Military


Regiment

Regiments, which are normally commanded by Colonels, control two or more battalions. Their capabilities for self-support and independent action vary considerably with the type of regiment. Maneuver brigades are the major combat units of all types of divisions. Armored cavalry regiments, which have a fixed organization, combine the efforts of their battalions and companies to fight engagements and to perform major tactical tasks in division battles. Their chief tactical responsibility is synchronizing the plans and actions of their subordinate units to accomplish a single task for the division or corps.

Aviation and armored cavalry regiments can be used to reinforce corps or divisions and can be shifted from unit to unit to tailor forces for combat. Regiments are usually employed as integral units when attached to corps or divisions.

The armored cavalry regiment [ACR] is a separate corps maneuver unit. As a corps asset, it predominantly operates for the corps commander by performing reconnaissance, security, and economy of force missions. The regiment (like the separate brigade) is considered by the corps staff as a major element of corps maneuver combat power on a par with the division. The regimental staff works closely with the corps. The staff ensures that the regiment is adequately planned for in corps operations. The regiment may also be placed under OPCON of or attached to a division. This is done for operations when command relationships better support mission accomplishment. Some missions require the regiment to reinforce a division with a squadron. A reinforced ACS is normally assigned this task. The ACS is attached or placed OPCON to the division.

The ACR operates independently over a wide area. It also operates at extended distances from other units. The ACR is a highly mobile, armored force. It is capable of fighting a fully mechanized threat in a mid-to high-intensity environment.

The ACR is normally the foundation around which the corps covering force is built. As a covering force, the regiment is expected to destroy a significant number of enemy forces in the corps security area. This requires attacking, defending, and delaying as necessary to accomplish the corps commander's intent. The ACR may also become part of the corps reserve or perform rear area operations.

The ACR is an ideal force for use in an economy of force role. This allows the corps commander to concentrate forces at the decisive point on the battlefield. If assigned a defend mission in an economy of force role, the ACR requires minimum augmentation with combat (normally infantry), CS (artillery, engineer), and CSS assets. Commitment of the ACR to this mission normally requires other corps assets to assume the corps security function.



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