Intelligence

ACCESSION NUMBER:292750
FILE ID:POL506
DATE:07/02/93
TITLE:CLINTON TO STRESS U.S.-ASIAN POLITICAL, SECURITY TIES (07/02/93)
TEXT:*93070206.POL
CLINTON TO STRESS U.S.-ASIAN POLITICAL, SECURITY TIES
(Christopher briefs on G-7, Asian trip)  (510)
By Alexander M. Sullivan
USIA White House Correspondent
Washington -- President Clinton intends to use his trip to Japan and
1outh Korea to stress the high priority he places on U.S. political and
security relationships in Asia, Secretary of State Christopher declared
July 2.
"This dynamic region provides more trade with the United States than any
other region of the world," he said, explaining the significance Clinton
attaches to the economic dimension of the relationships.
He said Clinton will deliver three "significant" speeches on his agenda for
the region, in San Francisco, July 5; in Tokyo, July 7; and in Seoul, July
10.  Each, Christopher said, "will touch different aspects of the Asian
relationship."
Additionally, the president will hold bilateral sessions in Tokyo with
Indonesian President Suharto, Japanese Prime Minister Miyazawa, and Russian
President Yeltsin.  Russia, Christopher reminded reporters, is an Asian as
well as a European power.  Clinton will meet in Seoul with South Korean
President Kim Young Sam.
According to news reports, Clinton's speech to the South Korean National
Assembly will dwell on Asian security.  The president plans to travel to
the demilitarized zone between North and South Korea to visit American
troops stationed there.  Washington is seeking to persuade North Korea to
submit to inspection of its nuclear facilities by the International Atomic
Energy Agency.
Christopher, addressing questioners at a White House briefing, declined to
set a cutoff for the U.S. talks with Pyongyang, despite Kim's expressed
fear that North Korea may be drawing them out long enough to produce
nuclear weapons.
Christopher called the initial talks in Geneva useful, noting they induced
Pyongyang to "withdraw their withdrawal" from the Nuclear Nonproliferation
Treaty.  "We don't intend to let them stall the matter," Christopher said.
"If the Geneva talks reach a stalemate, we'll recognize that.  For the time
being, the talks are useful.  We will not let them go on endlessly, I
assure you."
Christopher declined to set "a particular deadline" for reaching agreement,
although he acknowledged "achieving inspection is very important to us....I
would say discussions will continue only as long as they appear productive.
 As long as we're making progress, I think we'll continue, but not longer
than that."
Asked what Washington would do if North Korea produced nuclear weapons,
Christopher said he didn't wish to discuss intelligence reports about the
North Korean nuclear facilities but added, "the United States is watching
that closely and we will protect our vital interests."
Christopher looks to the Economic Summit for "increased cooperation and
partnership with Russia.  There should be a very strong indication of
multilateral support" for Moscow in the restructuring and privatization
programs.
He said he expects a full discussion of the situation in Bosnia but cited
the "very volatile" situation there in suggesting the G-7 leaders would not
commit to a statement, "at least until you know where matters are" next
week.
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