   disconnect (only households that were not regulated under the shut off  
   moratorium, which had been extended to April 30th). LIHEAP benefits were
   paid out at 100% of the determined benefit matrix for a portion of the  
   LIHEAP program. Since the amount of funding available was not sufficient
   to provide benefits at the 100% amount to all eligible households, the  
   remaining eligible households were paid at a prorated portion of the    
   original benefit matrix amount (47%). If the decision had not been made 
   to pay prorated benefits, approximately 7,000 eligible households would 
   not have received any type of energy assistance in a winter in which    
   fuel costs escalated and the temperatures were extremely cold. The      
   prorated benefit method was chosen in order to provide all eligible     
   households as much of a benefit as possible with the remaining federal  
   funds available. If additional funds become available the agency will   
   further supplement benefits to those households that received only a    
   prorated amount.                                                        
           Kentucky                                                                
      Kentucky only has $100,000 $150,000 of LIEHAP funding remaining.     
   Approximately $7 million is needed to operate a cooling program.        
   Already, early in the season, areas of the state have been experiencing 
   temperatures in the high 80's with high humidity. In addition, nearly   
   \3/4\ of the state has been declared to be in a severe drought.         
           Maine                                                                   
      All of Maine's LIHEAP funds have been obligated and there will not be
   any carryover over for next year. There are no funds available for      
   summer cooling or arrearage and shut off avoidance programs, which is   
   the same situation the state experienced last year.                     
           Maryland                                                                
      Maryland has less than $1 million remaining. These funds will be used
   for furnace repair and replacements. The state does not have any funds  
   available for cooling assistance.                                       
           Massachusetts                                                           
      Massachusetts will deplete all federal funds with a possibility of   
   having up to $1 million left for carryover to next fiscal year. There   
   will be no funds available for cooling assistance.                      
           Michigan                                                                
      Michigan does not expect to have any funds left at the end of the    
   program year. Of major concern is that the program will need to revert  
   to FY 2001 program limits because of reduced funding in FY 2002 (unless 
   funding is increased to include all amounts awarded as supplemental     
   appropriations in FY 2001). This means the program will not be able to  
   increase eligibility to higher levels of poverty, nor sustain CAPS      
   (rates paid for energy), despite the fact that customer expenses are    
   increasing. Additionally weatherization efforts could not continue at   
   the same level, thereby exacerbating the long-term energy consumption   
   problem.                                                                
           Minnesota                                                               
      Applications are up 34.6% over last year at this time and the benefit
   level is 34.7% larger to address higher energy costs. All funds have    
   been exhausted and new applicants are being turned away, even though the
   plan states that applications will be taken until June 1, 2001. Last    
   year there were sufficient funds to serve all who applied and an        
   additional $4 million to carryover from FY 2000 to FY 2001. Minnesota   
   has not traditionally offered cooling assistance. The FY 2001 state plan
   states that a medically necessary cooling program will be operated if   
   funds are available, but it does not appear funds will be available for 
   this purpose.                                                           
      The state's crisis program, which addresses disconnections and       
   emergency fuel deliveries, has increased this year by almost 400% over  
   the previous year. The Public Utilities Commission estimates that total 
   customer arrearages are $71 million. There are not sufficient funds to  
   address those households who are still seeking assistance because of    
   pending disconnects. Last year the program was able to assist all       
   eligible households who applied. The PUC also indicates there are a     
   minimum of 1,000 households statewide who have medical needs for cooling
   who may be income eligible for LIHEAP. An additional $300,000 would be  
   needed to provide each of these households a benefit of $300. To serve  
   all the applications currently pending would require an additional $1.9 
   million. Another $3 million in requests for crisis assistance are       
   expected by June 1.                                                     
      The Minnesota Department of Revenue mailed applications to 80,000    
   senior households early in April, and those applications are just coming
   in now. Last year a similar mailing resulted in a 12% return. If a      
   similar return is experienced this year, an additional $5.4 million will
   be needed to serve these households with the average grant of $558. In  
   previous years carryover funds were used to pre-buy propane and/or oil  
   for the next heating season. Summer purchases have greatly benefited    
   low-income households, providing them with more fuel for their money. In
   past years, the average early pre-buy program has purchased $2.3 million
   in delivered fuels. Unfortunately, there are not sufficient funds to    
   pursue this activity this year. The total amount Minnesota needs for the
   remainder of this program year is approximately $12.8 million in        
   additional funds.                                                       
           Montana                                                                 
      Montana has no remaining funds from the regular and emergency        
   appropriations this year, compared to a $400,000 balance last year. The 
   state has not been able to offer summer cooling assistance or assistance
   with arrearages.                                                        
           Nebraska                                                                
      Nebraska has approximately $670,000 that has not been designated for 
   client payments, weatherization, administration or FY 2002 carryover.   
