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Army Prepositioned Stock 2 (APS-2)

Army Prepositioned Stock 2 (APS-2) are the European stocks that fall under Combat Equipment Group Europe (CEGE). The authorization and equipment configuration for the pre-positioned brigade sets in Central Europe and the Netherlands is two-2x1 brigade sets (two brigades each consisting of two armor battalions and one mechanized infantry battalion). After the fall of the Berlin Wall and reduced threat from Russia, the Army began to reduce size of combat forces and supporting war reserve stocks in Europe. CEG-E became a final resting home for excess equipment. Much equipment was sent to, and returned from Desert Storm. CEG-E was also responsible for equipping the forces throughout the Balkans deployments.

With the draw down of the three brigade sets in Europe, CEG-E redistributed APS-2 Europe equipment to increase readiness of the other APS sets. From 1995 through 2003 CEG-E distributed between 250,000 and 300,000 pieces of equipment. In October 1995 Leghorn Army Depot Activity at Camp Darby in Italy became part of CEGE. The stock consists of a 2x2 brigade set, consisting of two armor battalions and two mechanized infantry battalions. Leghorn maintains accountability for materiel stored in Israel. CEGE currently has assigned about 100 military, 50 civilians, 600 local nationals, and 1,150 contract employees. Total APS-2 funding is approximately $100 million.

U.S. Kosovo Forces (KFOR) and U.S. Forces in Bosnia (SFOR) used equipment from APS-2 to support ongoing operations. Tanks, Bradley vehicles, Howitzers, and mortars are among the major combat systems provided. For SFOR, 16,683 pieces of equipment were shipped between Dec 95 and Sep 00. For KFOR, CEG-E provided 10,678 pieces of equipment between Apr 99 and May 01.

On 15 August 2001, the Army Requirements Oversight Council (AROC) approved the proposed reconfiguration and redistribution of APS-2, subject to release of the Quadrennial Defense Review. The new APS-2 configuration is specifically tailored to support EUCOM contingency requirements. It was to consist of:

  • An Immediate Ready Force of 5 M1A1s, 5 Bradley Fighting Vehicles (BFVs), 14 M113s, 20 up-armored HMMWVs, 3 HEMTTS, and 1 SEE.
  • A Battalion Task Force of 30 M1A1s, 30 BFVs and 14 M113A3s.
  • A Cavalry Troop of 10 Cavalry Fighting Vehicles.
  • A Combat Service Support package.

USAREUR adopted a new APS-2 configuration that was significantly smaller than the past configuration, with the remainder of APS-2 redistributed to other APS to increase overall readiness in APS and to other Army claimants. The reconfiguration and redistribution of APS-2 greatly reduced storage and maintenance workload at APS-2 storage sites. Site closures resulting from the APS-2 Reconfiguration involved sensitive political-military issues that required resolution between the Defense and State Departments and consultations with the host nations.

  • APS-2 - EUROPE/Central Region 1 (land): A sub-element of Army Prepositioned Stocks consisted of two Armored Battalions and one Infantry Battalion (Mech) force projection packages, stored in unit sets to reduced force deployment time. The operation was based on the concept of airlifting personnel from an Army heavy brigade and its support elements into a theater to link-up with its equipment and supplies at the Prepositioned land site.
  • APS-2 - EUROPE/Central Region 2 (land): A sub-element of Army Prepositioned Stocks consisted of two Armored Battalions and one Infantry Battalion (Mech) force projection packages, stored in unit sets to reduced force deployment time. The operation is based on the concept of airlifting personnel from an Army heavy brigade and its support elements into a theater to link-up with its equipment and supplies at the Prepositioned land site.
  • APS-2 - EUROPE/ITALY (land): A sub-element of Army Prepositioned Stocks consisted of two Armored Battalions and two Infantry Battalion (Mech) force projection packages, stored in unit sets to reduced force deployment time. The operation is based on the concept of airlifting personnel from an Army heavy brigade and its support elements into a theater to link-up with its equipment and supplies at the Prepositioned land site.
Because of the large volume of equipment stored in Europe and the corresponding needs in SWA, Europe sent the majority of its remaining stock to APS-5 in support of OEF/OIF. The surge mission was the most complex, time-sensitive, and important redistribution effort ever undertaken by the command. The sudden influx of work required the employment of 520 contractors on top of the established workforce of 1300 personnel. Much of the equipment used to support SWA was in deployable condition.

When the 173rd Brigade moved into Northern Iraq, CEG-E also issued the Immediate Reaction Force (IRF) as brigade reinforcement.23 The 173rd Brigade is a light airborne infantry brigade with no heavy weapons. USAREUR requested issue of the IRF to support the 173rd with tanks, Bradleys, and artillery. The plan worked as smoothly as exercised with all equipment issued and ready to go long before transportation was available.



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