Military


Division Ready Brigade (DRB)

The Army has had division ready brigades for years. Their focus is on sending an entire brigade to respond to a brigade-size situation, typically combat.

The division normally task-organizes for deployment into brigade-sized elements. A combat arms brigade of three ground maneuver battalions serves as the base for each brigade task force (TF). It is complemented with appropriate combat, CS, and CSS units (brigade slice). These brigade TFs are designated division ready brigades (DRBs), according to their stage of readiness and sequence in a deployment schedule (i.e., DRB 1, DRB 2, DRB 3).

The Armored and Mechanized Infantry Brigades are postured to deploy as part of a division alert force. This sequence is developed around the deployment of an initial ready company (IRC) in 18 hours, a division ready force (DRF) in 48 hours, and a division ready brigade (DRB) in 72 hours.

Soldiers from the 3d Infantry Division's Immediate Ready Company can deploy within 22 hours, and the brigade combat team within 72 hours.

The 82nd Airborne Division is undisputedly, the largest parachute force in the world, noted for their swiftness to literally jump into action. The Division has one battalion permanently on 18 hours standby, ready to be deployed anywhere in the world. And if necessary, the rest of the division's Ready Brigade will join them within a day. As the only air assault division in the world, the 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault) has unique intelligence needs that pose several challenges to the Intelligence battlefield functional area. Like the sister division, the 82d Airborne Division, the mission of the 101st requires that a Division Ready Brigade be "wheels up" for deployment anywhere in the world within 18 hours.

Rapid deployment is the foundation for a ready 10th Mountain Division (Light Infantry. Ninety-six hours after notification, the division is expected to deploy by air, sea and land, worldwide. In order to ensure readiness for rapid deployment, the division designates subordinate units that will deploy first. At any given time, one of the division's two infantry brigades is designated as the First Infantry Brigade to Deploy (FIBTD), with one battalion task force within the brigade designated first to deploy. The deployment readiness of the brigade centers on the philosophy that it will deploy with the personnel and equipment on-hand at the time of notification.

A Brigade becomes eligible to be a Division Ready Brigade, which normally happens when a brigade proves its fighting capabilities at the National Training Center [NTC].

Units assigned with the critical Division Ready Brigade (DRB) mission complete a thorough train-up and execute a detailed, deliberate hand-off from the unit being relieved. It is essential that key leaders in both deploying and "pusher" units complete a terrain walk of all home station deployment nodes. For both missions, an assumption brief will be given to the Division Commander at the D-120 and D-30 marks. These briefs will address training, readiness, and deployability issues. Within 30 days of assuming the mission, a Corps level Emergency Deployment Readiness Exercise will be executed to validate deployment readiness.

The division normally task-organizes for deployment (and training) into brigade-sized elements. A combat arms brigade of three ground maneuver battalions serves as the base for each brigade TF. It is complemented with appropriate combat, CS, and CSS units (brigade slice). These brigade TFs are designated division ready brigades (DRBs), according to their stage of readiness and sequence in a deployment schedule (for example, DRB1, DRB2, DRB3).

The DRB 1 is the first brigade TF to deploy. It is postured to meet the division's initial deployment timelines. Units following the DRB 1 (in the precrisis plan) are in a lesser deployment posture. This allows greater flexibility for unit training and related support activities.

The division ready brigades' ground maneuver battalions form the division ready force (DRF). These battalions also maintain various stages of readiness, depending on where they fall in the planned deployment sequence. One battalion task-organized with combat, CS, and CSS forms the DRF 1 battalion. It is the first unit in the DRB 1 to deploy. The DRF 1 designates one of its companies as the initial ready company (IRC). The IRC is the first unit to respond to division crisis requirements.

Combat, CS, and CSS elements not task-organized with a DRB or DRF are organized into separate support packages (SUPPACs) according to the division plan. These elements are also task-organized to initially provide an advance party and operational elements. The advance party prepares for the reception of follow-on forces. Initial operational elements provide the necessary support to sustain operations of the DRB 1. The advance parties also establish a support base for the arrival of the remainder of the division. This organization facilitates the division's ability to rapidly tailor and deploy SUPPACs for a separate brigade operation if the entire division does not deploy.



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