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CG 48 Yorktown

The Yorktown (CG 48) was built from keel up to utilize every capability of the awesome Aegis Combat System and was commissioned on 4 July 1984 at Yorktown, VA. It proceeded immediately to work up for a major series of shock trials.

As of late 2001, and since commissioning, the Yorktown had completed five, highly successful Mediterranean deployments. The first, from August 1985 to April 1986, involves most notably the dramatic Achille Lauro hijacker intercept, two Black Sea excursions, and three operations off the Libyan coast.

Yorktown received the Atlantic Fleet's "Top Gun" award for outstanding Naval Gun Fire Support (NGFS) in 1987. During the second deployment from September 1987 to March 1988, Yorktown participated in numerous U.S. and NATO exercises, as well as multi- national exercises with Morocco, France, West Germany, Tunisia, and Turkey. It was on this Mediterranean deployment that Yorktown gained worldwide publicity from operations conducted in the Black Sea. While exercising the "right of innocent passage" through Soviet-claimed territorial waters, a Soviet warship intentionally collided with YORKTOWN, in what some observers have called "the last incident of the Cold War."

In 1991, Yorktown was awarded the coveted "Old Crow's" award for Electronic Warfare excellence. In 1992, Yorktown was honored with the Marjorie Sterrett Battleship Fund Award for superb, sustained combat readiness.

Yorktown served as a stabilizing force during her third and fourth Mediterranean deployments, while the world watched in wonder at the end of the Cold War and the tremendous coalition victory in DESERT STORM. During the latter of these two deployments, Yorktown participated in the first U.S. military exercises with the Romanian and Bulgarian navies, and played a key role in Operation PROVIDE COMFORT, which provided humanitarian relief and security for the Kurdish refugees in northern Iraq. In the summer of 1992, Yorktown participated in BALTOPS '92. During this cruise, Yorktown made a highly acclaimed port visit to Severmorsk, Russia, becoming the first U.S. ship to visit that port since the end of World War II.

In 1993, Yorktown was awarded the Commander, Naval Surface Forces, Atlantic Ship Safety Award for a superior safety record. Yorktown has also been awarded two Navy Unit Commendations and a Meritorious Unit Commendation, and is a four- time winner of the coveted Battle Efficiency "E."

Yorktown served as Flagship for Commander, Task Group 4.1, during Counter-Drug Operations in the Caribbean in May - July 1993. In August 1993, Yorktown participated in the joint military Exercise SOLID STANCE in the North Atlantic. YORKTOWN's operations through the end of 1993 included an October - November excursion to the Caribbean to support the United Nations embargo of Haiti. In April - May 1994, Yorktown returned to the Caribbean Sea as Force Air Warfare Commander during joint exercise AGILE PROVIDER. While in the Caribbean, Yorktown served as Flagship for Commander, Destroyer Squadron Six, coordinating a six ship, twenty-six missile exercise. In the Summer of 1994, Yorktown achieved a resounding score of 101 during Naval Gun Fire Support (NGFS) qualification.

In August of 1994, Yorktown set sail for the Adriatic Sea as Flagship for Commander, Standing Naval Forces, Atlantic in support of United Nations embargo of the former Republic of Yugoslavia. During this six month deployment, Yorktown served as the Air Warfare Commander for the Adriatic Sea, participating in a joint task force of ships from the United States and eight European nations. In May - June 1995, Yorktown proceeded south to serve as Air Warfare Commander for the Caribbean Sea in support of Counter-Drug Operations.

In December 1995 the Smart Ship Project Office was created and USS Yorktown, a Ticonderoga-class AEGIS guided missile cruiser, was chosen as the prototype Smart Ship. The "Smart Ship" Program aims at reducing manning while maintaining readiness through technological installations and philosophy changes. The core technologies installed in Yorktown are a 16 workstation fiber optic Local Area Network (LAN), Integrated Bridge System (IBS), Voyage Management System (VMS), Damage Control System(DCS), Integrated Conditioning and Assessment System (ICAS), HYDRA wireless communication system, and Standard Machinery Control System (SMCS).

In September 1996, Yorktown changed homeports from Norfolk, VA to Pascagoula, MS, after being tasked primarily with supporting operations in the Caribbean and South America.

In May 1997, Yorktown (with a reduced crew aboard) completed a five month Counter Narcotic deployment in the Caribbean followed by test operations with the USS GEORGE WASHINGTON (CVN 73) carrier battle group. During these periods Navy Manpower and Analysis Center (NAVMAC) conducted a detailed review of manpower requirements, and Operational Test and Evaluation Force (OPTEVFOR) verified the ship's ability to meet all Required Operational Capabilities in the Projected Operating Environment (ROC/POE) doctrine for Ticonderoga-class cruisers.