   Approximately $1.7 million that was designated for FY 2002 carryover can
   still be used in the current year. These amounts are less than the      
   balances last year by about $1 million. Approximately $350,000 will be  
   expended in the original cooling payment and then as other households   
   qualify for cooling, the additional payments will increase. This initial
   payment is about the same as last year. During the summer months about  
   $75,000 $100,000 a week has been expended for additional cooling and    
   cooling crisis payments. Unless additional funds are received, Nebraska 
   will not be able to help with any additional heating arrearages or      
   shut-off notices. Clients are being advised to make payments over the   
   summer and heating crisis assistance will be available next winter, as  
   in the past. An additional $2 million would allow the state to avert    
   more heating shut-offs.                                                 
           Nevada                                                                  
      Although funding for Nevada's LIHEAP program increased by 15% in FY  
   2001, expenditures were up 22% compared to FY 2000, a shortfall of      
   approximately 7% for FY 2001. This summer cooling assistance will be    
   available statewide instead of only in the southern part of the state,  
   at a total expected cost of $724,711 (up from $457,284). Due to limited 
   federal funding in Nevada, the program was not designed to pay off      
   arrearages, but eligible households can avoid shut-off by paying a      
   portion of the outstanding balance. FY 2001 funding will be used to     
   start up the 2002 LIHEAP Program effective July 1, 2001, which will run 
   through May 31, 2002 (11 months). It is estimated 42% of the funding    
   used will be used to assist households, statewide, with cooling costs.  
   This is a new component. FY 2000 funding was not delineated for specific
   cooling needs. Only households in southern Nevada had their regular     
   LIHEAP benefit split between their heating provider and their cooling   
   provider. Approximately 55% of the households receiving LIHEAP benefits 
   live in the southern part of the state where temperatures are easily    
   above 100 degrees during the summer.                                    
      Approximately 146,000 households in Nevada are below 150% of the     
   poverty level. Natural gas prices have increased 68% statewide, and     
   electric costs, thus far, have climbed approximately 14%. However,      
   incremental electric increases up to 45% have been presented to the PUC 
   and are likely to be approved. Propane has increased 75%. Nevada        
   increased the benefits for clients using these three major fuel sources,
   retroactively. The average benefit will be $304 once these retroactive  
   supplemental payments are made (within the next 30 days). As such, if   
   Nevada receives the same funding in FY 2002 as was received in FY 2001, 
   the LIHEAP program will only be able to serve 7,988 households. This    
   represents only 5% of the state's low-income households at 150% of      
   poverty. Experts have presented data to the Nevada Legislature          
   projecting the average monthly summer electric bill in southern Nevada  
   will be $275 by next year. LIHEAP pays a one-time average benefit of    
   $304 per year. Low-income households, particularly those on fixed       
   incomes such as the elderly and disabled, will be unable to pay such    
   high cooling costs. As it is now, these people must make choices between
   medicine, food, or power.                                               
           New Hampshire                                                           
      New Hampshire reports that all combined emergency/regular            
   appropriations for FY 2001 have been obligated. Any remaining funds will
   be used to restore monies originally targeted for the state's           
   weatherization program. The increased demand for assistance this winter 
   season (18% increase in the number of households enrolled) caused the   
   state to suspend other fuel assistance program components including the 
   Summer Pre-buy program. At this point, sufficient funds do not exist to 
   fully restore the two programs for this program year. Last year at this 
   time approximately $409,185 had not been obligated. A cooling assistance
   program is not a regular component of New Hampshire's LIHEAP program.   
