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Commander Sea Control Wing, Pacific [COMSEACONWINGPAC]
Commander, Task Group 12.9

Commander Sea Control Wing, Pacific, based at Naval Air Station North Island, San Diego, Calif., can search for and destroy enemy submarines and provide surveillance of surface shipping. The S-3 Viking is used primarily for enemy submarine search and prosecution missions in the vicinity of the carrier battle group. The aircraft provides an ideal balance of computer technology and anti-submarine systems which enable its crew of four to collect, process, interpret and store data. With an endurance of more than seven hours, the S-3 also provides the capability to locate and identify surface ships before they come within range of the battle group.

On April 22, 1993 onboard NAS North Island, Commander, Sea Control Wing, U.S. Pacific Fleet became the first West Coast Type Wing established, with Capt. T. Scott Douglas assuming command. This began the transition to the Type Wing organizational structure for the West Coast S-3 community.

Since the assignment of the first three pre-establishment personnel, CSCWP has overseen the completion of the transition from the S-3A to the more versatile S-3B for all Pacific Fleet squadrons; VS-21's homeport change to Atsugi, Japan, becoming the first and only forward deployed S-3B squadron; VS-41's designation as the single-site Fleet Readiness Squadron for the entire S-3 community; the increase in authorized aircraft allowance from six to eight for deployed squadrons; VQ-5's homeport change from NAS Agana, Guam to NAS North Island, and CSCWP's subsequent assumption of ISIC responsibilities; the establishment of a forward deployed VQ-5 Detachment 5 in Misawa, Japan; and the disestablishment of VS-37 in March 1995.

The wing is headquartered onboard NAS North Island with 46 military and 11 civilian members on the staff. As Commander, Task Group 12.9, CSCWP is the Operational Commander for Tactical Support Center, North Island. In total, CSCWP manages the administrative, manpower, operational and training requirements of 84 S-3B and ES-3A aircraft and over 1,800 military and civilian personnel.




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