On September 25th, The USS Yorktown departed Pascagoula for a four month Counter Narcotics Deployment in the Caribbean. south. Before beginning patrolling efforts, Yorktown embarked staff members from COMSECONDFLT. Supported by the helicopter detachment, the Second Fleet staff surveyed and photographed another island slated as a potential replacement for training exercises if the Navy is unable to continue at Vieques Island in Puerto Rico. The ship made port calls in Jamaica; Aruba; Cartagena, Colombia; Rodman, Panama; Manta, Ecuador; and Cozumel, Mexico.

In 2000, the ship underwent a Dry Dock maintenance overhaul in Mobile, AL.

On August 17, 2004, USS Yorktown (CG 48) returned home to Naval Station Pascagoula after a successful six-month deployment with the USS Wasp (LHD 1) Expeditionary Strike Group (ESG) 2. During that deployment, Yorktown made key contributions to Operations Iraqi Freedom, Enduring Freedom, and Market Time II in support of the global war on terrorism.

The ship, with embarked Helicopter Squadron Light (HSL) 42 Det. 2 from Mayport, Fla., set sail Feb. 17 from Pascagoula, and rendezvoused with the rest of the strike group off the coast of North Carolina three days later. Other ships with the strike group included the amphibious assault ship Wasp, amphibious transport dock ship USS Shreveport (LPD 12), amphibious dock landing ship USS Whidbey Island (LSD 41), guided-missile cruiser USS Leyte Gulf (CG 55), guided-missile destroyer USS McFaul (DDG 74), and fast-attack submarine USS Connecticut (SSN 22).

Yorktown spent a short time in the Mediterranean Sea with a brief visit to Taranto, Italy. Several days later, the ship transited the Suez Canal into the Red Sea for the first time in its 20-year history, and then into the Persian Gulf.

After reporting into the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility, the crew received a distress call from the burning oil tanker, Mt. Everton, that had collided with a fishing vessel in the Arabian Sea. The Yorktown crew responded immediately, coordinated the efforts of the ships in the area providing assistance, and conducted a search and rescue operation. After the Mt. Everton's crew was rescued, Yorktown sent firefighting personnel in small boats to help extinguish the fire, and significantly contributed to the salvage of the tanker.

Yorktown then spent two months in the Persia Gulf as the on-scene commander of maritime security operations, defending U.S. and coalition warships, and protecting Iraq's Al Basra and Khawr Al Amaya oil terminals. These two Iraqi oil terminals are a vital part of Iraq's economy and accounted for more than 80 percent of the oil exported out of Iraq. To aid in their defense, U.S. Marine Corps personnel were permanently stationed on each oil terminal.

Commander, Middle East Force, Capt. Kurt Tidd and his staff embarked aboard Yorktown to command the task force. Yorktown supported the Marines by providing food and water daily, and other support services, such as showers and haircuts, to keep them combat ready. The ship and her embarked helicopter detachment continued to protect the Iraqi terminals until the end of May, successfully deterring any further attacks.

Yorktown commenced the exercise phase of her deployment in the beginning of June and participated in international exercises with the Oman, Egypt, Britain, France and Jordanian navies through mid-July. These exercises maintained strong international relationships between the United States and these countries, and improved shiphandling and warfighting skills.

Additionally, Yorktown conducted port visits to Muscat, Oman; Safaga, Egypt; and Aqaba, Jordan; in support of these exercises, hosting receptions aboard to welcome many of the influential civilian and military leaders.

After four months of high-paced fleet operations and exercises in the Middle East, Yorktown departed the 5th Fleet area of responsibility and entered the Mediterranean Sea in late July, commencing her westbound transit to Pascagoula. The ship paid port visits to Souda Bay, Greece; Valetta, Malta; and Rota, Spain; during her transit through the Mediterranean. She stopped briefly in Yorktown, Va., to offload ammunition.

USS Yorktown (CG 48) returned home to Naval Station Pascagoula 17 August 2004, after a successful six-month deployment with the USS Wasp (LHD 1) Expeditionary Strike Group (ESG) 2. Yorktown made key contributions to Operations Iraqi Freedom, Enduring Freedom, and Market Time II in support of the global war on terrorism. The crew dubbed this deployment their "Victory Lap" because it is Yorktown's last scheduled deployment before decommissioning in December 2004, and is in keeping with the ship's motto, "Victory is our Tradition."

The ship, with embarked Helicopter Squadron Light (HSL) 42 Det. 2 from Mayport, Fla., set sail Feb. 17 from Pascagoula, and rendezvoused with the rest of the strike group off the coast of North Carolina three days later. Other ships with the strike group included the amphibious assault ship Wasp, amphibious transport dock ship USS Shreveport (LPD 12), amphibious dock landing ship USS Whidbey Island (LSD 41), guided-missile cruiser USS Leyte Gulf (CG 55), guided-missile destroyer USS McFaul (DDG 74), and fast-attack submarine USS Connecticut (SSN 22).