      At this point, the state is not in a position to further address the 
   need to assist with arrearage payments and shut-off avoidance. Due to   
   the demand for assistance and available LIHEAP funding, the program     
   could not be extended beyond April 30th this year. Last year, the       
   program was open for an additional month (to May 21, 2000). Although an 
   analysis has not yet been completed on the amount of funds necessary to 
   assist with arrearage/shut-off avoidance, the largest utility in the    
   state has reported that as of March 30, 2001 the amount of residential  
   accounts receivable had increased by 84% over last year (approximately  
   $2.2 million).                                                          
           New Jersey                                                              
      New Jersey has not exhausted its FY 2001 funding. Although New Jersey
   raised its income limit to 175% of the federal poverty level and        
   extended its application period, the state did not receive as many      
   applications as anticipated. Remaining funds (up to 10% of total funds) 
   will be transferred to the Weatherization Assistance Program after all  
   outstanding applications for assistance are processed.                  
           New Mexico                                                              
      New Mexico has no remaining LIHEAP funding. The program has remained 
   open with money received from the State. Even with the supplemental     
   benefits that were issued, there are daily reports of households losing 
   service or unable to purchase propane. The average benefit this year is 
   $250, whereas the average benefit in FY 2000 was $118.                  
           New York                                                                
      As of May 25th, New York estimates a LIHEAP funding balance of only  
   $23 million, which includes funds carried forward from FY 2000 to FY    
   2001. Last year at this time the balance was $35 million. No cooling    
   assistance is provided, nor does the state set aside funds for arrearage
   payments and shut-off avoidance. Crisis funds are still available to    
   avert shut-offs through the HEAP emergency component.                   
           North Dakota                                                            
      After meeting all commitments (including weatherization and other    
   services), North Dakota will have about $2.5 million remaining. There is
   no ``cooling program'' as such, but the program does purchase air       
   conditioners for people with a medical need, at a total cost of         
   approximately $200,000. Expenditures in the emergency (crisis) program  
   have been 84% higher this year than last.                               
           Ohio                                                                    
      Ohio's LIHEAP program will expend about $5 million on cooling        
   assistance this year, which is the same as last year. A supplemental    
   heating assistance benefit will be provided to everyone assisted in FY  
   2001 with the remainder of the uncommitted funds (estimated to be around
   $20 million). Because so many households had such high natural gas bills
   this winter (and 75% of the households assisted use natural gas), this  
   additional benefit will lessen the chances of these households facing a 
   shut-off during the summer. This additional benefit was not provided in 
   FY 2000. The contingency funds provided benefits to an additional 50,000
   households this year, who will have to be turned away and/or            
   benefit/eligibility levels reduced if funding in FY 2002 is not at the  
   same level as FY 2001.                                                  
           Oklahoma                                                                
      In addition to the $16.2 million Oklahoma received in LIHEAP funds   
   this year, $11.5 million was transferred into the program from TANF, and
   $4.8 million was received from the state. The estimated balance         
   remaining, after excluding the $1.5 million set aside for crisis        
   assistance and summer cooling, is only $3.7 million.                    
           Oregon                                                                  
      Oregon has expended about 80% of the total funding received. If the  
   additional contingency funds had not been allocated to the state this   
   year, the program would have been fully expended by the beginning of    
   January. The remaining funding will probably be targeted for            
   weatherization assistance and pre-purchases of oil and bulk propane.    
   Additionally, some cooling assistance may be provided in the eastern    
   part of the state or in the metro area where more households reside in  
   apartments.                                                             
           Rhode Island                                                            
      For the most part, Rhode Island's program is currently out of funds  
   that were allocated for fuel bills. Last year the program was able to   
   stay open for most of the summer to help out with shut-offs. It does not
   appear there will be funds available for cooling or summer crisis,      
   although $3 4 million is needed.                                        
           South Carolina                                                          
      South Carolina has approximately $779,308 remaining from this year's 
   combined emergency fund/regular appropriations, compared to $259,400    
   last year. An estimated $3,024,995 will be used for cooling assistance, 
   compared to $1.3 million last year. Although the maximum benefit was    
   raised from $250 to $800 this year, there are still a large number of   
   households in arrearage. The largest utility company in the state is    
   averaging 37,000 arrearages a month. Given the maximum benefit of $800, 
   an additional $1 million is needed to provide assistance to alleviate   
   these arrearages.                                                       
           South Dakota                                                            
      South Dakota has less than 10% of the funds received this year       
   remaining, which is about the same as last year. No summer cooling      
   assistance is available, and, although the state is getting reports of  
   very large arrearages, there are no funds available to help families    
   deal with their balances or prevent shut-offs.                          
