Military


5th Battalion, 5th Air Defense Artillery Regiment
"Dragon Slayers"

The mission of the 5th Battalion, 5th Air Defense Artillery Regiment, "Dragon Slayers," is to, n order, deploy worldwide and execute air defense and aerial early warning for Army, Joint, and Coalition forces in order to enable security and freedom of action.

The 5th Battalion, 5th Air Defense Artillery Regiment was first constituted on 18 June 1861 in the Regular Army as Battery H, 5th Regiment of Artillery and was organized on 4 July 1871 at Fort Greble, Pennsylvania. During this time, the unit participated in the Civil War and earned 24 Campaign streamers in battles such as Manassas, Antietem, Fredericksburg, Gettysburg, and Chickamauga.

The unit was reorganized and redesignated on 13 February 1901 as the 54th Company, Coast Artillery, Artillery Corps. It was redesignated on 2 February 1907 as the 54th Company, Coast Artillery Corps. It was redesignated on 3 July 1916 as the 2nd Company, Fort Wadsworth and stationed in New York and was redesignated again on 31 August 1917 as the 6th Company, Coast Defenses of Southern New York. It was redesignated on 1 June 1922 as the 54th Company, Coast Artillery Corps. On 1 July 1924 as Battery E, 5th Coast Artillery and was inactivated in the Coast Defenses of Southern New York. The unit was disbanded entirely on 26 June 1944

The unit was reconstituted on 28 June 1950 in the Regular Army. It was concurrently consolidated with Battery A, 214th Antiaircraft Artillery Gun Battalion. This unit had been first constituted on 5 May 1942 in the Army of the United States as Battery A, 504th Coast Artillery and activated on 1 July 1942 at Camp Hulen, Texas. Battery A, 504th Coast Artillery was reorganized and redesignated on 20 January 1943 as Battery A, 214th Coast Artillery Battalion. Battery A, 214th Coast Artillery Battalion was redesignated on 13 November 1943 as Battery A, 214th Antiaircraft Artillery Gun Battalion. it was inactivated on 12 February 1946 at Camp Kilmer, New Jersey. The consolidated unit redesignated as Battery A, 24th Antiaircraft Artillery Gun Battalion and gained the lineage and honors from Battery A, 214th Antiaircraft Artillery Gun Battalion's World War II service, including parcipation credit for 8 campaigns: Tunisia, Sicily, Naples-Foggia, Anzio, Rome-Arno, Southern France, Rhineland, Ardennes-Alsace, and Central Europe.

The unit was redesignated on 13 March 1952 as Battery A, 24th Antiaircraft Artillery Gun Battalion and activated on 16 April 1952 in Korea. The unit was inactivated on 20 December 1954 in Korea. The unit was awarded campaign streamers for 4 campaigns during the Korean War: Second Korean Winter, Korea Summer-Fall 1952, Third Korean Winter, and Korea Summer 1953.

The unit was redesignated on 23 May 1955 as Battery A, 24th Antiaircraft Artillery Missile Battalion and activated on 1 June 1955 at Fort Banks, Massachusetts. The unit was redesignated on 1 November 1956 as Battery C, 605th Antiaircraft Artillery Missile Battalion. It was inactivated 1 September 1958 at Nahant, Massachusetts.

The unit was redesignated on 6 April 1959 as Headquarters and Headquarters Battery, 5th Rocket Howitzer Battalion, 5th Artillery. It was concurrently withdrawn from the Regular Army, allotted to the Army Reserve, and assigned to the 94th Infantry Division with its organic elements concurrently constituted. The Battalion was activated on 1 May 1959 with Headquarters at Boston, Massachusetts. Headquarters and Headquarters Battery, 5th Rocket Howitzer Battalion, 5th Artillery was consolidated on 26 August 1960 with Battery E, 5th Field Artillery (first organized in 1898), and the consolidated unit was designated as Headquarters and Headquarters Battery, 5th Rocket Howitzer Battalion, 5th Artillery.

The Battalion was reorganized and redesignated on 7 January 1963 as the 5th Howitzer Battalion, 5th Artillery, relieved from assignment to the 94th Infantry Division, and assigned to the 187th Infantry Brigade. The location of the Battalion Headquarters changed on 22 March 1963 to Roslindale, Massachusetts.

The Battalion was redesignated on 31 January 1968 as the 5th Battalion, 5th Artillery. The unit wasredesignated (less former Battery E, 5th Field Artillery) on 1 September 1971 as the 5th Battalion, 5th Air Defense Artillery. The unit was concurrently inactivated at Roslindale, Massachusetts, and relieved from assignment to the 187th Infantry Brigade. Former Battery E, 5th Field Artillery was concurrently reorganized and redesignated as the 5th Battalion, 5th Field Artillery, which thereafter had a separate lineage.

The Battalion was withdrawn on 16 November 1988 from the Army Reserve and allotted to the Regular Army. It was concurrently assigned to the 2nd Infantry Division and activated in Korea. The mission of 5th Battalion, 5th Air Defense Artillery became to protect the force and selected geopolitical assets from aerial attack, missile attack, and surveillance.

The traditional early-warning system for air defense artillery was a scout with binoculars, a grid map and a radio. Once the scout spotted the aircraft, he would attempt to identify it, and pass on its description, azimuth, and grid point to a weapon battery. That battery would validate the information and pass it down to a fire team. The fire team would then engage the aircraft when it came into view. The Forward Area Air Defense Command, Control, Communications, Computers and Intelligence System (FAAD-C4I) was intended to take the guesswork out of aircraft spotting.

The soldiers of the 5th Battalion, 5th Air Defense Artillery Regiment used JTIDS to communicate with the Air Force Airborne Warning and Control System (AWACS) aircraft flying missions out of Osan Air Force Base in South Korea. These Army FAAD units used the JTIDS radio to receive information and air tracks from sensors onboard AWACS aircraft. During an actual conflict, AWACS would transmit tracks of incoming airborne targets via JTIDS to the FAAD C2 units for engagement with ground-based air defense weapons.

In Korea, the 5th Battalion, 5th Air Defense Artillery Regiment consisted of a Headquarters and Headquarters Battery, 2 Bradley Stinger Fighting Vehicle Batteries (Battery A and B) and on Avenger Battery (Battery D). One Bradley Stinger Fighting Vehicle Battery (Battery C) was located at Fort Lewis, Washington.

B Battery was deployed at Camp Hovey, which covered nearly 4,000 acres less than a mile outside the city of Tongduchon. D Battery and the Headquarters and Headquarters Battery Battery were deployed at Camp Stanley, was located approximately 3 miles outside of the city of Uijongbu, less than 20 miles north of Seoul. It was also reported that C Battery might have been deployed at Camp Casey, located in Tongduchon approximately 40 miles North of Seoul.

The unit was redesignated on 1 October 2005 as the 5th Battalion, 5th Air Defense Artillery Regiment. With the transformation of the 2nd Infantry Division as part of the modular restructuring, beginning in 2005, and the restructuring of US Forces in Korea, the 5th Battalion, 5th Air Defense Artillery was relieved from assignment to the 2nd Infantry Division and departed Korea for Fort Lewis, Washington. The unit was assigned to the 31st Air Defense Artillery Brigade, an element of the 32nd Army Air and Missile Defense Command, headquarters at Fort Sill, Oklahoma. At Fort Lewis, however, the Battalion was under the administrative control of the 555th Engineer Brigade, I Corps.




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