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Martin State Airport, MD
Warfield ANGB

Martin State Airport, MD, is home to the 175th Wing of the Maryland Air National Guard, itself composed of the 135th Airlift Group and the 175th Fight Group.

Martin State Airport traces its history to 1929 when 1,260 acres of land located twelve miles east of Baltimore, in Middle River, MD, were purchased by Glenn L. Martin. A pioneer aviation designer and constructor, Martin bought the land for use as a manufacturing site for the company named after him, the Glenn L. Martin Aircraft Company. Among the planes built by at the site was the B-10 in 1932, which would win the company the Collier Trophy. The plant, was, for most of the 1930s, regarded as the most modern in the United States.

The facility saw additional construction from 1939 to 1941. From 1939 to 1940, the airport saw the construction of three runways, Hangars 1-2-3, as well as the Airport Administration Building, while the facility's 4-5-6 and Strawberry Point Hangars would be completed in 1940-1941. It was during that period that the site produced the China Clipper, PBM flying boats, B-26 bomber and Martin Mars aircraft.

Following the end of World War II, the company continued to produce aircraft, ranging from jet-powered aicraft to the Martini 202 and 404 commercial transports.

In September 1961, the Martin Company was consolidated with the American Marietta Corporation. The consolidation resulted in the formation of the Martin Marietta Corporation.

The 747 acres devoted to airfield use were acquired by the State of Maryland on September 20, 1975 for the purpose of retaining a General Aviation facility close to the city of Baltimore.

BRAC 2005

Secretary of Defense Recommendations: In its 2005 BRAC Recommendations, DoD recommended to deactivate the 111th Fighter Wing (Air National Guard) and relocate some of its assigned A-10 aircraft to the 175th Wing (ANG), Martin State Airport Air Guard Station, Baltimore, MD. This recommendation was part of a larger recommendation that would close NAS JRB Willow Grove, PA.

DoD also recommended to realign Martin State Airport AGS by relocating base-level TF-34 engine intermediate maintenance to Bradley ANGB, establishing - along with other TF-34 engine maintenence from Shaw Air Force Base, SC, Selfridge AGB, MI and Barnes Air Guard Station, MA - a Centralized Intermediate Repair Facility (CIRF) at Bradley for TF-34 engines.Establishing a CIRF at Bradley for TF-34 engine maintenance would compliment the realignment of the A-10 fleet. The CIRF at Bradley would consolidate TF-34 engine maintenance for ANG A-10 aircraft from Barnes, Selfridge, Martin State and active duty aircraft at Spangdahlem, Germany. Assuming no economic recovery, this recommendation could result in a maximum potential reduction of 8 jobs (4 direct jobs and 4 indirect jobs) over the 2006-2011 period in the Baltimore-Towson, MD, economic area (less than 0.1 percent).

In another Recommendation, DoD would realign Martin State Air Guard Station (AGS), MD. DoD recommended to distribute the eight C- 130J aircraft of the 175th Wing (ANG) to the 146th Airlift Wing (ANG), Channel Islands AGS, CA (four aircraft), and 143d Airlift Wing (ANG), Quonset State Airport AGS, RI (four aircraft). The Aerial Port Squadron would move to Andrews AFB, MD. Martin State (140) had a low military value ranking.

The total estimated one-time cost to the Department of Defense to implement this recommendation would be $9.4M. The net of all costs and savings to the Department during the implementation period would be a savings of $13.7M. Annual recurring savings after implementation would be $8.7M, with payback expected in one year. The net present value of the cost and savings to the Department over 20 years would be a savings of $97.1M. Assuming no economic recovery, this recommendation could result in a maximum potential reduction of 229 jobs (119 direct jobs and 110 indirect jobs) over the 2006-2011 period in the Baltimore-Towson, MD, Metropolitan Statistical economic area (less than 0.1 percent). Impacts of costs include $0.09M in costs for environmental compliance and waste management.

Realign Martin State Air Guard Station (AGS), MD. Distribute the eight C-130J aircraft of the 175th Wing (ANG) to the 146th Airlift Wing (ANG), Channel Islands AGS, CA (four aircraft), and 143d Airlift Wing (ANG), Quonset State Airport AGS, RI (four aircraft). The Aerial Port Squadron will move to Andrews Air Force Base, MD. The 143rd and 146th Airlift Wings will each retire two C-130E aircraft (total of four).

Secretary of Defense Justification: This first recommendation would enable Air Force Future Total Force transformation by consolidating the A-10 fleet at installations of higher military value. Environmentally Martin Airport Air Guard Station was in Moderate Nonattainment for Ozone (8-Hour) and an Air Conformity Determination might be required. There would also be potential impacts to wetlands.