           Utah                                                                    
      Utah has set aside $500,000 for cooling and crisis assistance this   
   year, compared to $650,000 last year. The state provides cooling        
   assistance only as part of the crisis program. It is anticipated the    
   need in FY 2002 will exceed that experienced this year. Funds may have  
   to be taken out of the 10% carryover set aside for next year to         
   supplement crisis/cooling assistance through the summer.                
           Vermont                                                                 
      In Vermont out of $14.5 million received in FY 2001 (block grant,    
   contingency grants, carry forward, leveraging incentive, and reallotment
   funds) only $490,000 has not been allocated (3%). Last year at this     
   time, out of $11.4 million, $685,000 had not been allocated (or 6%).    
   None of the remaining funds are targeted for cooling assistance or      
   arrearage payments and shut-off avoidance. Last year, $200,000 was      
   allocated for spring, summer, and fall emergency assistance (heat and   
   electric service disconnections--but not cooling assistance). Vermont   
   does not anticipate a similar allocation will be available this year.   
           Virginia                                                                
      Virginia has approximately $3 million remaining from its combined    
   emergency fund/regular appropriations for FY 2001, which is the same as 
   last year. Also, as last year, this entire amount will be targeted for  
   summer cooling assistance. Based on applications received last year     
   through the cooling assistance program, this amount is not sufficient to
   meet the need. Virginia would need an additional $2.1 million to serve  
   the number of applicants from last year. The state does not have a      
   program that specifically targets clients with arrearages and/or cutoffs
   because the current appropriation does not provide sufficient funds to  
   initiate a new targeted type of assistance. However, due to the         
   tremendous increases in fuel costs during the past winter many citizens 
   experienced severe hardship in making payments and are now threatened   
   with shut-off and have huge arrearages. In assessing the need for       
   additional assistance for both utilities and deliverable fuels, the     
   state estimates a need for an additional $5.6 million, based on the 1999
   00 fuel case count plus the 2000 01 crisis case count.                  
           Washington                                                              
      Washington anticipates serving 25% of the eligible households this   
   year, which leaves 75% unserved. If the federal appropriation for FY    
   2002 is only $1.4 billion, the state will only be able to serve about   
   19% of the eligible population.                                         
           West Virginia                                                           
      West Virginia estimates a current unencumbered LIHEAP balance of $2.5
   million. None of the remaining funds is earmarked for cooling or        
   arrearage/shut-off avoidance. However, a supplemental payment to LIHEAP 
   households that contain a person age 60 or older may be used for heating
   arrearages or to offset anticipated cooling costs. A minimum of $1      
   million is needed for cooling assistance.                               
      West Virginia utilizes an automated benefit issuance/eligibility     
   determination system called RAPIDS. Cost allocations for workers to     
   enter applications into the system mount up quickly, making it necessary
   to keep the LIHEAP season short. No state funds are used for LIHEAP at  
   this time. Additional funds are needed to help the state's most         
   vulnerable households.                                                  
           Wisconsin                                                               
      Wisconsin has depleted all LIHEAP funds available, in contrast to    
   last year when there was over $4 million left to use for summer fills,  
   arrearages, etc. in preparation for the next heating season. There are  
   no funds available for cooling assistance this summer, and the state    
   will only be able to operate a cooling program if supplemental funds are
   awarded for this purpose and if there is a heat emergency declared in   
   the state. Although the state intended to provide a supplemental        
   allocation to local agencies for crisis assistance, it has not been able
   to do so because of the costs for the basic heating assistance payments.
   Based on current federal funding levels (the President's budget) the    
   state will receive $31 million less for the next heating season than was
   received through regular and supplemental appropriations this year. Even
   if the level proposed by the Senate were adopted, Wisconsin would still 
   receive $11 million less that was awarded this year. Caseloads for the  
   regular heating assistance program are up over 30% in numbers of paid   
   households and up 70% in the dollar amount of heating assistance paid.  
