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Training Association Program

In his One Team, One Fight, One Future concept of a totally integrated AC-RC force, General Dennis J. Reimer, Chief of Staff of the Army, stated that the Army must have one clear, consistent standard. Achieving one standard requires Army readiness to be tested and validated continually. Furthermore, a thorough assessment of training and mobilization is necessary to ensure both realistically meet the needs of the Force. The AC/RC Training Association Program is designed to support the Total Force concept and the Army's increased reliance on the RC in executing the strategy.

As a departure from previous programs, unit alignment within OPLANs was not a key consideration in developing AC/RC training associations. Due to force projection priorities and requirements for some units to be aligned to two or more OPLANs, while other units are not aligned to any, specific OPLAN alignment is not particularly relevant in training associations.

Teaming is intended to replicate the cohesiveness of AC/RC relations that existed under CAPSTONE. Teaming is a pilot program for better integration, related to but distinct from the Training Association Program. The Teaming Program is designed to provide as much combat power as possible out of limited force structure. Teaming basically establishes a mutual support relationship or a follow-and-support relationship between an AC division and an ARNG division. This relationship covers the full spectrum of operations from military support to civilian authorities (MSCA) to high-intensity combat. The central idea behind teaming is that each division would take the lead in certain mission areas. If the lead division needed additional resources, it would go to the teamed division and draw from those resources. For example, if one division deployed for a major theater war, the other division could assist in deploying it. Additionally, the supporting division could provide replacement packages, as required.

Since the Gulf War, legislation and programs introduced for both the AC and RC strive to improve the mobilization, training and integration of the RC. The Army National Guard Combat Readiness Reform Act (ANGCRRA) of 1992 (Public Law 102-484, Title XI, as amended) requires that RC units considered essential for execution of the national strategy be associated with an AC unit. ANGCRRA also prescribes responsibilities for the associated unit commanders, commonly called Title XI responsibilities.

In compliance with Title XI, Forces Command (FORSCOM) Regulation 350-4 AC-RC Training Association Program (17 August 1998) establishes associations between AC units and priority RC units. In addition, it provides the training support brigades (TSB) guidance for readiness oversight responsibilities.

The AC/RC Training Association Program establishes formal linkages between select RC units and an AC modified table of organization and equipment (MTOE) unit or table of distribution and allowance (TDA) organization. This program focuses on FSP units, roundout units, units with LAD of C+30 or less, enhanced brigades, ARNG divisions, and strategic reserve brigades. This framework complements the pooling/force projection concept, provides a basis for corps and division level training and exercise participation, and facilitates implementation of ANGCRRA requirements.

Training associations are based on geographic and functional factors. The RC units selected for AC associations are linked with an AC unit within the corps or CONUSA geographic area where possible. The corps, CONUSA, Third Army, and Army Signal Command (ASC) provide oversight and manage designated AC/RC unit associations.

The Force Support Package General Officer [FSP GO] commands are associated with a corps, Third Army, or ASC. The corps, Third Army and ASC serve as senior mentor for these commands and assign comparable level elements within their organizations as peer mentor, where appropriate. The FSP units below GO command level and units with LAD of C+30 or less are associated with a training support brigade (TSB) designated by the CONUSA. The CONUSA ensure execution of AC commander's ANGCRRA requirements for these units. Select FSP units below GO command level are associated with Third Army and USACIDC.

Units designated to roundout/complete the organizational structure of AC divisions are associated with their parent division. These units (primarily attack helicopter battalions and rear area operations centers) are identified through the Army's Vertical Force Accounting System by having the same Troop Program Sequence Number as their parent division. The parent divisions serve as senior mentor for roundout units and assign comparable level divisional elements as peer mentor, where appropriate.

Enhanced brigades are associated with AC divisions or installations for senior mentorship and with AC brigades for peer mentorship. Divisions serving as senior mentor assign specific brigades within the division to serve as peer mentor for enhanced brigades. Each AC/RC brigade relation-ship is retained from year to year where possible. The ARNG divisions are associated with corps for senior mentorship and with AC divisions or installations for peer mentorship. Strategic reserve brigades are associated with AC divisions or installations for senior mentorship and with AC brigades for peer mentorship. Divisions serving as senior mentor assign specific brigades within the division as peer mentor for associated strategic reserve brigades. Units that comprise the I Corps base are associated with I Corps.

Units other than FSP units, roundout units, units with LAD of C+30 or less, enhanced brigades, ARNG divisions, and strategic reserve brigades are not assigned an AC associate under this regulation. However, AC technical training assistance for specialized RC elements and units is not prohibited when conducted under the auspices of other regulatory guidance.



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