This third recommendation would move C-130Js to Channel Islands AGS (96), and Quonset State (125), both of which ranked higher in military value and already operate the J-model C-130--avoiding conversion training costs. Additionally, this recommendation would create two right sized C-130J squadrons. The Aerial Port Squadron would be realigned to a nearby base with a robust airlift mission, retaining these skilled and highly trained ANG personnel.

Martin State (140) had a low military value ranking. This fourth recommendation moves C-130Js to Channel Islands AGS (96), and Quonset State (125), both of which rank higher in military value and already operate the J-model C-130-avoiding conversion training costs. Additionally, this recommendation creates two right-sized C-130J squadrons. The Aerial Port Squadron is realigned to a nearby base with a robust airlift mission, retaining these skilled and highly trained ANG personnel.

Community Concerns: The Maryland community opposed removing aircraft from the only fully operational C-130J organization in the Air Force. The proposed receiver sites do not have the demographics to support additional aircraft, as they are currently unable to staff their existing, smaller organizations. The 175th Airlift Wing leads the international C-130J implementation group and has developed most procedures for operating these new aircraft. Air Force analysis was based on erroneous runway length (2,000 feet short), gave no credit for landing zones although three exist within the evaluation area, and considered neither the demographic base for recruiting nor the retention effects of the realignment. The DoD proposal also failed to consider this unit's role in the National Capital Region's Continuity of Operation missions.

Commission Findings: The Commission notes the 175th Airlift Wing is the only fully operational C-130J unit in the Air Force; it plays an instrumental role in the introduction of this new aircraft, and is the leader of the international C-130J implementation group, which had developed most procedures for operating these aircraft. Further, it appears the Air Force analysis was based on erroneous runway length (2,000 feet short), gave no credit for landing zones, although three exist within the evaluation area, and considered neither the demographic base for recruiting nor the retention effects of the realignment. However, the Commission found that the factors did not rise to the level of being a substantial deviation of criteria. To support the Commission's Air National Guard and Reserve Laydown, the aircraft should be distributed from the 175th Airlift Wing.

This recommendation directing aircraft movement and personnel actions in connection with Air National Guard installations and organizations is designed to support the Future Total Force. The Commission expects that the Air Force will find new missions where needed, provide retraining opportunities, and take appropriate measures to limit possible adverse personnel impact. The Commission's intent is that the Air Force will act to assign sufficient aircrew and maintenance personnel to units gaining aircraft in accordance with current, established procedures. However, the Commission expects that all decisions with regard to manpower authorizations will be made in consultation with the governor of the state in which the affected Air National Guard unit is located. Any manpower changes must be made under existing authorities, and must be made consistent with existing limitations. Some reclassification of existing positions may be necessary, but should not be executed until the Air Force and the state have determined the future mission of the unit to preclude unnecessary personnel turbulence.

Commission Recommendations: The Commission found that the Secretary of Defense deviated substantially from final selection criterion 1 , as well as from the Force Structure Plan. Therefore, the Commission recommends the following:

Realign Martin State Air Guard Station (AGS), MD. Distribute the 8 C-130J aircraft assigned to the 175th Wing (ANG) to meet the Primary Aircraft Authorizations (PAA) requirements established by the Base Closure and Realignment recommendations of the Secretary of Defense, as amended by the Defense Base Closure and Realignment Commission.

Establish 8 Primary Aircraft Authorizations (PAA) C-130J at the 146th Airlift Wing (ANG), Channel Islands AGS, California.

Establish 8 Primary Aircraft Authorizations (PAA) C-130J at the 143d Airlift Wing (ANG), Quonset State Airport AGS, Rhode Island.

The Aerial Port Squadron located at Martin State Air Guard Station, Maryland will move to Andrews Air Force Base, Maryland.

If the State of Maryland decides to change the organization, composition and location of the 175th Wing (ANG) to integrate the unit into the Future Total Force, all other personnel allotted to the 175th Wing (ANG) will remain in place and assume a mission relevant to the security interests of the State of Maryland and consistent with the integration of the unit into the Future Total Force, including but not limited to air mobility, C4ISR, Information Operations, engineering, flight training or unmanned aerial vehicles. Where appropriate, unit personnel will be retrained in skills relevant to the emerging mission.

This recommendation does not effect a change to the authorized end-strength of the Maryland Air National Guard. The distribution of aircraft currently assigned to the 175th Wing (ANG) is based upon a resource-constrained determination by the Department of Defense that the aircraft concerned will better support national security requirements in other locations and is not conditioned upon the agreement of the state.

The Commission found that this change and the recommendation as amended are consistent with the final selection criteria and the Force Structure Plan. The full text of this and all Commission recommendations can be found in Appendix Q.



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