   The amount of crisis funds available to local agencies has also been    
   increased by over 200%. For the first time the state provided $14       
   million of utility public benefits dollars, which was used primarily for
   electric benefits.                                                      
           Wyoming                                                                 
      Although Wyoming currently has a remaining LIHEAP balance of about   
   $1.2 million left, these funds will be used for additional benefits and 
   administrative costs. There is no summer cooling assistance program and 
   the crisis portion of the regular program concluded on May 15th.        
   Although sufficient funds were available for this year, the need is     
   increasing rapidly with higher fuel costs, which will result in higher  
   numbers and amounts of arrearages next year.                            
           TABLE 1: STATE LISTING OF SHUT-OFF AND ARREARAGE INFORMATION (MAY 14,  
                                      2001)                                       
      Arrearage and shut-off data is currently being collected by NEADA. As
   of May 14, 19 states and the District of Columbia reported arrearages   
   totaling almost $910 million owed by 4.3 million families. The following
   is a brief state-by-state summary of those states providing arrearage   
   and shut-off data. For further information about this survey contact:   
      California: Southern California Gas has experienced a 96% increase in
   delinquencies among its residential customers from February 2000 to     
   February 2001 increasing from 369,000 delinquent customers to 723,000   
   within that period. During the same period, arrearages for Southern     
   California Edison increased from $51 million to $100 million, while the 
   number of customers in arrearage increased from 431,182 to 567,256.     
      Connecticut: Under the state's moratorium, Connecticut Natural Gas   
   reported 12,994 families as compared to 10,378 last year; United        
   Illuminating reported 12,000 families (of which 7,000 are delinquent and
   could be terminated between April 16th and May 16th, depending on the   
   billing cycle); and Connecticut Light and Power reported 25,950         
   households. The number of delinquents may also drop as customers make   
   payments/arrangements when faced with the prospect of having their      
   service disconnected.                                                   
      District of Columbia: Washington Gas reported that 14,694 residential
   customers who were at least 60 days in arrears owed approximately $6.6  
   million. Of that total 5,229 have received shut-off notices and were    
   mailed a special letter urging immediate action to avoid shut-off.      
      Georgia: Approximately 200,000 families owe about $80 million in     
   arrearages. These families could potentially lose their gas service     
   beginning April 1st when the moratorium is lifted.                      
      Indiana: The moratorium on shut-offs will expire on April 1st.       
   Arrearages are estimated to have increased to $30.5 million from $14.4  
   million. Approximately 50,000 families could be at risk of shut-off.    
      Iowa: The state has reported there are 180,000 families with more    
   than $34.5 million in arrearages, more than double last year's amount.  
   The state PUC has extended the moratorium until May 1st.                
      Kansas: Kansas Gas Service reported that 27,000 of their customers   
   are in arrears, with average amounts that are two to three times larger 
   than normal due to the increased costs of utilities. Last week, the     
   Kansas PUC extended the moratorium on natural gas and electric service  
   disconnections through May 31st.                                        
      Kentucky: Natural gas arrearages total $30.9 million with 94,010     
   pending shutoffs.                                                       
      Louisiana: Entergy, the state's utility serving the New Orleans area,
   reported $32.9 million in arrearages, up from $14 million last year. The
   average amount in arrears this year is $400 vs. $267 last year. The     
   total number of residential families with arrearages totals about 76,000
   accounts.                                                               
      Michigan: Utilities serving 5.7 million customers reported that 1.3  
   million of its customers have generated arrearages totaling almost $98  
   million.                                                                
      Minnesota: Arrearages for electric and natural gas total             
   approximately $71.6 million. The average residential arrearage increased
   from $168 last year to $267 during the current year. As many as 100,000 
   families currently are past due on their accounts and could be          
   disconnected after April 15th and the expiration of the Cold Weather    
   Rule.                                                                   
      Mississippi: Entergy Mississippi residential arrearages are projected
   to increase by 36% from $5.6 million to $7.6 million.                   
