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142nd Field Artillery Brigade
"Razorback Redlegs"

The unit maintains a deployment status of Force Support Package One (FSP1). This places the unit among the first to go when "the balloon goes up." They are one of six National Guard field artillery brigades to maintain this status.

The 142nd Field Artillery Brigade was originally organized between 1905-1910 in the Arkansas State Guard at Fayetteville as Company B, 2d Regiment of Infantry (The Arkansas State Guard was itself redesignated on 31 March 1907 as the Arkansas National Guard).

The unit was mustered into Federal service between 6-9 July 1917 at Fort Logan H. Roots, AR; and mustered out of Federal service on 9 March 1917 at Fort Logan H. Roots, AR. The unit was mustered into Federal service on 1 April 1917 at Camp Pike, AR, as an element of the 39th Division; it was drafted into Federal service on 5 August 1917.

The unit was consolidated on 1 November 1917 with Company M, 2d Regiment of Infantry (organized in 1897 at Harrison), converted, and redesignated as Battery B, 142d Field Artillery, an element of the 39th Division. The unit was demobilized on 26 June 1919 at Camp Pike, AR.

Former Company B, 2d Regiment of Infantry, was reorganized and Federally recognized on 4 December 1923 in the Arkansas National Guard at Fayetteville as Battery A, 206th Artillery (Coast Artillery Corps). It was redesignated on 22 April 1924 as Battery A, 206th Coast Artillery. It converted and was redesignated on 3 September 1931 as Battery A, 142d Field Artillery.

The unit was inducted into Federal service on 6 January 1941 at Fayetteville. It was reorganized and redesignated on 25 February 1943 as Battery A, 936th Field Artillery Battalion. It inactivated on 16 October 1945 in Italy.

The 142nd Field Artillery Regiment was ordered to active duty January 6, 1941, moved to Fort Sill, OK where the 3rd Battalion was disbanded. In February the Regiment moved to Camp Bowie, TX and began extensive training. On February 25, 1943 the 142nd Field Artillery Regiment was disbanded. The headquarters was redesignated the 142nd Field Artillery Group, the 1st Battalion became the 936th and the 2nd became the 937th. These were independent battalions equipped with the 155mm howitzer.

The 142nd FA Group left Camp Bowie September 25, 1943 and arrived in England on November 3, 1943. It crossed Utah Beach June 10, 1944 and participated in the European offensive with up to five battalions attached. When the war ended it was 25 miles from the Elbe River.

The 936th left Camp Bowie August 9, 1943, arrived in Algiers September 2, 1943 and landed in Naples, Italy November 11, 1943. It participated in the drive across the Rapido River, the liberation of Rome and the assault on Mount Cassino. When the war ended the 936th was across the Po River, about 45 miles from Venice. It had fired 139,364 rounds in combat and was awarded battle streamers for the following campaigns: Naples-Foggia; Rome-Arno; North Appenines and Po Valley.

The 937th left Camp Bowie on August 10, 1943, arrived in Algiers September 2, 1943 and landed in Naples, Italy November 11, 1943. It participated in the drive across the Rapido River and the liberation of Rome. It then prepared for and participated in the amphibious landings in southern France August 15, 1944. One of vessels carrying the 937th was hit by a German bomber resulting in 1 KIA, 2 MIA, 83 WIA and the loss of the fire direction equipment and one battery of howitzers. The 937th fired over 200,000 combat rounds and was awarded battle streamers for the following campaigns: Naples-Foggio; Rome-Arno; Southern France (with arrowhead); Rhineland and Central Europe.

The unit consolidated with Battery B, 936th Field Artillery Battalion, and the consolidated unit reorganized and was Federally recognized on 24 October 1946 at Fayetteville as Headquarters and Headquarters Battery, 142d Field Artillery Group. It was ordered into active Federal service 3 September 1950 at Fayetteville. (Headquarters and Headquarters Battery, 142d Field Artillery Group, was organized and Federally recognized 10 September 1952 at Fayetteville). It was released on 17 December 1954 from active Federal service and reverted to state control; Federal recognition concurrently withdrawn from Headquarters and Headquarters Battery, 142d Field Artillery Group.

The unit was again ordered into active Federal service on 24 September 1957 at Fayetteville; it was released on 23 October 1957 from active Federal service and reverted to state control.

The unit was redesignated on 1 June 1959 as Headquarters and Headquarters Battery, 142d Artillery Group, on 1 May 1972 as Headquarters and Headquarters Battery, 142d Field Artillery Group, and on 1 May 1978 as Headquarters and Headquarters Battery, 142d Field Artillery Brigade.

It was ordered into active Federal service 2 June 1980 at Fayetteville; released on 3 June 1980 from active Federal service and reverted to state control.

The 142d Field Artillery Brigade, Arkansas Army National Guard, with a battalion from Oklahoma, received the alert notification on 15 November 1990, and entered federal active duty on 21 November 1990 at Fayetteville. The 142d mobilized, trained, and was validated at Fort Sill. The 142nd deployed as a whole to support Desert Storm. It was the only National Guard field artillery unit to serve in this capacity. The Brigade deployed to Saudi Arabia on 15 January 1991, was attached to the VII Corps, supported the 1st Infantry Division during breaching operations, and supported the 1st United Kingdom Armoured Division during the ground campaign. It was released on 11 September 1991 from active Federal service and reverted to state control.

The unit was consolidated on 30 September 1996 with Headquarters Detachment, 937 Signal Battalion, and the consolidated unit was designated as Headquarters and Headquarters Battery, 142d Field Artillery Brigade.

The 142nd Field Artillery Brigade was one of six National Guard field artillery brigades brought to Germany to support the 5th Corps artillery during Exercise Urgent Victory 2000. The 142nd had 90 people distributed among the brigade tactical operations center, and the battle Simulation Center. Some of the 142nd's soldiers served as liaison officers to the 28th Infantry Division Artillery ( 28th Divarty).

The 142nd had participated in three previous Warfighter exercises and supported V Corps for two of those. The overall mission of the 142nd here at Warfighter is to provide reinforcing fire to 28th Divarty. By doctrine, two field artillery brigades reinforce each division. They are also tasked to provide counterfire; that is, fire in response to enemy fire. This was their most important mission during the exercise.

The brigade is equipped with target acquisition radar detachments that positioned as far forward on the battlefield as possible - sometimes even in front of friendly units - so that the artillery can inflict damage on the enemy before they inflict damage on V Corps. The radars scan the battlefield to locate where the enemy is shooting from. The radar picks up the location and the type of round fired. These radars are directly linked to the Initial Fire Support Automation System, (IFSAS), a computer that receives the information. IFSAS automatically assigns the mission to a battalion, based on which firing batteries are available, in range, and have the proper ammunition. The information goes into the computer system there. IFSAS system changes the tactical information to technical information automatically. It gives the azimuth, elevation and other settings for the gun.



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