Yorktown spent a short time in the Mediterranean Sea with a brief visit to Taranto, Italy. Several days later, the ship transited the Suez Canal into the Red Sea for the first time in its 20-year history, and then into the Persian Gulf.

After reporting into the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility, the crew demonstrated its reputation for outstanding performance with a rescue on the high seas. A distress call was received from the burning oil tanker, Mt. Everton, that had collided with a fishing vessel in the Arabian Sea. The Yorktown crew responded immediately, coordinated the efforts of the ships in the area providing assistance, and conducted a search and rescue operation. After the Mt. Everton's crew was rescued, Yorktown sent firefighting personnel in small boats to help extinguish the fire, and significantly contributed to the salvage of the tanker.

Yorktown spent two months in the Persian Gulf as the on-scene commander of maritime security operations, defending U.S. and coalition warships, and protecting Iraq's Al Basra and Khawr Al Amaya oil terminals. These two Iraqi oil terminals are a vital part of Iraq's economy and account for more than 80 percent of the oil exported out of Iraq.

Terrorists attempted an attack on these terminals with explosive-laden boats April 24. The attack on the terminals was successfully repulsed by coalition forces and Iraqi security personnel, with only minimal damage to the terminals. However, three boarding team members from USS Firebolt (PC 10) were killed in the attack.

Yorktown, who was steaming nearby, responded quickly and coordinated protection of the oil terminals with all available assets in the area. The ship's actions prevented subsequent attacks and ensured maximum protection of the vital oil platform assets. To aid in their defense, U.S. Marine Corps personnel were permanently stationed on each oil terminal.

Commander, Middle East Force, Capt. Kurt Tidd and his staff embarked aboard Yorktown to command the task force. Yorktown supported the Marines by providing food and water daily, and other support services, such as showers and haircuts, to keep them combat ready. The ship and her embarked helicopter detachment continued to protect the Iraqi terminals until the end of May, successfully deterring any further attacks.

Yorktown commenced the exercise phase of her deployment in the beginning of June and participated in international exercises with the Oman, Egypt, Britain, France and Jordanian navies through mid-July. These exercises maintained strong international relationships between the United States and these countries, and improved shiphandling and warfighting skills.

Additionally, Yorktown conducted port visits to Muscat, Oman; Safaga, Egypt; and Aqaba, Jordan; in support of these exercises, hosting receptions aboard to welcome many of the influential civilian and military leaders.

After four months of high-paced fleet operations and exercises in the Middle East, Yorktown departed the 5th Fleet area of responsibility and entered the Mediterranean Sea in late July, commencing her westbound transit to Pascagoula. The ship's hard work paid dividends with Mediterranean port visits to Souda Bay, Greece; Valetta, Malta; and Rota, Spain; during her transit through the Mediterranean.

Yorktown and her crew stopped briefly in Yorktown, Va., to offload ammunition in preparation for decommissioning in December, and embark family and friends for a 'tiger cruise,' before heading home.

USS Yorktown (CG 48), the second Ticonderoga-class guided-missile cruiser, was decommissioned Dec. 3, 2004 after more than 20 years of service, at Naval Station Pascagoula, where Yorktown had been homeported since September 1996. The ship was stricken from the active list of naval vessels, and was to be towed and transferred to the Inactive Ships Maintenance Facility in Philadelphia.

The "Fifth" Yorktown"

The USS Yorktown (CG 48), is named after the decisive battle of the American revolutionary war, and is the fifth ship to be so named.

The first YORKTOWN, a sloop-of-war commissioned in 1840, made several cruises off the coast of western Africa in support of efforts to curtail the slave trade. She sunk after hitting an uncharted reef off the Cape Verde Island in Sept 1850.

The second Yorktown was a steel hulled gunboat commissioned in 1889. She became a part of naval history in 1892 by conducting the first successful test of a telescopic gunsight, thus ushering in the age of modern naval gunnery. She was decommissioned in 1921.

The third Yorktown (CV 5) was commissioned in 1937 by her sponsor, Eleanor Roosevelt, and fought gallantly throughout the early part of the Pacific campaign during World War II. During a fierce battle, hit by three 1000lb bombs and two torpedoes, she sunk at the Battle of Midway on June 4, 1942.

The fourth Yorktown (CV 10) was commissioned in 1943 to commemorate her fallen predecessor (CV 5). She saw extensive action in the Pacific theater from 1943 to 1945, and was a stalwart of the U.S. aircraft carrier inventory for over twenty-five years. She was decommissioned in 1970 after completing several cruises in support of war fighting efforts in Vietnam, and now serves as a Navy memorial in Patriot's Point, S.C.



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