      Missouri: The state's two largest natural gas companies have had a   
   self-imposed moratorium on shut-offs that expired March 15th. The       
   current arrearage amount is approximately $6.3 million and the estimated
   number of families to be shut-off within 30 days, if bills are not paid,
   is 13,091.                                                              
      New Jersey: Public Service Electric and Gas, the state's largest     
   utility, reported residential arrearages of $271 million, an increase of
   14% over last year. Shut-off notices have been sent to 276,715 families,
   an increase of 6% over the same period last year.                       
      Pennsylvania: Between 150,000 and 250,000 families in arrears and are
   expected to begin receiving shut-off notices.                           
      South Carolina: Arrearages have increased by 30% from last year,     
   totaling $13.5 million. Almost 37,000 families are facing shut-offs.    
      Texas: Entergy Texas has reported an increase of 41% in arrearages   
   from $7.3 million to $10.3 million.                                     
      Virginia: Columbia Gas reports a $12 million arrearage this year as  
   opposed to $2 million last year. Dominion Virginia Power, the largest   
   electricity supplier, is reporting a 33% increase in arrears over last  
   year. Approximately 20,000 customers will receive shut-off notices once 
   the voluntary moratorium is lifted.                                     
      West Virginia: American Electric Power has reported that 55,000 of   
   their 367,764 residential customers owe about $5.5 million in arrears.  
   The average arrearage is $106. Shut-off notices are currently being     
   mailed.                                                                 
      Wisconsin: Total electric and gas arrearages increased by almost 38%,
   from $71.0 million to $97.7 million. The average amount in arrears      
   increased by about 23%, from $206 to $167, while the number of          
   households in arrears increased by almost 12 percent, from 424,607      
   customers to 473,989 customers.                                         
         David Obey.                                                            
                            ADDITIONAL VIEWS OF HON. NORM DICKS                   
      Despite the best efforts of the Chairman, Ranking Member, and other  
   members of the Defense Subcommittee, the defense section of this bill is
   simply not up to the task of providing for the glaring shortfalls in    
   funding at the Department of Defense. The Committee has made several    
   appropriate adjustments to the Administration's request for funding for 
   DOD, including providing $39.9 million for repair of natural disaster   
   damages at military facilities, and adding $200 million for health care 
   at military treatment facilities. However, the Committee was hobbled by 
   an Administration request that was substantially under funded give the  
   Department's need, and a threat by the Administration to veto any bill  
   which provided for the Department's full requirements.                  
      It is my view that despite the Administration's veto threat, the     
   Committee should have increased funding for DOD by at least $3 billion  
   in emergency funding. In February, I and several other Democratic       
   members of the Appropriations, Armed Services, and other House          
   committees introduced a Defense Supplemental of $6.7 billion. That bill 
   was based on the testimony of the chiefs of each of the military        
   services, and contained $2 billion in funding for shortfalls in         
   readiness accounts not included in the Administration's request         
   transmitted to Congress. These shortfalls not addressed by the          
   Administration include $558 million for spare parts, $334.5 million in  
   pay and Basic Allowance for Housing (BAH) requirements, $254 million for
   force protection programs, $157 million for aircraft and ship depot     
   maintenance, and $150 million for recruiting and retention, among many  
   others. Although the Administration's request contained about $1 billion
   in funding for shortfall not covered in our supplemental, including many
   requests for research and development and procurement funding, the      
   Administration's request is still over $1 billion short of our bill in  
   total, and the need for funding has only increased in the time since the
   chiefs of the four military services testified before Congress in       
   January of 2001.                                                        
      The Administration has provided no credible explanation for its      
   neglect of $2 billion in shortfalls in core readiness accounts. And more
   recent information on FY01 shortfalls at DOD have convinced me that each
   of the military services will remain $1 billion short of their          
   requirements even after the bill approved by the Committee is passed    
   unless more funding can be added. It is the responsibility of Congress  
   to correct the President's defense budget and supplemental funding      
   requests when they are lacking, a responsibility which Congress has     
   kept, with bipartism support, in each of the last several fiscal years. 
   For exactly the same reasons as in those years, both the Congress and   
   the Appropriations Committee must reevaluate the level of DOD funding in
   this year's supplemental as it moves through the legislative process.   
         Norman Dicks.